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  1. 2 points
    MomWithOCDSon

    Help....when to be admitted?

    Oh my, I'm so sorry! Your son's description of how he's feeling reminds me vividly of Susannah Cahalan's description of her own auto-immune illness in "Brain on Fire." She, too, experienced paranoia and some other symptoms that many traditional doctors would all too readily dismiss as solely psychiatric manifestations, dispensing with the underlying physical issues. If your son is a danger to himself or to others, you will need to get him immediate help; if that means the hospital, then it's the hospital. Unfortunately, I think it likely that you should expect to be met with some psychiatric interventions -- tranquilizers, at a minimum -- if he presents as agitated or full-on delusional at admissions. You may have reached a crossroads where the abx are insufficient for meeting his illness adequately. Can you get a PANDAS/PANS specialist on board? I know a number of families here have allowed short-term and periodic use of anti-psychotics or tranquilizers (Valium, Seroquel, etc.), just to get there kids calm enough to travel for help, and/or to give the kid and the whole family a break and some sleep. I'm not advocating that, necessarily, but you have to do what works in order to give your kid their best chance at a route which leads to the best healing. Hang in there. Hopefully, someone else will chime in with more direct experience that may resonate with your situation.
  2. 2 points
    I am checking as the mom much farther down the road to be a help, if I can. My daughter was diagnosed in November 2012. This is our five year anniversary with this disease and there is HOPE for all of your kids. This is long but please read: With one of the most profound and difficult to treat cases to ever treat - my daughter is staring community college in the spring! You name the symptom and she has exhibited it - to name a few... complex tics, anorexia, bed wetting, mutism, depression, OCD, sleep disorders, a host of psychiatric symptoms (including schizoprhenic type symptoms including violence), and catatonia. She has also had every treatment - countless antibiotics, IVIVGs, rituximab, cell cept, prophylactic antibiotix, cytoxan, tociluzimab. We lost four years of life - she lost high school, and I shut down ever yaspect of life to take care of her. It has been lonely, frustrating, difficult, depressing...and yet hopeful, strengthening, funny, and finally TRIUMPHANT. I am repositing something a wrote in 2015 to give you all some encouragement and some general advice - especially to parents of children who are most severely affected. After I wrote this my daughter's trajectory slowed, but we found tociluzumab was the treatment that finally rounded out her recovery and though she still has some memory loss and is still making her way back academically. We know that she is going to have a NORMAL LIFE. Just a year ago, I thought she would always be with us, never have a job, never have friends...and now she is learning to drive and starting college classes (with a little support from special services) in a few weeks. Now she is running, swimming, laughing, talkative, and back to her old self - volunteering at a local library and worried about her hair and makeup (you have no idea what a big deal that is). Remember that every child presents differently and the part of the autoimmune system that is affected - and therefore the treatment that works - is different for each child. That said, PM me or ask me here and I will try to start checking in now that I too have my own life back. Hang in there....it will get better... Here is the 2015 post. My daughter has one of the most severe and drug-resistant cases of what falls under the big umbrella of a strep-induced autoimmune disorder that left her with severe neurological and significant joint involvement. For those who don't remember us, my daughter was an exceptional student and athlete, and world's happiest and easy child to raise - until the bottom fell out two years ago. In a matter of a days she suddenly and frighteningly developed Sydenham's chorea, tics, mutism, mood swings, joint pain and swelling. aversions, delusions, rage and host of other heart-breaking symptoms. It has been a tremendously challenging road and so as an unwilling seasoned veteran here is the advice I am giving to anyone who thinks their child has PANDAS, PANS, LYME or any other unusual/frustrating unnamed condition. 1. Do NOT waste time. The first time you see symptoms that do not clear up permanently after a round of antibiotics, get real help. Any of the symptoms I have described indicate your child has neurological inflammation. For the majority of kids, this could mean your child has cross-reacting antibodies, that are attacking your child's healthy tissues. For many kids this could involve brain, heart or joint problems so you absolutely need to rule out any potential damage, especially heart involvement (this was the one potential result our daughter had). The longer you go, the more damage that can result and the harder it will be to treat. This means: 2. Your child has a PHYSICAL disease with psychiatric symptoms resulting from inflammation so you need the right specialists. If your child has recurrent or ongoing flares after antibiotic treatment, and you are only seeing a psychiatrist or PANDAS doctor who has not done a full spectrum of physical diagnostics (MRI, heart ultrasound, tests for Lyme, allergies, inflammatory markers, titers, etc.) then ask your pediatrician for a pediatric neurologist referral. Remember this is PHYSICAL. I can't emphasize this enough: If you can, go see a neurologist and an immunologist. 3. It's not in a name, so don't get stuck with a label. I know we all want that relief/satisfaction of saying my child has "PANDAS" or some other condition, but that can predispose physicians to start treating before a real diagnosis and plan is put forth. For example, we ran off immediately to USF for PANDAS evaluation, at which they gave us some surveys, talked to us and then tossed us some antibiotics with a diagnosis of PANDAS. Not one physical diagnostic test was done and we were foolish to go along with that. In time, they would have ramped up to IVIG, etc....but I would never have known that my daughter could have had heart damage. For those wanting a name., honestly, ( For the math-minded I think we are talking about a spectrum of autoimmune diseases that could be plotted on a coordinate plane of X and symptoms on Y, to find that our kids are scattered all over the place) I think there are as many names for these diseases as there are kids. Just call it, "Insert your child's name here" disease. I am kidding - but also not. The many presentations of these diseases explain why they sound akin to others (like Lupus) and yet different when we talk to each other here. Also, never mention diagnosis to insurance providers. Many are looking for reasons to reject claims so let your doctors and insurance companies play the coding game. 4. Take meticulous notes regarding symptoms.Take pictures and video even at bad times. Trust me, you will forget. Look for subtle things like handwriting and appetite changes, sleeping changes, expression of unusual ideas, reduced speech. When first met our neurologist, I came in not with a disease name but a table of symptoms, date of onset, severity and frequency. I wanted them to diagnose without predisposition. 5. Don't worry about the bandaids - yet. I know a lot of us sweat everything from glutens, to certain amino acids to micronutrients. Until you rule out allergies, known genetic deficiencies....don't lie awake at night and wonder whether or not you are missing some esoteric piece of the puzzle. Feed your child well, make sure they are getting plenty of vitamin D (low is usually indicative of a chronic inflammatory process), and as many nutrients as they can from real food. You are a good parent, and while the little things will help along with a healthy lifestyle, there is no magic pill. Proper diagnostics will eliminate a lot of concern about allergies and root causes so you don't waste a fortune in time and money trying this and that. We are desperate and vulnerable so read everything with a critical eye. 6. Trust your gut and assert yourself. I went to FOUR doctors and had three ER visits with my daughter, shaking my head and respectfully telling them we were moving on when they told me she was probably just depressed. WRONG. (Tangents: I think our world, present and past is full of kids who are under-diagnosed for physical problems, and there is NO difference between mental health and health. It's just health). 7. Your child is not your child. There is no way that sweet baby of yours would ever do the things he/she is doing if he/she was healthy. Easier said than done - but do not take it personally. That said, reasonable consequences apply. If your child is having severe outbursts, you have to remind yourself: THIS IS THE DISEASE. Say it like a mantra if you have to. 8. Get healthy and fit. I have had to care for my daughter for two years 24/7. Most of you will not be like that. It's going to try your body, mind and spirit. It's going to be hard so you need to be battle prepared. At times, you are going to be scared, angry, tired, frustrated and lonely so you are going to need to be at your best like no other time in your life. Get sleep and don't worry if there are fingerprints on the appliances and the car needs vacuuming. My family has learned that no matter what, I am taking an hour a day to run or surf. 9. Get brave and tough.. People closest to you are going to hurt your feelings, and give you unwanted advice. Head them off at the pass and tell them that you are on top of all the research and protocols (you need to be), that this is going to be stressful, that you are so grateful for their support, but that the things you can't have them do include _______. For me, it was advice on how to parent...like when my daughter would be defiant, or when I chose to keep her out of the public eye when her tics and chorea were severe. Doing that up front will save all of you a lot of misunderstandings down the road. The "Loving but Uninformed" in your life will give you some bizarre advice at times; take it in the spirit in which they meant it. At the same time, get soft. For me, this meant learning to accept help from other people. I have always prided myself in being able to be self-reliant, being able to do it all, but with this spectrum of disease - forget it. I have learned that letting people help is not a sign of weakness, but an acceptance of kindness that can really make a difference. The people around you who really care want to help. Let them. 10. Slow down the clock. You aren't going to get it all done. At times you are going to be late to school. Sometimes you won't get to a place at all. You might even miss a major life event like a close friend's wedding, or as it is in my case...your chid might even miss a year of school. It will work out. 11. Read it all, get informed, stay on top of it...and then walk away at times. You cannot live and breathe this everyday without becoming obsessed in an unhealthy way. My daughter loathes it that I pick up on every tic, and my husband got tired of my talking through the study results in the third standard deviation for the sample size of 12 for the methylation of a certain gene expression (whoa, sexy AND romantic) when we crawled into bed at night. (The main reason I come and go from this website .) 12. Go out at a minimum of twice a month for the evening. The only rule: Thou shall not talk about thy child or thy child's disease. Also keep something out there a month or two away to look forward to...beach, trip to parents, buying a new sofa, camping trip. Finally, don't forget the healthy siblings and your SO. As much of a nut as I am about healthy eating, sometimes a little love and acknowledgement is as easy as a box of walnut brownies that can be mixed and tossed in the oven in two minutes...with a PostIt note alongside. After two years of IVIG, Cellcept, Rixtuximab and Cytoxan, we are finally knocking down the world's most persistent immune system and our daughter is slowly getting better. Chorea is gone, tics gone, OCD gone, moods better, tremors gone, ataxia gone, mutism gone, catatonia gone, sleep patterns good, aversions gone, eating well, engaging with the family, smiling, laughing and has some quality of life. Long story short: Treat physically and if a child like ours (who is probably one of a handful of the most profound expressions ever on this disease spectrum) can get fully back on the happy and healthy track - yours will too.
  3. 2 points
    Fiddlegrl -- Welcome to the forum, though I'm sorry for all you've been through and the issues you're still fighting. I will say that I've been with this forum for many years now...first during my DS's illness and healing, and then somewhat less frequently for the last few years, checking in to follow up on old friends and any new research, and to chime in when something resonates with my experience. Pretty much ALL of the symptoms you've described, unfortunately, have been discussed here as part of the PANs/PANDAs continuum. It stinks. I don't have any practical experience with respect to Lyme and its co-infections; my DS's syndrome was clearly strep-related, though seasonal allergies exacerbated inflammation and the immune response for a number of years, once the PANDAs had kicked into high gear. Like you, though, we believe his behavioral issues were tied to atypical strep infections potentially as young as 3 years of age, though certainly by the age of 6 when he was officially given an OCD diagnosis. But he never tested positive (via swab and culture) for strep at the time, and no local doctors would give us the time of day regarding PANDAs then, either, so he went without any real treatment until he hit 12. That's when the PANDAs brought him to an absolutely non-functional state, the research coming out of NIMH, Columbia and Dr. Cunningham had progressed, and we were finally able to talk someone into an antibiotic trial. It was a long road, but the rest, as they say, is now thankfully pretty much history. As a result of our experience, though, I do think it likely that PANDAS/PANs sufferers who are at a more advanced age before receiving immune and/or anti-inflammatory therapies may have a harder road with respect to healing and "bouncing back;" not sure if that's because the brain "wiring" has matured more in the interim, or if the chronic inflammatory and auto-immune responses in the body are somehow more entrenched and therefore harder to reverse. In the end, it took my DS about 5 years in total to return to pretty much full functionality, and that was with auto-immune, therapeutic and psychiatric interventions all thrown into the mix. He continues to contend with some OCD and situational anxiety now and again, and I'm not convinced that this will ever disappear completely. But those issues remain at manageable levels (knock on wood), and he's happy and healthy and constructive and functional. Pretty much all we could ask for, after what he went through. I'm not sure how to advise you on any possible next steps, really, except to suggest that perhaps exploring some additional genetic markers and methylation issues might help you for the long term? You mentioned genetic testing for porphyria, but did you get a full work-up? A search here on the forum for "methylation" and "mutations" will lead you to multiple discussions regarding the methylation cycle and how genetic testing has helped point some families to a regimen of supplements and/or medications that proved to be more effective for them in light of various mutations and genetic predispositions. Perhaps that's worth a try? Finding a well-versed LLMD and/or integrative physician who could be your partner in working through these issues would be a bonus. Your post was very well-written, so I'm picturing an intelligent, capable and fairly "together" young woman, so I sincerely hope you're finding moments of joy and contentment in your everyday life, despite this tremendous burden. All the best to you!
  4. 1 point
    bobh

    Discipline question

    What I like about that line above, is that it emphasizes what you directly control - your own reaction to the behavior. A major problem for me was my own frustration. I could regularly see that I was not patient enough. But, if the OCD drives us nuts, it is even worse for the child, and he's just a child - without adult faculties. So intellectually, I always have to tell myself "cut him some slack, it's not really him." What I am talking about is not what behavior is allowed or not in the house, but about our reaction to them, in particular the severity of consequences for behavior that we impose. We shouldn't treat each child identically, but rather according to their needs and abilities. I don't draw a distinction between rages caused by PANS, and "behavior". It's all behavior, I didn't think that I can truly separate the two as long as PANS remains.
  5. 1 point
    Sheila

    Our Journey

    bernerchiro, this is encouraging! Thanks for the detailed report. I can imagine that a monster truck show would be very stimulating. Please do keep us posted on the nutritionist and anything else that come up.
  6. 1 point
    searching_for_help

    Hallucinations, RADON?

    When we are away from home, it never happens. I'll be calling for another radon test today. Any functional or integrative medicine doc will say YES to EMF sensitivity. If you get on Pubmed, research shows different things, but since I spend every spare minute researching health issues, the one thing I can tell you is research outcomes are determined by whoever funds the study! That being said, my son, who is probably autistic, doesn't say much, NEVER complains, we have a terrible time knowing if he is uncomfortable, etc.,... when we moved here and he would go into the room with the Comcast router/modem, he would come out and say he didn't know why, but his head hurt. I was shocked, as he NEVER mentions any ills unless I quiz the heck out of him! Our doctor is a general practitioner, but her adult kids are on the spectrum, and her son had the same issues, and he uses something to sheild it and it works for him. You might want to try mercola.com, I'm sure he has some info on dangers of wifi. Plus we already know too much cell phone use causes brain cancer, and of course no one believed that when the idea first came out... As far as avoidance, there are lots of docs posting how to avoid it. Some people put their router on a timer and shut it down for the night for a break. You should never have a tablet, phone or computer, or even your alarm clock next to your bed. Some people that get sick from it go so far as hardwiring everything, instead of wifi, like in the "good ol days"! Yes, the canary in the coal mine is definitely real. Such as our mold issue. About 25% of people have the genetics where they don't clear the mycotoxins, so you can have a room full of people, and only a few will get sick from it. Thankfully, with epigenetic studies, these people aren't labelled "hypochondriacs". Actually, I'm the the one that made the connection with our dd. She didn't know why she would get sick, but she finally realized after years of getting sick that mold was the trigger. There are many sites on how to protect yourself from EMF. Hard to know which ones are legit... you might want to try a European site, they seem to be much further ahead of us when it comes health issues.
  7. 1 point
    bobh

    New member and mystery illness

    You did mention your moldy house. You can also search here for mold and find a lot of discussion - it is a recognized environmental trigger at pandasnetwork.org, which is a rich source of info in case you are not aware of it. Do you have any option even just to try a different location for a week or two, to see if there is a difference (including when you come back)? I would tend to believe that, with a lot of patience, you could find something that would help your symptoms, possibly only somewhat like Xifaxan has, but perhaps much better. It would take work and energy that you may not have. So, lean on us here, ask questions. This forum is not as fast-paced as most facebook groups, but there is to be a wealth of experience here.
  8. 1 point
    Sheila

    will these tics ever go away?

    Hi mlee, and welcome to the forums. I'm sorry that your son has been having some tics. Seeking help from a good naturopathic doctor is a great step to take. I hope you will let us know what foods come up as problematic. That should give you some good direction. You can also ask this person for suggestions on nutrient supplements. Charting is also a terrific step, though I know it can seem overwhelming, as you say. It will get easier with time. Keep it up--but also, only take on as much as you can without stressing yourself too much. If your son has a problem with gluten-- and not everyone with tics does -- it can take some time for improvement to be seen. I would give it a couple of weeks, and even then do not expect a dramatic change immediately as it can be a gradual change, and there may be other issues going on as well. Our organization has a new book out on tracking down triggers for tics. You might find it useful. Also, I think it would encourage you, because you asked if people are able to get the tics under control, and yes, many do and some of their accounts are in this book. But it can take a comprehensive effort, not just one or two things that usually bring about all the change. Have you already had a chance to make other changes in the diet like avoiding artificial colors, flavors and preservatives in food and drink? What we have found is that a three-pronged approach can often help: 1) dietary change, 2) avoiding allergens (is your child or immediate family allergic?) and 3) avoiding toxic products typically used in the home like bleach, scented products, pesticides. In addition to the above, you want to be sure there is not an underlying infection. Please get back to us and let us know a little more and also what the naturopath suggests about the food testing. And you should definitely have hope! You have already taken some very positive steps.
  9. 1 point
    bobh

    Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy?

    Ok, here is a spreadsheet attached that includes a brief description of the tonsillectomy experience, and then a link (all but 3 to a thread here at ACN Latitudes) if you want to read more. (The hardest part of this was actually weeding out duplicate responses in different threads). tonsillectomy_results.xls
  10. 1 point
    Joyle

    Where to find Clerodendrum Inerme extract?

    Hi everyone, Yes, the plant Clerodendrum inerme does work to reduce tics and other comorbids very effectively. We have discovered it doesn't work for everyone but it has helped many. The Facebook group is called Natural Care for Tics and Tourettes. There are lengthy discussions there about this plant which we have nicknamed cleo. It can be taken as a green juice or in capsules after dehydrating and powdering the leaves or as a tincture or as a homeopathic remedy. The only restriction is you will need to source the plant and grow it in a pot or your own backyard. The safety profile of the plant is exemplary. Please also do your own research to satisfy yourselves .... there is a wealth of information about Clerodendrum inerme on the Internet. Kind regards, Joy
  11. 1 point
    We also had very severe separation anxiety as the first symptom. Then we got many others (physical as well as behavioral/psychological). During the first 2-3 months, while DS (age 10) was getting worse and worse we did 2x weekly CBT with lots of "homework" (exposures etc). It did absolutely nothing. In fact, I think the CBT had a very negative effect: permanently imprinting truly awful memories of his school in his brain (thankfully he is now back in school but there was no way he was going to go back to the school where this started; to this day, he won't set foot on that campus). I wish I had taken the energy we were putting into CBT (and then going to the psychiatrist for zoloft, also totally ineffective) and put it into medical treatment (abx, naproxen, steriods etc). Our son would never have gotten as sick as he did had we known sooner (like practically every PANDAS kid). It is very hard to know what to do, but if the antibiotics are not sufficient in bringing back your child (and unfortunately, that appears to be the case quite often) , then I would start pushing for a 5 day steriod burst. If there is a glimmer of hope with that burst, then you know it is not separation anxiety, but brain inflammation and you can pursue more medical treatment options more rapidly. As others above have said, CBT is a very useful tool. Just not for someone in a full flare of PANDAS/PANS. I think CBT can be very helpful after a child has started recovery and parents are trying to nudge them along to be able to do more and more. When we got to that stage, I had a thought along the lines of "oh, so this is what we should have been seeing with all that CBT." And unfortunately it seems CBT is a tool many parents continue to have to use when recovering from future additional flares along the way... Best of luck.
  12. 1 point
    lysia

    Do symptoms change after puberty?

    I am an adult female. I was never diagnosed with any mental illness as a child, as my parents addressed any psychological issues as solely behavioral problems to be disciplined. That being said, I suffered from very severe OCD symptoms that (I suspect) **might have been a result of PANDAS. [As this was never diagnosed nor treated, it is purely personal seculation based on the symptomology and relative timeline of exposure to streptococcus- I also share other speculations as to possible causes for the disorder, though mostly suspect the former.] I can say that for myself; the OCD began to dissipate very significantly after puberty and continued to do so over the years. I have no significant nor any life debilitating symptoms remaining of OCD whatsoever. The most debilitating and severe period of OCD that I had was between the ages of about (I think) 7-12. However, the habitual thought patterns that I had developed in my brain during that time (mind you with no counseling/medication or understanding of it as a disorder whatsoever) did take a significant amount of years to fully recover; therein many behaviors still remained. I say this because I do believe that it is highly possible that the neurophysiological OCD had in fact been mostly if not wholly eradicated during the pubescent period in which I would had been experiencing many hormonal and chemical changes in the brain possibly countering or overwhelming some others. (Again- this is much personal speculation.) Nonetheless, because OCD is what it is, I find it impossible to consider these behaviors would disappear at the same time. Gradually they did go away. I imagine then on came bigger problems of being a teenager and every little bit by bit the tics and compulsions and obsessions did dissipate. I was VERY secretive of rituals (tapping/counting/hoarding/maaany others) and did them in a way not to be seen. Because of this and that whatever my parents might had known was never pronounced to me as a "mental disorder", I credit my ignorance to having an actual illness in a way to having had allowed me to recover; as there was no stigma or added obsession (i was highly obsessed with everything) that I was handicapped with a psychological ailment. In a way, the denial around me helped. This is NOT to diminish that as a whole, however I suffered far more severely because of it. But it is worth noting i think that sometimes less attention may help with recovery. Overall of course, a child needs their mother so much, and for one with ocd- they really need their mom. I love my parents who did just as they felt best, but during that time (that to this day I remember SO well as being so truly horrifying for me), I didn't have that. I was so extremely confused, shameful, scared, and exhausted. And so incredibly isolated. I am so grateful pediatric illnessness like these are finally recognized and kids now can have amazing mothers like you who are on their side of the struggle with them rather than at the other end of it. No child should have to feel so shamed, scared, and alone. Illness, treatments, recoveries and even regressions are just as any other experiences and trials of life. They are part of each individuals journey into becoming the person they are meant to be. And children are (be them healthy/disabled/'normal'..whatever) absolutely beautiful and perfect every step of the way. This is what I wish my mother would had said to me. So i could have understood that I'm not my illness, but my strength to battle this is part of what makes me so incredible and builds my character into the fantastic person I am to become. (Of course- this and also 'lets see a psychiatrist and get treatment'), but all the same Sorry about the tangent! I came about writing this commenr ( now... memoir) in searching this subject in Google just now out of random curiosity while reflecting upon my past. When I saw your q, I felt I just had to respond with hope because my google search q was: "my pandas ocd gone after puberty". When I read this, I was so inspired by you and what you are doing for your child. Asking these questions, treating her, and being in the fight along side with her. I joined just so I could write this to you to thank you for what you are doing for her and to send the hope to u both that it absolutely goes away. I can only imagine how exhausting and challenging it could be for a parent. But can also know first hand how horrible it is to have the illness, and to go it alone as a kid is beyond awful. So that's it, really. BLESS you mom for taking care of your girl and it absolutely does get better, as I feel that indeed post pubescence changed everything. So yes- hope is there and she WILL recover. I had a fantastic time by high school being ocd free (mind you tendencies there but I feel this is a bit of personal brain wiring and takes lots of time and work . It was NOT like it was before puberty). Keep being the AMAZING kick mom you are. I'm so SO happy she has you. Just needed to respond. [[**As a side note: in respect to the other comment made by a parent in which i felt some ocd kids might be getting stigmatized by the illness and certain behaviors are being either dismissed or over addressed as psych symptoms when in fact they are either one of 2 things: an unrelated call for help or personal struggle environmentally that isn't to do with ocd, or otherwise just a very healthy response to stresses of puberty. I wanted to throw out the fact that nearly every pubescent child/young adult/teen are often incomprehensibly 'nuts by nature' too! Please consider it's a crazy time for them (thier brains, bodies, self identy, sense of life..) and the healthiest girl during puberty can be a total weirdo obsessive anxious nightmare of a kid too I wouldnt had wanted my parents to say to me it was the 'ocd' every time I acted out (either by way of empathizing/diminishing/ reprimanding or whatever) and I could be horrid at times. I fear it would had kept the obsession for me longer and I would had never believed I would be rid of it. . Maybe i would had even used it as an excuse to get away with bad behavior which would had also drawn self identity to ocd and inhibited recovery . A BIG part of breaking this very strong mental lock is to forget it whenever possible. And it is VERY hard to do, but a beautiful thing when it happens. And each instance builds into healing. Sometimes it is rare and fleeting. Sometimes it is overwhelmed by something else negative (like even some nutty teen drama being created). I would just hate a reminder if it wasn't on my brain already. So i say, if they are being teen brats and it is not 100% textbook symptomatic of OCD, then dont call them out on having a psychological illness, call them out for being brats! (Just my opinion)]]. Good luck to you and your amazing kid. You're really a hero to me. Truly. Much love.
  13. 1 point
    ALSO NEED SO. CAL DOCTOR: We are brand new to the PANS or PANDAS idea and are looking for a PANS or PANDAS dr. in So. Cal. My daughter had acute onset symptoms of anxiety, OCD and ODD (which we didn't immediately identify) two years ago at age 14. She went into screaming rages, insisted on sleeping with us in our room, didn't want to ever be alone, and had extreme behaviors incl. jumping out of a moving car. We thought it was extreme teen rebellious behavior. We started w/ CBT and In the chance that something neurological was going on, and that it was possibly food related, we instituted the Feingold diet which removes all artificial colors, artificial flavors, and artificial preservatives (primarily BHT, TBHQ, and BHA). It also decreases the amount of salicylates taken in from whole foods. We also found that she reacted strongly food high in oxalates. The CBT and dietary changes have helped esp. w/ the ODD but she's still struggling w/ focus and OCD behaviors. We really need to get to the bottom of this if possible. It's crippled her high school path completely. We're looking into Dr. K in Irvine, but I'd like to know if there are any others. PM is fine. Thank you for any suggestions.
  14. 1 point
    Hello, My son has been suffering with PANS/PANDAS since age 8. He is now 14. He was diagnosed at age 11 by a PANDAS doctor after a few years of having standard mental health treatment without success. After two years of antibiotics he received IVIG and six week post-IVIG became significantly worse. Our doctor had never seen this before. We called Dr. K. in Chicago who said my son probably still had strep in his tonsils. We were unable to get a doctor to remove his tonsils based on the PANDAS diagnosis alone. One ENT gave him clindamycin which has a history of getting into tonsils better. His PANDAS doctor then ordered the Cunninham Panel which was negative. My son did not want to participate in their study. We were left with returning to conventional neurology for the tourette symptoms and psychiatry for the OCD. A new neurologist/psychiatrist (a conventional mainstream doctor) heard our story and thought we should try the IVIG again. We did a second round and my son improved greatly then after the third round he's like his old self (as much as I can remember him after all these years.) It feels like a miracle to me. Although he's not 100% better it's remarkable enough for everyone in his life to notice. I'm not sure what helped this time. Maybe the clindamycin before the IVIG? Do not give up based on a Cunningham Panel. It is still experimental. I was crying when the doctor told me it was negative and IVIG would not work for my son. I was certain it was PANDAS. They (Cunningham) are still looking for markers and the current panel does not cover all possible markers which is why they ask families to participate in the research to find new markers. If I had turned down the offer for more IVIG based on the other doctor's recommendation from the results of the Cunningham Panel my son would not be on his way back to wholeness today. His tics are almost completely gone after years of severe tics and anxiety is very low. Almost normal. Of course after years of being in the grips of PANDAS my son has much catching up to do with peers. We still have much healing to do. I'm not sure he will ever catch up but at least now he has a chance. Good luck to everyone. Eva
  15. 1 point
    Hi, I've read several testimonies/blogs were essential oils cured PANS/PANDAS in children. Young Living Oils has the Raindrop technique with specific oils for autoimmune disorders. I reached out to PANDAS Hope for Healing twice last year and never got a response.
  16. 1 point
    Would love the same referral please for a Pans/Pandas doctor in Southern California who also is LLMD. Need a specialist in busting biofilms, Would love to find eastern or western approach at this point. Thank you!
  17. 1 point
    Did you receive a recommendation for a PANDAS doc in Orange County? I live in OC as well and have a good integrative medicine doctor that we have been using. My DS has also been diagnosed with Lyme so now I'm spreading out to an LLMD but up to now I've been happy with our integrative medicine doctor - she is very thorough and caring. Let me know if you'd like a referral and I'll private message you.
  18. 1 point
    If your child has Myamotoi Borrelia it would NOT have come up positive on standard Lyme test. It has different proteins and not testable at this time. Borrelia Spirochetes can be sexually transmitted and also passed from mother to child in-utero. We have 3 children with gestational Lyme et al PANS/PANDAS/Autism. I PM'd you a list of Dr.'s. One is located in Santa Barbara for you plus some really good Dr.'s/NP's in Bay Area. 2 of the NPs listed have children with PANS/PANDAS. Look in upper right hand corner for PM message.
  19. 1 point
    I know this is an older topic, but the easiest way to get IVIG approved is to read your policy and to go with what your policy says. PANDAS/PANS is almost always excluded. Immunodeficiency is almost always included in some way, shape or form. Whether your son meets the guidelines and what dosage he will qualify for depends on what your policy says and what your doctor orders. It may well be if he qualifies under an immunodeficiency section of the policy that your doctor can get them to approve HD IVIG on the basis that he also has an underlying autoimmune condition that would contraindicate low dose IVIG. Most IVIG policy provisions are updated yearly and there should be a date on the written IVIG coverage provisions to ensure you are dealing with the latest one.
  20. 1 point
    I'm not sure how to ask "what would be approved?", and get any info beyond what is listed in their IG clinical guideline document. That doesn't even list anti-NDMAR encephalitis -- so it's so out of date. But you're right; if it were a change in rationale, it wouldn't sound forthright. If I were to pursue the deficiency angle, I think I'd want to expand the argument and state what is the truth, i.e., that we're dealing with two problems. However ....The low dose and high dose seem to have opposite effects -- the low dose is immune-stimulatory, and the high dose immune-regulatory. So I'd be wary of making things worse by giving DS the immune-stimulatory dose. But... what if insurance were to approve say 500mg/kg IVIG product for the IgG deficiency, and my doctor prescribed 1.5 g/kg, would insurance pay for the administration and 1/3 of the Ig product, or nothing? I think I've read of someone on this site whose kid had had LD 2x, which didn't help, then the third time the MD prescribed HD and it did help a lot. So i hope the answer is the former.
  21. 1 point
    Full immune panel (IgG, IgA, etc.), ASO (strep), anti dnase B (longer-term strep titer). I think methylation issues are a VERY worthwhile trail of exploration for someone your age dealing with these issues, and it appears from your signature line that you done that. So none of the interventions you're trying for the mutations has been effective? Wombat, I don't want to discourage you from exploring every available avenue, but as the mom of a now 18-year-old who was first diagnosed with OCD at age 6, didn't get a PANDAS diagnosis until age 12, responded very well to abx (brought him back from a totally dysfunctional brink), but continues to deal with some ongoing OCD and anxiety issues (though manageable) . . . I just want to encourage you to perhaps not get hung up on the testing and interventions tied to traditional PANDAS/PANs (rapid onset, pre-pubescent expression, abx, IVIG, etc.) and perhaps lean toward more "lifestyle" type interventions that will hopefully help make life more functional, more fun, and help you push away more of the OCD that interferes with your everyday life. If you do yet have underlying infection, be it lyme or strep, etc., then abx, IVIG, etc. will likely help you to an extent. (How long were the course of abx you've tried in the past? Can you get a longer-term prescription for them and journal your behavior patterns for a period of months? We found that, after the initial "burst" of palpable benefits, abx tended to yield more subtle improvements over time . . . perhaps unnoticeable to a majority of people, but by reading back through our journaling of things our DS used to do but didn't need to do anymore, or things he'd given up to the King OCD but had begun to resume as he improved). But just from our experience, having contended with OCD for as many years as you have, I would not want to lead you to believe that abx or IVIG will be a panacea -- a cure-all. And if either of them is to be effective, IMHO, given your age and the term of your dealing with this condition, I'd wager that that you would need a longer and/or more repetitive course of these medical interventions than might be the case for a younger, more recently diagnosed case (our DS took abx for about 2 years). Additionally, I would suggest dietary, supplements, ERP/CBT and perhaps even some prescription medications to help you gain more leverage over the OCD, even if only as temporary measures. In the end, the PANDAs tests and interventions turned our DS's life around, but even so, he continues to need supports. Whether that's because he was older and the anxiety/OCD was more entrenched by the time we determined the immune condition, or if it's because it's genetically part of who he is and the PANDAS just made it worse, I can't tell you. But I've made my peace with throwing everything at this monster that's at our disposal, and that methodology, in the end, has given my DS his life back. Keep fighting, keep searching and never say never! All the best to you!
  22. 1 point
    This is a tough one. Separation anxiety/general anxiety, in our case, was the worst symptom for our daughter. I remember like it was yesterday not being able to go to the bathroom without her following. Her gran couldn't even get to take her out without mum or dad going. Luckily, it did eventually improve with 6 months of prophylaxis abx but was the last symptom to improve. Even now DD doesn't have the confidence of her peers. They are all having sleepovers etc., but DD isn't anywhere near this. Take small steps and try not to show how frustrated you are (hard as this is). It really does improve with time. You won't be at this crisis point for long. Improvement for us happened very gradually. One day at a birthday party I thought how great it was DD went off to dance on her own without holding my hand! Then she sat at the dinner table with her friends and didn't notice I wasn't stood behind her. Went to the toilet on her own without a second thought..... DD overall is 95% better since major episode 2 years ago She still takes prophylaxis for now and she will have minor relapses with viruses etc. But, despite separation anxiety being the one symptom we see decline first when she gets ill, it is nowhere near as debilitating. She just gets more nervous and on high alert for a week or two. No - she's not like her friends quite yet. But she did stay at a friend's for tea for a whole 2 hours last week without me - and didn't want to go home when I turned up to collect her! She was so proud of herself and because it went well for her (i.e. nothing 'bad' happened and mum did come back), she is now primed to do it again soon. She is actually looking forward to the next time. She will just be much older when she does all the independent things like sleepovers at friends. Word of warning though, I have been seeing a therapist to help me cope with PANDAS PTSD and I have discovered how much of an influence I can actually be on my daughter's anxiety. Without realising, I have been just as nervous as her (or worse?) at the thought of her being independent ('oh my god, she couldn't possibly do that.... worry, worry, worry.....people don't understand, that will set her right back'....etc. etc. etc.......) All those thoughts I have because I too am scarred from years of rollercoaster behaviour and trying to prevent disasters. We, as mums, have a duty to protect. This is our second nature and we do so many things we are not aware of. You are now programmed to condition the environment to your DD's needs. It doesn't matter she is getting so much better, fresh in your mind are those awful reminders of worse times. When will it happen again? Be mindful of the fact that we influence our children so much: I didn't know I was holding DD back until a stranger told me. I hope things improve for your family real soon. Hang on in there............
  23. 1 point
    A new scale for parents to rate the severity of obsessive compulsive symptoms and 11 associated neuropsychiatric symptoms (i.e., anxiety, moodiness, sleep disturbance) is in the development phase and available for use. The current scale is based on the clinical experience of doctors Susan Swedo, Miroslav Kovacevic, Beth Latimer, and James Leckman, with the help of parents Diana Pohlman, Keith Moore, and others. Instructions to complete and score the scale are included throughout the document. ACN appreciates that Dr. James Leckman, Professor of Child Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Psychology and Pediatrics at Yale, has given us permission to share the scale here. We hope it will be helpful to parents. Click here to view and print the scale.
  24. 1 point
    Our son is a couple months from 11 now. He started the famous eye blinking at 8 and did the body jerks (arms, legs and some head) a couple months later. They waxed and waned for about 4 months then stopped. He still has some facial tics, mostly some eye blinking, then nose twitching and eye brow furrowing but the jerks never came back. Even now his tics are so minor no one but me seems to notice. He goes for months with nothing, the last week he has had some eye brow furrowing, but he has been playing games on his Game Boy and this seems to be a problem. This has been a long journey for (mostly me) us. Since this started, we have now have him gluten free, clean foods, Kids Calm and Bonnies TS Control vitamins. This program seems to work and he is about %95 tic free. Even when he does get a tic, it is only one and they typically last for a week to 10 days then stop. They will start back if he has anything with wheat or food with either artificial stuff and or chocolate. I have found Natural Remedies Tic Tamer to really settle the tics down a lot when he does get them. I believe he is growing out of the tics, he seems to have the less often and less severe the his original ones. I absolutely hate these tics, and even today with his eye furrowing, made me feel very depressed and mad. I have come to realize this is my problem. He gets upset if he sees me upset about his tics, but I don't think they bother him that much. He would rather play his games and eat candy (sometimes) and knows they will give him tics. I want him to be a kid, so I don't want him to have bad memories of these precious years. I am so glad he is getting a little older so he knows what will give him tics now. A little background: No family history of tics or TS He is very bright, no other commorbid issues. Never had any vocal tics yet They bug me way more then him His tics have made me love him more then I ever thought I was capable of, and I pray that one day he is over them. Until then, I have learned to take one day at a time. I use to have those butterflies in my stomach just waiting for him to get off the school bus hoping they would be hardly noticeable. I travel a lot and still ask my wife every night "how are his tics?" Not sure why I decided to write this, just felt compelled and hoped I could offer some help. I feel like I went through the darkest days of my life since my father passed away 11 years ago and will leave you with this: He will get better and so will you. Lenny
  25. 1 point
    Hi Claire, although we did food sensitivity testing when my son was young (4yo) and again after his TS diagnosis(10yo) and also specific food elimination when we were detoxing from candida(yeast), my son does NOT have any food allergies or sensitivities, other than to artificial ingredients. He showed only a slight reactivity to peanuts, but now seems to tolerate them just fine. He does however react big time to artificial sweeteners, colors, flavors, high fructose corn syrup, preservatives and MSG and so we totally avoid these.


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