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Mayzoo

Anti-inflammatory diet....swapping resources thread

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Please feel free to discuss anything anti-inflammatory diet related.

 

We are just starting down this path, and I am doubtful hubby will conform to it, sooooo just kiddo and I. Of course She has PANDAS and autism along with a wheel barrow full of viruses. She is cronically fatigued right now. I have joint pains and headaches. Her and I take herbs for inflammation as well; she takes many more than I.

 

I am stocking up on quinoa, 16 bean soup mixes, and various brown rices (see below for what I already grow). Anything else I should add that will not cost an arm and a leg?

 

Who else here is trying it?

 

Any stories to relate good/bad/indifferent?

 

Is everyone in your house tring it, or just some?

 

We are hoping to try it without costing a lot more than how we eat already, I just want to sub the money I spend on pastas, white rice, empty carbs, sugary stuff, etc for the good stuff. We don't eat pre-packaged much. Any experiences on cost?

 

Information I have that I can share about:

 

Foods/food growing methods I can share about--we grow organically:

 

We already grow/process various sprouts, squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, okra, egg plant, sweet potatos (morning glory family--not nightshades), cantelope, watermelons, celery, collard greens, green peppers, banana peppers, strawberries, blackberries and various common culinary herbs. We have a small orchard that is still very young. We have a pond I can fish out of. I have been making milk kefir for about a year, and I am fairly well read on this subjects.

 

Equipment I am familiar with:

 

Rapid wave oven (like a nu-wave)

Crock pot

Presto Multi cooker (like a crock pot, but can also cook on higher temps as well--up to 400 deg)

Food processor

Blender

Hand crank Meat grinder

Yogurt machine

 

Books I have or have ordered:

 

*The Complete Idiot's Guide Anti-Inflammation Cookbook (Idiot's Guides) On order

*Meals That Heal Inflammation: Embrace Healthy Living and Eliminate Pain, One Meal at at Time On order

*Recipes Healthy: Low Carb and Anti Inflammatory (fairly common ingredients)

*The Inflammation Diet for Beginners: 100 Essential Anti-Inflammatory Diet Recipes (less common ingredients)

Edited by mayzoo

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with neurological problems, it is good to add fat. fish oil, for sure.

I can't give you an advice only my belief that meat is fine and more than fine for people with neurological problems.

One thing you don't mention is soup. We make soup out of bones -- any bones but pork. We have this organic farm with lamb and goat and they charge $1.00 a pound for even marrow bones. If you can find something like that, you'll have the best inexpensive meal you can imagine.

 

we organize our meals around meat. Meat is not expensive. We use organic chicken and pork. Pulled pork is an easy one to make in the crock pot.

I also grill a lot of pork tenderloin. If you don't overdo it, it tastes great. Burger, sausages -- heaven! make kids happy.

Polenta is easy to make -- esp if you start 3 minute package.

Anything Chinese -- kids love those thin noodles that you can eat alone with little soy sauce or in a soup.

 

I grill ones a week and freeze what we don't eat the first day.

Fish, of course.

I would stay away from tomato and papers. We eat potato no more than ones a week.

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Tomatos are in the nightshade category, and are high alkaloids foods, which are hard to digest for some people. However, the plan I am trying to follow is by Dr. Weil and he recommends increasing tomato intake.

 

When comparing resources, it can get very confusing. Do the research, then ultimatley, like everything else, you have to make the best choices you can.

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with neurological problems, it is good to add fat. fish oil, for sure.

I can't give you an advice only my belief that meat is fine and more than fine for people with neurological problems.

One thing you don't mention is soup. We make soup out of bones -- any bones but pork. We have this organic farm with lamb and goat and they charge $1.00 a pound for even marrow bones. If you can find something like that, you'll have the best inexpensive meal you can imagine.

 

we organize our meals around meat. Meat is not expensive. We use organic chicken and pork. Pulled pork is an easy one to make in the crock pot.

I also grill a lot of pork tenderloin. If you don't overdo it, it tastes great. Burger, sausages -- heaven! make kids happy.

Polenta is easy to make -- esp if you start 3 minute package.

Anything Chinese -- kids love those thin noodles that you can eat alone with little soy sauce or in a soup.

 

I grill ones a week and freeze what we don't eat the first day.

Fish, of course.

I would stay away from tomato and papers. We eat potato no more than ones a week.

 

Yeah, we are increasing our protien intake on the whole with beans and lean meats. We eat a lot of chicken now, and will be taking the skins off from now on. I will be able to get fish in maybe once a week.

 

We love to grill too, and soups are definately a staple around here in the winter especially.

 

Thanks!

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with neurological problems, it is good to add fat. fish oil, for sure.

I can't give you an advice only my belief that meat is fine and more than fine for people with neurological problems.

One thing you don't mention is soup. We make soup out of bones -- any bones but pork. We have this organic farm with lamb and goat and they charge $1.00 a pound for even marrow bones. If you can find something like that, you'll have the best inexpensive meal you can imagine.

 

we organize our meals around meat. Meat is not expensive. We use organic chicken and pork. Pulled pork is an easy one to make in the crock pot.

I also grill a lot of pork tenderloin. If you don't overdo it, it tastes great. Burger, sausages -- heaven! make kids happy.

Polenta is easy to make -- esp if you start 3 minute package.

Anything Chinese -- kids love those thin noodles that you can eat alone with little soy sauce or in a soup.

 

I grill ones a week and freeze what we don't eat the first day.

Fish, of course.

I would stay away from tomato and papers. We eat potato no more than ones a week.

 

Yeah, we are increasing our protien intake on the whole with beans and lean meats. We eat a lot of chicken now, and will be taking the skins off from now on. I will be able to get fish in maybe once a week.

 

We love to grill too, and soups are definately a staple around here in the winter especially.

 

Thanks!

 

just to comment on protein part of the quotations: yes, and FAT. fats apparently good for brain and the nervous system.

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Kiddo loves peanut butter, and she takes 2-3 double strength Omega 3's with the high ratio. I also cook with coconut oil and olive oil instead of magarine now. I think she is doing pretty well on fat content....now I just need to make sure she is consuming more monounsaturated vs saturated.

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You are so lucky to have a wonderful vegetable garden! We frequent the Farmer's Market every week. If you are eating Organic or grass fed meat the skin and fat are good for you. Grass Fed has Omega 3 compared to grain fed Omega 6 even if it is organic grain. Wonder if we didn't change mother nature and how we feed animals if our country would be in such a health crisis. A stronger immune system wouldn't need so many vaccines.

 

Our immunologist doesn't let us have brown rice. He has found allergy numbers are higher on the kids inflammation markers.

 

We do lots of nuts but not peanuts. They come with a lot of mycotoxins and I learned at the conference are heavily sprayed with pesticides. Our son traded this for almond butter mixed with mexican chocolate. No sugar. We get ours at the Farmer's Market. I also use this in smoothies and on Banana chunks for a snack.

 

I ate a bun the other day and had arthritis the next morning. I actually had forgotten how sore and weak my hands can get.

 

Wish you luck. It has helped us so much.

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