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Has anyone had experience with OAT test?


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Hello,

With all of Gaby's symptoms right now, I am trying to rule out what I can and yeast is a possibility due to the abx and the type of behavior she has. I looked up OAT test and yeast c&s and they sound like very valuable tests which can find out more than just about yeast, but even other problems with metabolism and metal intoxication, etc. I would really like to do this, but it is very expensive for the combo ($280) If I am going to invest that kind of money, I want to be sure that it is legit - if these people at this lab aren't just trying to get your money and make up a bunch of results - especially if they can then recommend anti-yeast products that maybe they will get some profit from. The company is called Great Plains Laboratories, I think. They do the tests and the consultation for the fee mentioned above. What does anybody know about this? Pat

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Pmoreno,

 

Great Plains has an excellant reputation as far as I know. The problem with yeast testing, has been a disagreement amongst labs (metametrix/direct lab & Great Plains) as to what metabolite is really the correct one to test for candida overgrowth. I don't know if that issue has ever really been resolved. You can visit Great Plains web site and read how they came about believing that their test was valid. Many, many within the DAN community use their testing and seem to have positives when following the recommendations. Physician assisted is always best if you can afford, and you have someone who really understands the results!

 

You might want to try the TS forum and use the search feature. Claire (and others) who used to post frequently had some really great threads regarding labs/testing. If you decide to do the test, get as educated as you can prior to your consultation. I'm still learning what some of the things my son was tested for, thru metametrix, years ago could indicate. One thing that has occured to me, like CP's son's results, his test seemed to indicate that he had very little good OR bad gut stuff.

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Pmoreno,

 

Great Plains has an excellant reputation as far as I know. The problem with yeast testing, has been a disagreement amongst labs (metametrix/direct lab & Great Plains) as to what metabolite is really the correct one to test for candida overgrowth. I don't know if that issue has ever really been resolved. You can visit Great Plains web site and read how they came about believing that their test was valid. Many, many within the DAN community use their testing and seem to have positives when following the recommendations. Physician assisted is always best if you can afford, and you have someone who really understands the results!

 

You might want to try the TS forum and use the search feature. Claire (and others) who used to post frequently had some really great threads regarding labs/testing. If you decide to do the test, get as educated as you can prior to your consultation. I'm still learning what some of the things my son was tested for, thru metametrix, years ago could indicate. One thing that has occured to me, like CP's son's results, his test seemed to indicate that he had very little good OR bad gut stuff.

 

Thanks for the info. One thing I'm always concerned about with any of these things is that I wonder if you get all kinds of false positives so that they have something to talk about in their consultation and possibly even pushing products that they would get financial gain from. I don't know, I'm just a little skeptical. I sometimes think that people use us parents to their advantage - knowing that we're desperate to find out what's going on with our kids and willing to pay any price and they come up with all kinds of wild things that maybe aren't completely proven scientifically. It seems like if they were, more mainstream doctors would use them. Another one that someone on here was doing is dry blood analysis. I read a little about it, but its pretty complicated reading and I really don't understand it. Again, its one of those things where you wonder how they can possibly come up with the diagnoses and results that they do from just looking at a drop of blood under a microscope. I would hope that all these diagnostic methods are on the up and up, but I can't help thinking that its too good to be true. Pat

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Pmoreno,

 

As Ad ccl said, your Dr. can speak with them. If you want, you could do a conference call so you can both be involved.

 

I think you would feel a lot better if you looked at a few things regarding Great Plains. I had all of the same thoughts you are when first starting down this road.

 

Check out this site with Dr. Shaws (Director of Great Plains) credentials

 

This just does not strike me as a man who has to make his fortunes pushing vitamins, or even deal with the hassles of going outside of the box. He worked for the CDC at one point. I'm thinking this was when it was still somewhat of a creadible agency, which I personally no longer believe.

 

If I remember right, he has an older autistic step daughter. I got on their mailing list somehow, and the news letter is pretty impressive. The last one that I read talked about his daughter having an egg allergy and how they removed it from her diet and she got worse. I think the problem was low cholesterol, and the loss of egg from her diet created more problems than the allergy or sensitivity (can't remember which) caused. Anyway, I think their testing can be very beneficial. As I said earlier, my problem lies more in finding a good Dr. to help interpret without paying $300.00 consultation fees.

 

Notice on the website, it says that ordering needs to be thru a licensed healthcare provider. In some states that can be a chiropractor, nutritionist etc. If you don't want to pay a Dr. and can gain enough knowledge on your own, you can do it a lot cheaper. Ideally, that's not the way to go, but I got sick of paying people who seemed to have very basic knowledge. Our area is not loaded with this type of Dr. tho either. Real slim pickens around here, so travel was required along with all of the other expense. The one guy that I really liked (alternative type Dr), retired midstream without ever having told me of his intentions.

 

Here are some links. I haven't been to that site for a while. It looks like quite a bit has changed. A lot of the old background info. on testing isn't there anymore, must be in a different format on "documentation link" which I didn't read.

 

 

Director of Great Plains

 

Resume of sorts

 

http://www.icimed.com/DrCV2008/SHAWCV.pdf

 

WILLIAM SHAW, Ph.D.

 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL 1971 - 1978

Atlanta, Georgia

Supervisory Research Chemist

Nutritional Biochemistry and Endocrinology

Served as chief of the radioimmunoassay laboratory and directed development of reference methods for

radioimmunoassays, such as thyroxine and digoxin. Techniques used include radiolabeling, preparation of

antigenic conjugates, and tittering of antisera. Important theoretical work was the development of the

mathematical basis for the treatment of RIA data. The digoxin method developed was used as the national

reference method for digoxin.

 

 

http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/testkits.html

 

Documentation on the validity of organic acid tests

 

http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/newevidence/index.html

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Pmoreno,

 

As Ad ccl said, your Dr. can speak with them. If you want, you could do a conference call so you can both be involved.

 

I think you would feel a lot better if you looked at a few things regarding Great Plains. I had all of the same thoughts you are when first starting down this road.

 

Check out this site with Dr. Shaws (Director of Great Plains) credentials

 

This just does not strike me as a man who has to make his fortunes pushing vitamins, or even deal with the hassles of going outside of the box. He worked for the CDC at one point. I'm thinking this was when it was still somewhat of a creadible agency, which I personally no longer believe.

 

If I remember right, he has an older autistic step daughter. I got on their mailing list somehow, and the news letter is pretty impressive. The last one that I read talked about his daughter having an egg allergy and how they removed it from her diet and she got worse. I think the problem was low cholesterol, and the loss of egg from her diet created more problems than the allergy or sensitivity (can't remember which) caused. Anyway, I think their testing can be very beneficial. As I said earlier, my problem lies more in finding a good Dr. to help interpret without paying $300.00 consultation fees.

 

Notice on the website, it says that ordering needs to be thru a licensed healthcare provider. In some states that can be a chiropractor, nutritionist etc. If you don't want to pay a Dr. and can gain enough knowledge on your own, you can do it a lot cheaper. Ideally, that's not the way to go, but I got sick of paying people who seemed to have very basic knowledge. Our area is not loaded with this type of Dr. tho either. Real slim pickens around here, so travel was required along with all of the other expense. The one guy that I really liked (alternative type Dr), retired midstream without ever having told me of his intentions.

 

Here are some links. I haven't been to that site for a while. It looks like quite a bit has changed. A lot of the old background info. on testing isn't there anymore, must be in a different format on "documentation link" which I didn't read.

 

 

Director of Great Plains

 

Resume of sorts

 

http://www.icimed.com/DrCV2008/SHAWCV.pdf

 

WILLIAM SHAW, Ph.D.

 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL 1971 - 1978

Atlanta, Georgia

Supervisory Research Chemist

Nutritional Biochemistry and Endocrinology

Served as chief of the radioimmunoassay laboratory and directed development of reference methods for

radioimmunoassays, such as thyroxine and digoxin. Techniques used include radiolabeling, preparation of

antigenic conjugates, and tittering of antisera. Important theoretical work was the development of the

mathematical basis for the treatment of RIA data. The digoxin method developed was used as the national

reference method for digoxin.

 

 

http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/testkits.html

 

Documentation on the validity of organic acid tests

 

http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/newevidence/index.html

 

 

Thanks for all the great info! Pat

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