Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

special needs?


JennyC
 Share

Recommended Posts

My daughter has epilepsy, chronic tic disorder with vocal tics as well and sensory issues....is she considered special needs? Ive been wondering about that and have been trying to wrap my brain around it because to me special needs kids are mentally retarded or physically disabled in a wheel chair...I dont know why I even care but Im just wondering.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Special needs are needs that the typical person does not have. Any label applied or not to your child, changes nothing about who they are or what they are capable of. If you don't like the SN label- don't use it, nothing will change. You may be a bit perturbed, though, if others use it referring to your child. Humans seem to love categories and labels- helps us define, control and make sense of our world, I suppose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really dont care about the term special needs being used for my child if she is truly special needs, Im just having trouble digesting weather she is special needs or not because she is so normal to me. Like sometimes I will say to someone "my daughter has a lot of health issues", if I were asked if she was special needs, what would be the correct answer?? I dont know why I am preoccupied with this question because I highly doubt I would ever label her special needs although I wouldnt be offended if someone else called her special needs....

 

Special needs are needs that the typical person does not have. Any label applied or not to your child, changes nothing about who they are or what they are capable of. If you don't like the SN label- don't use it, nothing will change. You may be a bit perturbed, though, if others use it referring to your child. Humans seem to love categories and labels- helps us define, control and make sense of our world, I suppose.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really dont care about the term special needs being used for my child if she is truly special needs, Im just having trouble digesting weather she is special needs or not because she is so normal to me. Like sometimes I will say to someone "my daughter has a lot of health issues", if I were asked if she was special needs, what would be the correct answer??

 

I think the correct answer depends on who is asking and why. I would answer a nosy neighbor with "she has a lot of health/medical issues." But, the school would likely be asking to determine what accomodations she needs to be successful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess thats what Im asking, if the question is asked by the schools or something like that what do I say? Is she special needs? We have a meeting this week with the schools nurse, behavioral therapist, social worker and speech therapist. I know they will probably determine if she is or not but it just feels so weird to think of her as special needs because there are so many kids out there so much worse, you know?

 

I think the correct answer depends on who is asking and why. I would answer a nosy neighbor with "she has a lot of health/medical issues." But, the school would likely be asking to determine what accomodations she needs to be successful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently had that meeting at school. I asked them to keep his information private. I said I don't want others to treat him differently on a label of tourettes syndrome/PANDAS. The principal ensured that she, the school nurse, school psychologist and his teacher would be the only ones who knew about the diagnosis. The rest of the papers are in sealed files. Originally she offered us the "special needs " bus. I declined saying I want him with his neighbors. She has not met Andrew but must have a perception of tourettes based on past experience that he would need a special bus. That is a ignorant statement. I agree the diagnosis helps to get school testing and accomodations but beyond that don't seem important, if anything just give people a reason to talk about them. I don't share it with others just a select few, because they don't seem to understand anyways. Nobody who ever saw my son wuld guess he had this disorder. Like you said there are so many kids with something worse. A trip to the ped neurologist will confirm that.

 

Michele

 

I guess thats what Im asking, if the question is asked by the schools or something like that what do I say? Is she special needs? We have a meeting this week with the schools nurse, behavioral therapist, social worker and speech therapist. I know they will probably determine if she is or not but it just feels so weird to think of her as special needs because there are so many kids out there so much worse, you know?

 

I think the correct answer depends on who is asking and why. I would answer a nosy neighbor with "she has a lot of health/medical issues." But, the school would likely be asking to determine what accomodations she needs to be successful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi Jenny

I wouldnt hesitate to get special needs accomodations if I were you

 

 

 

my son had his 504 plan designed to meet his special needs and I am very thankful we had it in place as it made his life (and mine) a LOT easier at school.

 

special needs are not restricted to chronically ill or mentally challenged people

 

when something can really be of help to a child, who cares what other people think ^_^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to clear something up. Im not asking this because Im care what other people think or because Im offended that she would be called special needs. I was asking for my own knowledge because I honestly didnt know if the conditions she has puts her in the special needs category, thats all.

 

when something can really be of help to a child, who cares what other people think ^_^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jenny

I am so sorry if you misunderstood my comment as being directed at you or anyone on the thread....it was based more on a general feeling that many parents have about not telling the schools and not wanting their child "labelled" different etc etc and seemed relevant to the conversation. I was writing more from my personal feelings on the subject rather than in response to anyone specifically

 

I have seen so many kids fall thru the cracks and not get accomodations they need or be punished in class for things they cant help etc etc that I am a major advocate for getting correct accomodations in place, whether IEP, 504 plan or special needs or disability clasification...whatever works best in the specific situation. The correct classification can truly save the child a lot more needless problems than having the "label" ever could produce IMHO

 

very often kids are not getting accomodations because of parents reluctance to have them "classified"...and where i sure can understand that reluctance (been there myself) I also know how negatively it can impact the child

 

again, sorry if my comment upset you and yes, I sure did understand that you were asking if your child met special needs criteria not whether you should reveal that she does

Link to comment
Share on other sites

no no your comment didnt upset me, I just wanted to clear up for everyone my motivation for asking the question. I didnt want people feeling like I was defensive about it. I just really dont know where she stands. I guess she does fit the special needs label because of the tics, epilepsy and sensory issues but its just so hard to get that through my head not because I dont want it to be that way but because she is just so darned normal compared to my vision of the special needs child.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jenny,

 

Your post got me thinking. "Special needs" is as encompassing as the term "handicapped." Both paraplegia and a broken ankle are considered handicaps and will get you special accomodations, but they are not even in the same zip code as far as impairment goes. It is a shame that accomodations can't be made without a label.

 

Tami

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jenny,

I think maybe what you are asking is wether your daughter would be classified for "special "ED"? (as opposed to special needs, not sure if its the same thing or suggests the same thing). I suppose if she will need extra help in the way of speech therapy, ot, or an aide to give more one on one in the classroom setting, then that would be considered special ed, I think, as with under the IEP (individual education plan)?

 

My son qualifies for the 504 and they have implemented that for him (all confidential as Michele pointed out) but he is NOT special ed and does not qualify for it as a result of the testing they did back in November in order to facilitate implementation. Yes, he gets special "accomodations" to level his playing field such as extra timing, preferential seating, etc., but he does not receive any extra help in the way of academics. And also, as Michele said, no one would know looking at my son that he has any of these issues, (tics,ocd,sensory) except teachers who spend most time with him and are trained (hopefully) to be aware of these issues. And that is a GOOD thing, btw, for the teacher my son has this year has been a blessing in the way of recognizing this for what it is, and helping and guiding me to getting the proper plan implemented for him. So far so good, his issues are basically taken out of the equation and not used against him. (3 "A's" and 2 "B+" on this past report card! .. and the comment section doesn't say for the 17th time "...continues to need improvement in time management"...... Should I put THAT on the bragging thread?!! :lol::P )

 

Maybe this clarifies?

 

Faith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks Jenny...I felt real bad that you may have thought I was referring my comment at you .

 

I agree Tami, I wish schools et al would simply recognize when needs exist and accomodate "as needed" without all the hoops one has to jump thru to get the classifications/labels etc...with some school districts actually making it hard to get accommodations, even when the "labels" are attached.

 

for the record, my son does *not* like the term "special needs" although he recognized why it was beneficial on his 504.

 

Now that Tourette is classified "disability- other health impared" for the education system by law, I am hopeful things will get easier for parents having to request accommodations for tics, OCD or any of the other disorders that can frequently occur with it

http://www.tsa-usa.org/news/TOURETTEOHI0806.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My problem is that Isa has both vocal (blowing raspberries) AND motor tics but her neurologist wont say she has Tourette's because he says that the line is so fine between tic disorders that he just lumps them all together. This worries me as far as if we dont have a diagnosis how can she get the help she may need? Because of her health issues we are on medicaid (a little emarrassed about that) but they wont let us see another neurologist.

 

 

Now that Tourette is classified "disability- other health impared" for the education system by law, I am hopeful things will get easier for parents having to request accommodations for tics, OCD or any of the other disorders that can frequently occur with it

http://www.tsa-usa.org/news/TOURETTEOHI0806.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our diagnosis for the school just states "..... has motor and vocal tics, ocd, and anxiety." They obviously know this is the criteria for tourettes, they did not question it. I think only time will tell if your daughter will have these issues once starting school, and if she is able to function in a typical classroom.

 

 

Faith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...