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Sensory Integration Disorder


san70
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My ds had his 9 yo check up today. The ped is familiar with his tics. The ped mentioned sensory integration disorder. Has anyone gone through this? Ever since he was a toddler, he has been extremely sensitive to light, loud noises, tags, and other tactile issues. He would always rub his hand over things that were bumpy like my husband's stubbly beard, scabs, or even rough skin. I also read that temper outbursts are also part of it. He definitely has those and, coincidentally, his teacher just emailed me about aggressive outbursts at school. He does not like going to movie theatre since it is so loud. Many years ago, we had taken him to an IMAX show. He did not like that at all! He is physical and seems to constantly touch things. Not in an OCD manner. Whether he is pushing his brothers, or tickling his other brother, he seems to always need that physical stimulation. Could this sensory integration disorder be related to his tics? He is on a clean diet. Takes a good multi. In the past, we tried B6 and mag taurate but neither changed his tics. Epsom salts do not calm his tics, either. When he is anxious, nervous, or excited, his tics are much more evident. He is an anxious child...has always been. I am planning on getting him evaluated by an OT, per the ped's recommendation. Any ideas, suggestions, input, information would be greatly appreciated.

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hi San

 

yes, if you do a search here you will find a number of threads related to the topic of SID

 

many kids who have neurological issues also seem to have this dysfunctional stuff going on in their sensory systems

 

things like the sock seams, and labels at the neck used to drive my son into a frenzy, same with some smells, and deep bass or high treble and of course the flashing, flicker and fluorescent light trigger

 

we did find overlaps occurring when the sensory stuff became kinda morphed in with tics and OCD

 

my son had helpful occupational therapy when younger and learned some good skills like skin brushing and other sensory modulating things

 

there is an excellent book and website The Out Of Sync Child

http://www.out-of-sync-child.com/

Edited by Chemar
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I believe that we all have a bit of SID in us, quite frankly. It's our little quirks and unique things that we don't like or those things that appeal to us but don't appeal to someone else. I would not have ever thought that my aversion to eggplant or other slimy foods was a sensory issue but I also can't stand certain smells and I like to touch things in a certain way and rub silky things between my fingers. My dh can't stand noise. Any kind of noise. He has aversions to certain foods that don't make sense to me: ketchup? I mean what's wrong with ketchup??? He puts mayo on his fries! Blech! He also used to rub his blanket on his nose and twirl his finger in his belly button when he was a little boy. He has to have packages opened a certain way and he MUST have the fridge organized. Now, this is where I think SID crosses to OCD, but I'm no expert and he's never been officially diagnosed. But, man he sure is picky about how things are done around the house. I was so laid back when I married him, I had NO idea what I was in for, LOL!

 

As for my ds: I do believe we have sensory issues with him, too. He hates movie theaters and is sensitive to bass. Hates it when I use wine to cook b/c he says it has a nasty smell! He likes to rub his bedding against his lip when he's falling asleep, etc. But, we don't have any problems with outbursts or anger with him. He's extremely mild mannered and gregarious. We do, however, have anxiety issues sometimes and the tics. So, we're all unique in our own ways, aren't we? As my grandmother used to say(after I refused to eat her sweet potato marshmallow dish), "To each their own".

 

Bonnie

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Hi I just finished a book on this subject last night.Its The Sensory-Sensitive Child by Karen A. Smith, Ph.D &Karen R. Gouze, Ph.D. Its written by 2moms with sons with this,they both are therapists and professors of clinical psychology. I found the book very helpful,my dd 5yrs also has some sensory issues,Im anxious to get her to an OT now that Im hearing such good things about it and I do see the results of some of the things weve just done as coping stradagies.I think learning about this issue will give you a new percerption of many behavioral issues,and it seems just that alone can bring about some fast improvement in some of the daily struggles we all go through. And just incase you dont read the book heres a message from one of the writers sons, now 15--He wants parents to know it does get better.I could be wrong but I beleive he had 18 mo. of OT Angela

Edited by kengela
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Hi Bonnie :)

 

I do agree we all have our own sensory likes and dislikes etc....the difference tho with SID is that it can interfere with the quality of life, so making it i very real disorder rather than just individual quirks kwim

 

my son's OCD would kick in big time when there was the issue with the seams of the socks having to be "just right" in the way they felt or he "could not" wear them etc etc

 

a high pitched squeal of static on a microphone gives me the heeby jeebies, but for him...it once sent him into major overdrive :blink:

 

clinical SID really is best dx and treated if it is interfering with regular functioning IMHO

 

 

I believe that we all have a bit of SID in us, quite frankly. It's our little quirks and unique things that we don't like or those things that appeal to us but don't appeal to someone else. I would not have ever thought that my aversion to eggplant or other slimy foods was a sensory issue but I also can't stand certain smells and I like to touch things in a certain way and rub silky things between my fingers. My dh can't stand noise. Any kind of noise. He has aversions to certain foods that don't make sense to me: ketchup? I mean what's wrong with ketchup??? He puts mayo on his fries! Blech! He also used to rub his blanket on his nose and twirl his finger in his belly button when he was a little boy. He has to have packages opened a certain way and he MUST have the fridge organized. Now, this is where I think SID crosses to OCD, but I'm no expert and he's never been officially diagnosed. But, man he sure is picky about how things are done around the house. I was so laid back when I married him, I had NO idea what I was in for, LOL!

 

As for my ds: I do believe we have sensory issues with him, too. He hates movie theaters and is sensitive to bass. Hates it when I use wine to cook b/c he says it has a nasty smell! He likes to rub his bedding against his lip when he's falling asleep, etc. But, we don't have any problems with outbursts or anger with him. He's extremely mild mannered and gregarious. We do, however, have anxiety issues sometimes and the tics. So, we're all unique in our own ways, aren't we? As my grandmother used to say(after I refused to eat her sweet potato marshmallow dish), "To each their own".

 

Bonnie

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Actually, being an Occupational Therapist who specializes in Sensory Integrative Disorder, I can definitely speak to this question. Yes, DIS does cause functional limitations, and makes it very difficult for the child (and/or adult) to self regulate. Think of the child who is constantly out of his/her seat in school, moving around, putting his/her hands over ears, can't stand certain textures, certain foods (and/or types of foods,) etc. It makes it very difficult to focus and attend to task. These people tend to set up rituals to deal with their sensory problems (could look like OCD), and so they learn, in time to use these rituals to be able to function. Yes, we all have our issues, but where it becomes difficult to function, is where we call it Sensory Integrative Disorder.

 

Find a good Pediatric Occupational Therapist who specializes is treating Sensory Integrative Disorder. Some therapists are certified, but it honestly does not matter if they are certified, IF they have a lot of experience (personally, I rather have one who has years of experience, and really understands what s/he is doing and seeing, rather than someone with just a very few years of experience, and just got his/her certification (that's my personal opinion, having done this for over 15 years!)

 

Anyway, ask around, and be willing to ask lots of questions. Ask what kind of evaluations they do (there are standardized evaluations + you want someone who can also evaluate functionally...know what they are seeing, and be able to explain it to you so you understand). They should be able to set up a good "sensory diet" for you to do at home (really a cool term for a sensory program tailored to your child's individual sensory needs, and constantly reassessed, and changed as the child's needs change (and the child's sensory needs will change as they improve.) It is a VERY effective treatment when done right.

 

My DS with PANDAS and my DS with PANDAS and Asperger's both have Sensory Integrative Disorder, and we are constantly doing what we can to help them. Keep in mind that when they get sick, the Sensory System does have it's own flare ups. Sensory Integrative tx does not CURE the problem...just makes it manageable, and helps the person function. Actually, though, when the child is started as an infant, the brain can be rewired, and many of the symptom do go away!

 

Good luck.

 

Trudy

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I just took my non-pandas daughter (6 years) to Dr. Murphy for an evaluation yesterday. She having some mild panda symptoms and has always had sensory issues, especially with tags, tight clothes and her hearing. She suggested OT if the sensory issues become a real problem, but is also mentioned iron and zinc defiances could be a part of the problem. She's doing a lot of blood work that includes checking her iron and zinc. I'm not sure if anyone has heard of these defiances with sensory issues?

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I just took my non-pandas daughter (6 years) to Dr. Murphy for an evaluation yesterday. She having some mild panda symptoms and has always had sensory issues, especially with tags, tight clothes and her hearing. She suggested OT if the sensory issues become a real problem, but is also mentioned iron and zinc defiances could be a part of the problem. She's doing a lot of blood work that includes checking her iron and zinc. I'm not sure if anyone has heard of these defiances with sensory issues?

 

 

My spell check went nuts... I meant deficiencies, not defiances :)

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Thanks to everyone for all the replies. Well, based on what you have said, it doesn't appear that my ds has SID because his quirks do not interfere with his functioning. Maybe they are just quirks. So, where does that leave me now? Do I try to approach this with a behavioral psychologist with his anger issues? Just this evening, I said to my dh that I feel so ineffective as a mom because it seems that nothing works. When my ds had a meltdown tonight, and was very angry, he later on told me that he tries to take deep breaths but only after the fact, not during the moment. I guess it's good that he is trying and recognizes this. I just don't know what to do to help him. I feel like I am missing something. Any thoughts?

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san

 

SID isnt always going to interfere with functioning significantly but it can cause mood meltdowns indirectly

 

it can have really subtle effects as well as glaringly obvious ones

 

really is worth checking into as it is common in kids with neuro issues

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