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info about probiotics containing strep


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I saw this info posted somewhere else and thought I should post it here since there has been a lot of chatter about probiotics lately. I don't know what to think, I'm still avoiding certain probiotics even though my dd has never reacted negatively........ I just don't want to take a chance right now because we're bad off anyway.

 

Just passing this along....from Brainchild Nutritionals summer newsletter:

 

Why Is There Strep in my Probiotics?

 

Our Maximum Strength Probiotics include Streptococcus Thermophilus (S. Thermophilus). Customers often ask us why this is included. Sometimes people hear that streptococcal infections can contribute to some neurological disorders, they wonder why we would put S. Thermophilus in our probiotics, and whether it could possibly cause infection.

 

Only one strain of Strep, S. Pyogenes, has been shown to cause immunological reactivity in PANDAS or ASD patients. The strain in our probiotics, S. Thermophilus, is fundamentally different, on a cellular level, than S. Pyogenes. S. Thermophilus has followed a completely different evolutionary path from S. Pyogenes and other pathogenic strains of Strep, and lacks fundamental elements that would allow it to be a pathogen.

 

 

Important Facts About Streptococcus Thermophilus:

S. Pyogenes contains a specific M protein, which autistic children have demonstrated an immune reactivity to. This protein is not present in S. Thermophilus.

Of the more than 60 different microbial peptides that have been reported to cross-react with human brain tissue, none are derived from S. Thermophilus.

The virulence factor Streptolysin O to which the human immune system produces Antistreptolysin O (ASO) to, is only expressed by S. Pyogenes, and has never been associated with S. Thermophilus. Therefore elevated ASO titers should not be considered indicative of the presence of S. Thermophilus.

Not only has all the data indicated that both PANDAS and ASD are associated solely with S. Pyogenes, the evidence shows that no other species of Streptoccocus ever been implicated in either of these disorders. In fact, research has shown that S. Thermophilus, along with other probiotic organisms, may actually improve the body's resistance to pathogens such as S. Pyogenes.

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I don't really have an opinion on this, just a couple of thoughts.

 

From the statement above

 

Only one strain of Strep, S. Pyogenes, has been shown to cause immunological reactivity in PANDAS or ASD patients. The strain in our probiotics, S. Thermophilus, is fundamentally different, on a cellular level, than S. Pyogenes.
To the best of my knowledge, N acetylglucosamine has been shown to be the reactive epitope in the cell wall of S Pyrogenes that causes the cross reactivity with human tissue.

 

Looking at this statement regarding S thermophilus makes me wonder...

 

http://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/St...us_thermophilus

 

Streptococcus thermophilus is a gram-positive bacterium; the cell wall is composed of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N-acetylmuranic acid (NAM), which is bond by ether bonds. This unique structure allows S. thermophilus to endure elevated temperatures, which is useful for many industrial dairy fermentations requiring the process of milk at higher temperatures.

 

Ok, s thermophilus does contain NAG in it's cell wall too, but would antibodies that are coded for s pyrogens necessairly attack s thermophilus?

 

Then this statement

 

Furthermore, S. thermophilus lacks genes or contain pseudogenes expressing surface protein (excluding lipoproteins); pathogenic streptococci use these surface proteins to adhere to mucosal surfaces and evade host defense mechanisms. [surface protein such as sortase-anchored surface proteins, an important virulence factor of pathogenic streptococci, is not present on the surface of S. thermophilus.]

 

Does s thermophilis adhere (colonize)? If antibodies do recognize it, what happens in a gut devoid of s thermophilis?

 

The food industry uses lactic acid bacteria, such as S. thermophilus, for their proteolytic ability to grow and hydrolyze milk proteins (casein).

 

Could this a problem with the ability to break down casein?

Edited by kim
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My understanding (which could be incorrect) from Dr Cunningham's presentation at AO is that there are 12-14 strains of strep (out of more tan 100+) that can trigger neuropsych symptoms. So it makes me believe that S. thermophilis is safe.

 

Anyone with a connection to Dr Cunningham or Kathy want to run this by them?

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Then this statement

 

Furthermore, S. thermophilus lacks genes or contain pseudogenes expressing surface protein (excluding lipoproteins); pathogenic streptococci use these surface proteins to adhere to mucosal surfaces and evade host defense mechanisms. [surface protein such as sortase-anchored surface proteins, an important virulence factor of pathogenic streptococci, is not present on the surface of S. thermophilus.]

 

Does s thermophilis adhere (colonize)? If antibodies do recognize it, what happens in a gut devoid of s thermophilis?

 

The food industry uses lactic acid bacteria, such as S. thermophilus, for their proteolytic ability to grow and hydrolyze milk proteins (casein).

 

Could this a problem with the ability to break down casein?

 

so are you saying that, the lack of s.thermo in the gut causes the inability to break down casein...?

or are you saying because s.thermo is used in the dairy process..we are getting s.thermo that way..and the body can't get rid of it?

are you saying that there isn't s.thermo in the body at all naturally?

Can you translate your thought, i can't get my head around it....

would that be a reason why ds came up slightly allergic to casein?

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 years later...

I just discovered that DD's probiotic, KIaire Labs' Ther-Biotic Complete Powder, has streptococcus thermophilus which Klaire says does not affect PANDAS/PANS: http://www.klaire.com/images/PANDAS.pdf.

 

But I see that some practitioners advise against it.

 

I am curious about any recent thoughts about this?? DD has been on this supplement every single day for YEARS, as in I can't remember when I put her on it, and she's 9yo. It's the only supp I have never discontinued.

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