Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/21/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    I am checking as the mom much farther down the road to be a help, if I can. My daughter was diagnosed in November 2012. This is our five year anniversary with this disease and there is HOPE for all of your kids. This is long but please read: With one of the most profound and difficult to treat cases to ever treat - my daughter is staring community college in the spring! You name the symptom and she has exhibited it - to name a few... complex tics, anorexia, bed wetting, mutism, depression, OCD, sleep disorders, a host of psychiatric symptoms (including schizoprhenic type symptoms including violence), and catatonia. She has also had every treatment - countless antibiotics, IVIVGs, rituximab, cell cept, prophylactic antibiotix, cytoxan, tociluzimab. We lost four years of life - she lost high school, and I shut down ever yaspect of life to take care of her. It has been lonely, frustrating, difficult, depressing...and yet hopeful, strengthening, funny, and finally TRIUMPHANT. I am repositing something a wrote in 2015 to give you all some encouragement and some general advice - especially to parents of children who are most severely affected. After I wrote this my daughter's trajectory slowed, but we found tociluzumab was the treatment that finally rounded out her recovery and though she still has some memory loss and is still making her way back academically. We know that she is going to have a NORMAL LIFE. Just a year ago, I thought she would always be with us, never have a job, never have friends...and now she is learning to drive and starting college classes (with a little support from special services) in a few weeks. Now she is running, swimming, laughing, talkative, and back to her old self - volunteering at a local library and worried about her hair and makeup (you have no idea what a big deal that is). Remember that every child presents differently and the part of the autoimmune system that is affected - and therefore the treatment that works - is different for each child. That said, PM me or ask me here and I will try to start checking in now that I too have my own life back. Hang in there....it will get better... Here is the 2015 post. My daughter has one of the most severe and drug-resistant cases of what falls under the big umbrella of a strep-induced autoimmune disorder that left her with severe neurological and significant joint involvement. For those who don't remember us, my daughter was an exceptional student and athlete, and world's happiest and easy child to raise - until the bottom fell out two years ago. In a matter of a days she suddenly and frighteningly developed Sydenham's chorea, tics, mutism, mood swings, joint pain and swelling. aversions, delusions, rage and host of other heart-breaking symptoms. It has been a tremendously challenging road and so as an unwilling seasoned veteran here is the advice I am giving to anyone who thinks their child has PANDAS, PANS, LYME or any other unusual/frustrating unnamed condition. 1. Do NOT waste time. The first time you see symptoms that do not clear up permanently after a round of antibiotics, get real help. Any of the symptoms I have described indicate your child has neurological inflammation. For the majority of kids, this could mean your child has cross-reacting antibodies, that are attacking your child's healthy tissues. For many kids this could involve brain, heart or joint problems so you absolutely need to rule out any potential damage, especially heart involvement (this was the one potential result our daughter had). The longer you go, the more damage that can result and the harder it will be to treat. This means: 2. Your child has a PHYSICAL disease with psychiatric symptoms resulting from inflammation so you need the right specialists. If your child has recurrent or ongoing flares after antibiotic treatment, and you are only seeing a psychiatrist or PANDAS doctor who has not done a full spectrum of physical diagnostics (MRI, heart ultrasound, tests for Lyme, allergies, inflammatory markers, titers, etc.) then ask your pediatrician for a pediatric neurologist referral. Remember this is PHYSICAL. I can't emphasize this enough: If you can, go see a neurologist and an immunologist. 3. It's not in a name, so don't get stuck with a label. I know we all want that relief/satisfaction of saying my child has "PANDAS" or some other condition, but that can predispose physicians to start treating before a real diagnosis and plan is put forth. For example, we ran off immediately to USF for PANDAS evaluation, at which they gave us some surveys, talked to us and then tossed us some antibiotics with a diagnosis of PANDAS. Not one physical diagnostic test was done and we were foolish to go along with that. In time, they would have ramped up to IVIG, etc....but I would never have known that my daughter could have had heart damage. For those wanting a name., honestly, ( For the math-minded I think we are talking about a spectrum of autoimmune diseases that could be plotted on a coordinate plane of X and symptoms on Y, to find that our kids are scattered all over the place) I think there are as many names for these diseases as there are kids. Just call it, "Insert your child's name here" disease. I am kidding - but also not. The many presentations of these diseases explain why they sound akin to others (like Lupus) and yet different when we talk to each other here. Also, never mention diagnosis to insurance providers. Many are looking for reasons to reject claims so let your doctors and insurance companies play the coding game. 4. Take meticulous notes regarding symptoms.Take pictures and video even at bad times. Trust me, you will forget. Look for subtle things like handwriting and appetite changes, sleeping changes, expression of unusual ideas, reduced speech. When first met our neurologist, I came in not with a disease name but a table of symptoms, date of onset, severity and frequency. I wanted them to diagnose without predisposition. 5. Don't worry about the bandaids - yet. I know a lot of us sweat everything from glutens, to certain amino acids to micronutrients. Until you rule out allergies, known genetic deficiencies....don't lie awake at night and wonder whether or not you are missing some esoteric piece of the puzzle. Feed your child well, make sure they are getting plenty of vitamin D (low is usually indicative of a chronic inflammatory process), and as many nutrients as they can from real food. You are a good parent, and while the little things will help along with a healthy lifestyle, there is no magic pill. Proper diagnostics will eliminate a lot of concern about allergies and root causes so you don't waste a fortune in time and money trying this and that. We are desperate and vulnerable so read everything with a critical eye. 6. Trust your gut and assert yourself. I went to FOUR doctors and had three ER visits with my daughter, shaking my head and respectfully telling them we were moving on when they told me she was probably just depressed. WRONG. (Tangents: I think our world, present and past is full of kids who are under-diagnosed for physical problems, and there is NO difference between mental health and health. It's just health). 7. Your child is not your child. There is no way that sweet baby of yours would ever do the things he/she is doing if he/she was healthy. Easier said than done - but do not take it personally. That said, reasonable consequences apply. If your child is having severe outbursts, you have to remind yourself: THIS IS THE DISEASE. Say it like a mantra if you have to. 8. Get healthy and fit. I have had to care for my daughter for two years 24/7. Most of you will not be like that. It's going to try your body, mind and spirit. It's going to be hard so you need to be battle prepared. At times, you are going to be scared, angry, tired, frustrated and lonely so you are going to need to be at your best like no other time in your life. Get sleep and don't worry if there are fingerprints on the appliances and the car needs vacuuming. My family has learned that no matter what, I am taking an hour a day to run or surf. 9. Get brave and tough.. People closest to you are going to hurt your feelings, and give you unwanted advice. Head them off at the pass and tell them that you are on top of all the research and protocols (you need to be), that this is going to be stressful, that you are so grateful for their support, but that the things you can't have them do include _______. For me, it was advice on how to parent...like when my daughter would be defiant, or when I chose to keep her out of the public eye when her tics and chorea were severe. Doing that up front will save all of you a lot of misunderstandings down the road. The "Loving but Uninformed" in your life will give you some bizarre advice at times; take it in the spirit in which they meant it. At the same time, get soft. For me, this meant learning to accept help from other people. I have always prided myself in being able to be self-reliant, being able to do it all, but with this spectrum of disease - forget it. I have learned that letting people help is not a sign of weakness, but an acceptance of kindness that can really make a difference. The people around you who really care want to help. Let them. 10. Slow down the clock. You aren't going to get it all done. At times you are going to be late to school. Sometimes you won't get to a place at all. You might even miss a major life event like a close friend's wedding, or as it is in my case...your chid might even miss a year of school. It will work out. 11. Read it all, get informed, stay on top of it...and then walk away at times. You cannot live and breathe this everyday without becoming obsessed in an unhealthy way. My daughter loathes it that I pick up on every tic, and my husband got tired of my talking through the study results in the third standard deviation for the sample size of 12 for the methylation of a certain gene expression (whoa, sexy AND romantic) when we crawled into bed at night. (The main reason I come and go from this website .) 12. Go out at a minimum of twice a month for the evening. The only rule: Thou shall not talk about thy child or thy child's disease. Also keep something out there a month or two away to look forward to...beach, trip to parents, buying a new sofa, camping trip. Finally, don't forget the healthy siblings and your SO. As much of a nut as I am about healthy eating, sometimes a little love and acknowledgement is as easy as a box of walnut brownies that can be mixed and tossed in the oven in two minutes...with a PostIt note alongside. After two years of IVIG, Cellcept, Rixtuximab and Cytoxan, we are finally knocking down the world's most persistent immune system and our daughter is slowly getting better. Chorea is gone, tics gone, OCD gone, moods better, tremors gone, ataxia gone, mutism gone, catatonia gone, sleep patterns good, aversions gone, eating well, engaging with the family, smiling, laughing and has some quality of life. Long story short: Treat physically and if a child like ours (who is probably one of a handful of the most profound expressions ever on this disease spectrum) can get fully back on the happy and healthy track - yours will too.
  2. 2 points
    My DS is now 17 and applying to colleges, never thought we'd see that day. Like BOBH mentioned my DS reacted to Vit D and O3's like we had given him LSD. Super scary. But he was a paradoxical reactor as so many PANS kids are. He also was super sensi to Probiotics but I vetted the ones he took like no-tomorrow and keep copious notes on how he reacted to everything. He's the full meal deal - PANDAS Plus who never stopped flaring once he started for almost 4 years, missed almost 4 full years of any type of school he was so impacted, and was also diagnosed with Lyme and POTS. I think he was on Abx for over 4 years straight. Game changers for him were getting the Strep out (took over 6 months and a tonsillectomy) at the beginning of his illness, then 2 years later him getting Plasmapheresis (TY Dr. L), and now for the past year HBOT has been UNBELIEVABLE for Lyme symptoms, so we now have one of our own. Look into hyperbaric oxygen therapy for Lyme... My boy was almost 12 when he crashed, IVIg didn't help at all, Abx kept him from getting Strep again but didn't help him stop flaring, ibuprofen took the teeny tiniest edge off him and he took 3 caps every 4 hours for 12-18 months if not longer. PEX was huge for us, although he got worse before better, but we got the suicidal depression and schizophrenic crazy gone and our boys mind back as a result of it. He's 17 now talking about perusing an engineering degree. Dec 11th as the 6th year anniversary of his crash. It's like a bad dream we are waking up from finally, thank gosh. I sincerely hope your boy gets well soon.
  3. 2 points
    The obvious approach is to say exactly what you wrote: that you believe your son may be having neurological inflammation because of an autoimmune response based on a list of symptoms that you have documented. Then see what tests he suggests and allow him to make the diagnosis. Remember that there is an art and science to using the terminology that will ensure that your child gets the treatment needed that will also be covered by insurance. I was careful to allow each doctor to use "PANDAS" before I did. If they did not, then I didn't either. After all, a bruise is also called a contusion ;-).
  4. 2 points
    dreamingpanda

    Recovery Time

    I agree that everyone is different. So much depends on how old a person is, how severe, how long it's been untreated, and what kind of treatment they get. And sometimes, there seems to be no rhyme or reason to how fast or slow one person recovers. In my experience, I was untreated for eight years, had my first IVIG at 19, and after another IVIG and a tonsillectomy, I'd say I made a full recovery over a year later. I've since relapsed twice, but that's because I caught Lyme disease, which complicates things a great deal. From what I've observed in my own journey, it's very hard to give an accurate percentage of recovery, or to figure out when I've gotten all the way back to myself. I don't know if I've ever been 100% symptom-free since I became ill eleven years ago. I've stopped trying to assign a number to where I am in recovery, and I just gauge whether or not I'm able to live my life as I wish. Ultimately, I think that's the best a lot of us can do. For me, there's never been a day or even a month when I've suddenly realized everything was back to how it was before. It usually seems to be a painfully slow process where I shed symptoms and regain my "self" so slowly that I might not even realize it's happening. It's easy to over-analyze ever day, every tic, and every little compulsion, but the overall trajectory is what's most important. There will be ups and downs and flares for pretty much everyone, but hopefully, the underlying trend is towards the positive. At my age and given how long this went untreated, it's possible I'll always have some minor symptoms. But even if this is so, thanks to treatment, PANS hasn't stopped me from doing anything I've wanted to accomplish in my life. So hang in there! You might be in this for the long haul, and there may be a lot of ups and downs, but yes, your daughter can and will get better with the right treatment.
  5. 1 point
    puzzledguy

    New Blog!

    I've just started this blog. Feel free to follow it, and please pass it on to your adult children with PANS/PANDAS/Lyme! https://twiceapart.wordpress.com/
  6. 1 point
    MomWithOCDSon

    Antibiotics during flare question

    There are studies that speak to other properties of various antibiotics. For instance, beta-lactam antibiotics are thought to have glutamate-modulating properties, and another class (cephalasporins, maybe? my memory isn't what it used to be) are anti-inflammatory. And if your kid is taking Augmentin, for instance, that clavulanic acid component (Augmentin being amoxicillin plus clauvanate) is thought to have some neuro-protective characteristics of its own. There are multiple, older threads here about various antibiotic characteristics, and a Google search will give you some answers, too.
  7. 1 point
    sullysmom

    Pandas was on New York news!

    Here's the link.... http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/12/19/strep-throat-can-trigger-brain-disorders/
  8. 1 point
    My 10 yr old son was diagnosed with PANS by an integrative medicine doctor by the name of Mae Kinaly in Irivine, CA. We live in Manhattan Beach in LA county. She did a ton of blood work, in depth history and immediately started him on azithromycin and supplements. She is a little kooky but I feel is a very in depth doctor with my son's best interests at heart. She does offer IVIG. We also went to Dr. Miroslav Kovacevic in Chiago for a second opinion and ultimately IVIG. Hope that helps.
  9. 1 point
    For what its worth, I developed hyperaccussis--extreme sound sensitivity which responded to Aleve at prescription doses for 5-10 days or so to get it to calm down and if it starts to act up again, I go back on the aleve (naproxen sodium).
  10. 1 point
    bobh

    This is what I struggle with....

    Unfortunately, there is no clear definitive biomarker for PANDAS, so blood results are just a guideline. Our son was also always a bit more anxious that our other kids, but we got a PANS diagnosis primarily because of an extreme ramp up of OCD symptoms after some (unknown) flu-like sickness when he was 9. He actually had a bout of severe OCD at 6, that mostly went away months later. We wish we had been tuned into PANDAS/PANS back then (because if caught early, it should be better), but we didn't learn until he was 9. So, you are in better shape than we are. If unsure, Dr. T. might weigh the risk of giving him longer-than-normal trial of abx vs. having PANDAS untreated. Catching this early is a good thing. Having gone through all that we have, I would be more anxious about untreated PANDAS than about wasting the time and money you have spent on a possible dead end.
  11. 1 point
    gladiator16

    Does this look like a tic?

    I think it looks like a tic . My son has that sort of movement sometimes . Ive counted 10 different movements that my boy does all of which are slightly different . I hope I'm wrong xxx
  12. 1 point
    Hello, My son has been suffering with PANS/PANDAS since age 8. He is now 14. He was diagnosed at age 11 by a PANDAS doctor after a few years of having standard mental health treatment without success. After two years of antibiotics he received IVIG and six week post-IVIG became significantly worse. Our doctor had never seen this before. We called Dr. K. in Chicago who said my son probably still had strep in his tonsils. We were unable to get a doctor to remove his tonsils based on the PANDAS diagnosis alone. One ENT gave him clindamycin which has a history of getting into tonsils better. His PANDAS doctor then ordered the Cunninham Panel which was negative. My son did not want to participate in their study. We were left with returning to conventional neurology for the tourette symptoms and psychiatry for the OCD. A new neurologist/psychiatrist (a conventional mainstream doctor) heard our story and thought we should try the IVIG again. We did a second round and my son improved greatly then after the third round he's like his old self (as much as I can remember him after all these years.) It feels like a miracle to me. Although he's not 100% better it's remarkable enough for everyone in his life to notice. I'm not sure what helped this time. Maybe the clindamycin before the IVIG? Do not give up based on a Cunningham Panel. It is still experimental. I was crying when the doctor told me it was negative and IVIG would not work for my son. I was certain it was PANDAS. They (Cunningham) are still looking for markers and the current panel does not cover all possible markers which is why they ask families to participate in the research to find new markers. If I had turned down the offer for more IVIG based on the other doctor's recommendation from the results of the Cunningham Panel my son would not be on his way back to wholeness today. His tics are almost completely gone after years of severe tics and anxiety is very low. Almost normal. Of course after years of being in the grips of PANDAS my son has much catching up to do with peers. We still have much healing to do. I'm not sure he will ever catch up but at least now he has a chance. Good luck to everyone. Eva
  13. 1 point
    Hi, I've read several testimonies/blogs were essential oils cured PANS/PANDAS in children. Young Living Oils has the Raindrop technique with specific oils for autoimmune disorders. I reached out to PANDAS Hope for Healing twice last year and never got a response.
  14. 1 point
    lnn

    homeschooling/schoolwork and pandas

    Welcome to the forum and "welcome" to Pandas/Pans. I've unfortunately been at this for many years, first with my now recovered son and now with my daughter. I home schooled my daughter last year because her health was too precarious. Because it was only for one year and we always had the intention of returning to public school when she was able (for social reasons), our approach was probably different from yours. But I'll share what worked in case it helps. I think the biggest thing that was helpful was mindset. Like your daughter, mine went from being very capable to being very handicapped in what she could handle in terms of workload and abilities. There's a medical reason for this - inflammation in the brain creates what's called a cytokine storm. There are many inflammatory cytokines that become elevated, but one - CaM Kinase II - is essential for learning and memory - from Wikipedia: Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II or CaMKII) is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase that is regulated by the Ca2+ /calmodulin complex. CaMKII is involved in many signaling cascades and is thought to be an important mediator of learning and memory.[1] Misregulation of CaMKII is linked to Alzheimer’s disease, Angelman syndrome, and heart arrhythmia.[6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ca2%2B/calmodulin-dependent_protein_kinase_II We had bad days and worse days. Some days, she was able to learn in a fairly typical manner and other days, it was like teaching someone who had suffered a brain injury like a stroke or car accident. So the most important thing I did each day was to feel out where she was at, what she was capable of that day (and I also had to realize that every day might put us at a different starting place, and sometimes she'd have different capabilities throughout the day). Re-setting my expectations on the fly was essential. Otherwise, I'd expect too much, she'd stress over disappointing me and over her own sense of loss. Much like working with someone who's in rehab for a stroke - how frustrating it is to not be able to do things you've easily done for your whole life. So forget about what she used to be able to do. Forget about what her brother can do. These are, for now, false points of reference. Start each lesson by assessing where she is at that moment and work with that. Do not show your frustration or expect more than she can give. That just blames her for something that's not in her control. You wouldn't do that to someone in rehab. You can push the way a cheerleader might - "hey, do you think you can do one more problem? No? Ok, take a break, you did a good job." But don't push with the thought that you can somehow push her back into being her old self (spoken from experience). My daughter (12) reads at a 12th grade level. But there were many times she couldn't focus on the words on the page. But she could listen. So I'd read her social studies book to her while she doodled (drawing helped her stay focused, ironically, because it's something that relaxes her and it distracted her from her anxiety). Then she'd answer questions about what I'd just read to her. Sometimes she could write the answers herself, sometimes I could see from her horrible handwriting that I'd have to scribe what she verbally told me. We just had to be flexible. We did a lot of verbal discussions. We broke lessons up into very small chunks - sometimes as little as 5 minutes. Then we'd re-group 15 minutes later, or an hour later, or a day later. I had to let go of my scheduling, my goals, and just listen to her body and support her. The old her was temporarily gone. I had to teach the person who showed up that day and just help that person do her best for that day. Not easy for a Type A mom. But it's what she needed. She is back in school this year, on a modified school day, with many absences (but for social reasons, she is adamant about being back in public). We often find ourselves having to do do school work at home to make up for missed days, and our approach is to do things in very small chunks. When she's feeling well, she takes pride in doing things independently. When she's in a bad place, I sit with her and coach her every step of the way. It's very much a teaching-as-if-you're-a-rehab-therapist approach. The amazing thing is that once the body heals, the old child comes back. You don't need to worry about her getting lazy or developing bad habits. No one wants to get back to her old self more than she does. When she heals, she will return to the independent, curious child she's been.
  15. 1 point
    Did you receive a recommendation for a PANDAS doc in Orange County? I live in OC as well and have a good integrative medicine doctor that we have been using. My DS has also been diagnosed with Lyme so now I'm spreading out to an LLMD but up to now I've been happy with our integrative medicine doctor - she is very thorough and caring. Let me know if you'd like a referral and I'll private message you.
  16. 1 point
    Your child's Periodic Fever Syndrome as a toddler has me concerned there are other potential infections involved. Many of us found that although strep was an obvious trigger there were other underlying infections or viruses. Borrelia Miyamotoi is the more predominate TBI (tick born infection) in CA and is not testable via any standard Lyme test. Borrelia Miyamoti is also known to cause relapsing fevers. Here is a little blurb and you can google Borrelia Migamotoi Relapsing Fever for more references. Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever Borrelia group spirochete that is transmitted by the same hard-bodied (ixodid) tick species that transmit the agents of Lyme disease. Tick Study in CA: http://www.bayarealyme.org/about-lyme/what-causes-lyme-disease/borrelia-miyamotoi/ http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/miyamotoi.html I would highly recommend seeing an LLMD (Lyme Literate Dr.) that understands PANS/PANDAS to investigate further for your son. We have wonderful LLMDs in Northern CA that are very well versed in PANS and/or PANDAS if you are willing to travel. Please PM via the forum for referrals. Does your child have a known tick bite at any point in his life?
  17. 1 point
    This is a tough one. Separation anxiety/general anxiety, in our case, was the worst symptom for our daughter. I remember like it was yesterday not being able to go to the bathroom without her following. Her gran couldn't even get to take her out without mum or dad going. Luckily, it did eventually improve with 6 months of prophylaxis abx but was the last symptom to improve. Even now DD doesn't have the confidence of her peers. They are all having sleepovers etc., but DD isn't anywhere near this. Take small steps and try not to show how frustrated you are (hard as this is). It really does improve with time. You won't be at this crisis point for long. Improvement for us happened very gradually. One day at a birthday party I thought how great it was DD went off to dance on her own without holding my hand! Then she sat at the dinner table with her friends and didn't notice I wasn't stood behind her. Went to the toilet on her own without a second thought..... DD overall is 95% better since major episode 2 years ago She still takes prophylaxis for now and she will have minor relapses with viruses etc. But, despite separation anxiety being the one symptom we see decline first when she gets ill, it is nowhere near as debilitating. She just gets more nervous and on high alert for a week or two. No - she's not like her friends quite yet. But she did stay at a friend's for tea for a whole 2 hours last week without me - and didn't want to go home when I turned up to collect her! She was so proud of herself and because it went well for her (i.e. nothing 'bad' happened and mum did come back), she is now primed to do it again soon. She is actually looking forward to the next time. She will just be much older when she does all the independent things like sleepovers at friends. Word of warning though, I have been seeing a therapist to help me cope with PANDAS PTSD and I have discovered how much of an influence I can actually be on my daughter's anxiety. Without realising, I have been just as nervous as her (or worse?) at the thought of her being independent ('oh my god, she couldn't possibly do that.... worry, worry, worry.....people don't understand, that will set her right back'....etc. etc. etc.......) All those thoughts I have because I too am scarred from years of rollercoaster behaviour and trying to prevent disasters. We, as mums, have a duty to protect. This is our second nature and we do so many things we are not aware of. You are now programmed to condition the environment to your DD's needs. It doesn't matter she is getting so much better, fresh in your mind are those awful reminders of worse times. When will it happen again? Be mindful of the fact that we influence our children so much: I didn't know I was holding DD back until a stranger told me. I hope things improve for your family real soon. Hang on in there............
  18. 1 point
    Lydiasmum

    Request for success stories please!

    Hello everyone. I am struggling with positive mental attitude in any shape or form at the moment, even though my DD is in a relatively good place. The usual PANDA parent complaint - I am always looking for every little sign of a relapse. It's doing my head in. Assuming that families with the worst behind them are still using this forum, can I please ask for some good stories and how things really can change for the better. I would love to read about recoveries right now to give me something to look forward to. Thank you x
  19. 1 point
    Brese

    Request for success stories please!

    My daughter is 9 and a complete success story. When she was 7 in August she woke up one morning saying she did not want to eat. Within 3 weeks she was no longer the child I knew. Once a child who was afraid of nothing, outgoing, happy, smart as a whip child was gone. She was convinced her food was poisoned, could not leave my side, aggressive, having terrible obsessive thoughts. Her clothes were contaminated everything she touched was contaminated. She was afraid of chemicals, people everything. Her handwriting was on a preschool level, she started developing problems walking, and developed facial tics, and her hands began to turn inward. I brought her to a psychologist because I thought she had OCD. She call the psychiatrist to see her the next morning. The put her on medication, clozipam, and medication for OCD. Her behavior was worse up for 3 days straight running and screaming. The only time she was better is when taking Advil. I could not accept my daughter would wake up with OCD and researched it and found PANDAS. I decided to bring her to neurologist for a consult. She was diagnosed with PANDAS treated with antibiotic for several weeks and received IVIG December of that year. By January she started eating and walking like normal, and touching things, and wearing the same clothes, by March her facial ticks were gone. She has had no symptoms for a 1 1/2 years now. No OCD, no separation anxiety, no aggression, straight A's, handwriting is beautiful like it never happened. She continued to see the psychiatrist and psychologist for behavior therapy. That did not last long because her recovery was so fast. The psychologist never had any experience with PANDAS and is now a firm believer. She said she never saw a child who was so mentally compromised come back so quickly. She now looks for the symptoms. We are blessed that we caught this so early and found people who could help us. We decided to give her the antibiotic when we know someone has strep. However, when she gets exposed she wakes up in the morning not quite right maybe wanting to organize her closet. By the third day of the antibiotic that organization has gone away. Never thought I would say I did not want my kid to be organized. Don't give up I would recommend the IVIG it gave her life back to her.
  20. 1 point
    mwmmom

    Request for success stories please!

    My daughter just came home with a score of 100 on her math test. She is in 4th grade and doing great! She was totally overtaken by PANS 2 years ago and missed a large part of 2nd grade. Our journey is chronicled in a post titled a Message of Hope on August 28, 2012. Hang in there. You too will have a return of normalcy, but it takes time for our children. I am thankful for normal days and months each year. Please always remember to have HOPE and faith in their recovery!
  21. 1 point
    Lydiasmum

    Request for success stories please!

    Wow, thank you so much everyone. Your responses have made me smile (it's been a while). We are 18 months in to this nightmare and we have had 3 true flares and a few minor ones. Out of the 3 biggies though, I can honestly say the last 2 were not as dramatic as the first initial onset that made us sit up and say "what the *****?!" My daughter is on prophylaxis antibiotics and I use ibruprofen some days when mood is very erratic and it does seem to help a little. I have been struggling to enjoy those days and weeks that are good and this is going to change. I pray we are heading in the right direction - just like you guys! Thank you all. Keep the good stuff coming!.........
  22. 1 point
    amyjoy

    Request for success stories please!

    I love that, Nancy - The Church of Whatever Works. Would you mind if I use that phrase? Here is a copy of a success post I put on a different forum last week. Sharing successes is so important to keeping hope and faith in that all this nightmare can end, and will end, I believe, our children can heal. "A DOSE OF HOPE for everyone on this forum - my son who was sick for 7 years, and didn't even have his first ivig until he was nearly 15 years old- is not only better, but just received the official letter giving him a full four-year merit scholarship to his college of choice, and he is going. He is going off, by himself, because he's better now. There was no way to anticipate this. There was no possible way of knowing one year ago, or even 6 months ago, for certainty, that he could just go off to college like a normal kid. Please, no matter how awful it is, how sick your child is, how much you go into debt, how much you feel like dying at any given moment - please do not give up on your child or on yourself."
  23. 1 point
    We're still around off and on, though DS has been off abx for nearly 3 years now, and -- knock on wood -- things are good! He's happy, enjoys school, enjoys his friends. He's an honor student, and his team won the State VEX (robotics) championship this year, the efforts toward which had him keeping some very irregular hours (staying up late working, getting up early to travel to competitions), to no ill effects. He's now choosing colleges and looking forward to a summer program at one of his possibles . . . three weeks of engineering study on campus, like a real college student. Then back home for high school's senior year. It's been a crazy journey, and it's had its bumps, no question. But I feel pretty confident that we can continue to meet any of the challenges that pop up, what with all our experience, communities like this one, and DS's growing confidence and maturity. And I will say that none of the subsequent bumps, or flares, have been anything like the one that first put us on this road . . . much more manageable, shorter-lived, less intense. I would say know that time is an essential factor in healing, and as Nicklemama and some others have opined previously, consider joining The Church of Whatever Works! We'll all get to the other side, sooner or later!
  24. 1 point
    lnn

    Request for success stories please!

    Yay Kath!! So happy to hear! We too seem to be out of the woods. It took a long, long time and a lot of money. It was more than strep. It was more than lyme. It was a half dozen things that all intertwined. But both kids came out on the other side and seem to be holding on to the good place they've been in for quite some time. I actually seem to have achieved a long time goal and weaned myself from this forum - a place that was once more essential to me than air. I know it feels like it may never happen, but if you keep digging, keep believing in your child and in yourself, recovery does happen. Hang in there!
  25. 1 point
    Hi, My daughter is being treated by Kayleen and we like her very much. Feel free to pm me if you have specific questions. Heather


×