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toosilly

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Everything posted by toosilly

  1. Luke, I have no idea what's going on differently in the brain of a "counter" than in the brain of a "non-counter", but if you ever find out (and have ideas of how to use it practically), PLEASE let us know! Caryn, I don't think anyone can tell you what age they were when they started this because we were all too young to monitor our thoughts back then. I think a tendency to play brain games can be an okay thing if the anxiety levels in life can be kept low. In other words, I think my brain games only became a problem when I got really stressed out - then I released some of that tens
  2. SORRY!! My computer's all wickety-wack right now, and it sometimes just doesn't finish sending a message, so I'm afraid I tried to send it three times...and apparently they all worked!! Murphy's Law, huh??!?
  3. Well please let us all know what the "mental health" people let you know. Just don't succumb to feeling like you're whacko, or that the syndrome is your "fault" somehow. No stigma allowed! It'll just make you more stressed, and bottom line, it's just not true. You had a pre-disposition to this. Some factors in your life (family issues growing up) probably contributed to it. Anyone else with the same brain/experiences would be having the same reaction you are. I'll be very interested to find out what the "pros" decide you're dealing with, and what they suggest you do about it. I've b
  4. Well please let us all know what the "mental health" people let you know. Just don't succumb to feeling like you're whacko, or that the syndrome is your "fault" somehow. No stigma allowed! It'll just make you more stressed, and bottom line, it's just not true. You had a pre-disposition to this. Some factors in your life (family issues growing up) probably contributed to it. Anyone else with the same brain/experiences would be having the same reaction you are. I'll be very interested to find out what the "pros" decide you're dealing with, and what they suggest you do about it. I've b
  5. Well please let us all know what the "mental health" people let you know. Just don't succumb to feeling like you're whacko, or that the syndrome is your "fault" somehow. No stigma allowed! It'll just make you more stressed, and bottom line, it's just not true. You had a pre-disposition to this. Some factors in your life (family issues growing up) probably contributed to it. Anyone else with the same brain/experiences would be having the same reaction you are. I'll be very interested to find out what the "pros" decide you're dealing with, and what they suggest you do about it. I've b
  6. Ah Ruby, please don't make your stress level worse by thinking you're going crazy: 1. Your brain is just overstimulated. 2. Some of us are just wired with this predisposition. 3. Our bodies have to get rid of the excess energy racing around in our body, so our brains have come up with this ingenious way to use it up. 4. It just becomes problematic when it starts to add to our stress, which is bound to happen eventually. 5. You HAVE to get exercise. It's a healthy way to get rid of some of that excess energy. 6. Cut out the caffeine. 7. Talk to your doctor about trying an anti-a
  7. Ah Ruby, please don't make your stress level worse by thinking you're going crazy: 1. Your brain is just overstimulated. 2. Some of us are just wired with this predisposition. 3. Our bodies have to get rid of the excess energy racing around in our body, so our brains have come up with this ingenious way to use it up. 4. It just becomes problematic when it starts to add to our stress, which is bound to happen eventually. 5. You HAVE to get exercise. It's a healthy way to get rid of some of that excess energy. 6. Cut out the caffeine. 7. Talk to your doctor about trying an anti-a
  8. Thanks for the info, Chemar (and for all the other info you've given us, too!) raq: Being particularly bright does tend to separate you from the rest of the flock. I'm guessing your son may be very creative, too. If you can help him experiment with different creative outlets, he may find one that he just loves, and sometimes having a creative outlet like that is really therapeutic. And it gives you a "niche" (it's something you know you're good at, it's part of your separate identity) and that always help self esteem. And it opens doors to hang out with like-minded people. So, just an
  9. e.i.e., your brain-typing thing sounds so much like mine, except that I don't bunch things into threes, I just make sure everything's even on both sides of the keyboard. I'm sure that particular brain exercise started when I learned how to type (in early high school), but I know I'd already started doing weird word things way before that time. My friends and family get a big kick out of my ability to tell them instantly how many letters are in a word too, but they've labeled me an "idiot savant". (They're just jealous...) ThomasJames, as far as meds, I only know about Lexapro, which (I
  10. Good, I'm glad to hear you're not opposed to taking meds, they really can help. As I said, I take a low-dose Lexapro every day, and it helps, but it doesn't take it away. I still have to exercise (I think this is THE most helpful advice of all, besides the meds), try to avoid too much caffeine, etc. All these things keep me from feeling crazy-anxious, but I still can't turn off my brain as much as I'd like to. I still do the letter-balancing thing, and some other tic things, too. If your doctor suggests a certain medication, please share it with us on this blog. I really can't imagine wh
  11. Okay ThomasJames, here's the deal: Your brain is on hyper-drive!! You need to figure out what it takes to calm it down when it gets like this. I recommend: 1. Exercise. Something that really works up a sweat and tires you out. MAJORLY helpful. 2. Medication. Nothing outrageous, just talk to your doctor and tell him you're doing obsessive/compulsive things with your brain, and you need some rest. He'll probably prescibe an anti-anxiety med, and then monitor you for awhile until you get the dosage right for you. Don't let the stigma of "being on meds" keep you from doing this. It
  12. Hi Susan - I'm 50 years old, and have done this "counting" thing since I was a kid. I remember when I was about 10, I was sitting on my dad's lap and he heard me saying something under my breath, and asked about it. I was "saying" the alphabet as though it were a long word all strung together. He cracked up and thought I was a genius. I count letters in words, I "type" words and balance them (left and right) with punctuation, etc. I actually think it's a combination of intelligence and anxiety. And I think it's also a combo of genetics and environment. So...all that to say, I tr
  13. Hi Susan - I'm 50 years old, and have done this "counting" thing since I was a kid. I remember when I was about 10, I was sitting on my dad's lap and he heard me saying something under my breath, and asked about it. I was "saying" the alphabet as though it were a long word all strung together. He cracked up and thought I was a genius. I count letters in words, I "type" words and balance them (left and right) with punctuation, etc. I actually think it's a combination of intelligence and anxiety. And I think it's also a combo of genetics and environment. So...all that to say, I tr
  14. Oh happy day that I've found this site! Hi everyone. I'm a constant letter-counter, and Russell, I totally do the typewriter thing all the time too, making sure there are the same amount of letters (in the word) on the left side of the typewriter as on the right, and if there's not, I add spaces or a period or whatever to even it out - I feel like such a WEIRDO! My brain does NOT like to be still. While people are talking, I'm doing weird brain things with the words they're saying. Geez Louise. (So what's this about candida in my system? If that's fueling this, how do I get rid of it
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