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Guest Guest_Kimberly
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Guest Guest_Kimberly

Heather,

My reference range is also <8. I have a call into Pfeiffer, they haven't returned my call yet. I need to know if I should be alarmed by her high aluminum count.

Thanks,

Kimberly

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Mercola just did something on teflon coatings...

http://www.mercola.com/2004/oct/23/teflon.htm

 

Look what he said on stainless steel!

 

"Further, I recommend avoiding stainless steel because of the potential aluminum toxicity that has been linked to Alzheimer's disease. Although aluminum pots are probably less problematic than other sources of aluminum like drinking water and antiperspirants, I personally would not use aluminum cookware."

 

Claire

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I dont quite understand why aluminum would be a problem in cookware that doesnt contain aluminum??? Perhaps he is referring to aluminum cookware that is merely coated with stainless steel :unsure:

 

There is NO aluminum in the copper bottomed stainless steel cookware that I use.

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Guest Guest_efgh

Chemar and others

 

more on stainless from Dr mercola..

 

Dr. Mercola's Comment

 

Stainless steel may not be the most inert substance to use. This study, which is clearly not related at all to cooking, does show that sensitive individuals can have adverse reactions to stainless steel devises placed into their body for coronrary artery disease.

 

 

As far as stents go, the best thing to do is to avoid them in the first place. One of the best ways to do so is to follow the food choice recommendations, get proper exercise, and get plenty of sleep.

 

 

What most physicians do not realize is that nickel is every bit as toxic as mercury and some physicians believe that nickel is actually more toxic than mercury. Nickel comes from a German word for malicious or capricious spirit, sometimes meaning the devil.

 

 

It is well known from the literature that some of the ions which are released from these devises are able to destroy or damage enzymes and proteins, in addition to causing allergic reactions.

 

 

Clearly there is a quantitative element involved and I can not begin to guess how many nickel ions are liberated during the cooking process with stainless steel cookware. Clearly this is better than aluminum, which should be definitely avoided. The best cookware would be ceramic-coated metal as the ceramic is virtually inert and will not transfer any metal ions to the food you cook.

 

 

If you use Teflon coated cookware, you should be aware that there is some evidence that fluoride can be released. Plan on discarding most all Teflon coated cookware after about one year of regular use. As soon as a scratch develops on the surface this cookware will start to leach aluminum as that is the typical metal used beneath most Teflon coated cookware.

 

Stainless steel alloys all contain nickel, chromium, molybdenum, iron, carbon, and various other metals. In addition, higher temperatures will always increase the rate of leaching. Unfortunately, I don't know of any studies on this subject.

 

However, contact time has to be considered as well. The stents are in place inside the body and subjected to an environment that will solubilize almost anything, where the cookware is only subjected to any given batch of food for a very short period.

 

Dr. Ray Peat is the biochemist who helped Dr. John Lee understand natural progesterone. According to Dr. Peat, there are two kinds of stainless steel -- one kind is attracted to magnets, the other kind is not. You want to buy only the magnetically-attractive type of stainless steel, which apparently has a very low nickel content and does not leach nickel into food.

 

Here is some additional evidence of the fact that magnetized steel is safer. The following two links http://www.chenbros.com.tw/page13.htm http://www.chenbros.com.tw/page14.htm

are from a company that produces stainless steel cookware and clearly demonstrates that then magnetized version has no nickel. Nickel is likely more toxic than mercury and the main reason for concern with stainless steel cookware.

 

Lastly, the pH of the food has an impact as well. A more acidic food may leach more from the cookware

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Boy, just when you think you have a handle on everything Mercola comes along.

 

I've just spent a fortune on my new copper bottom stainless steel no aluminum pots.

I have no idea if they are nickel free or not.

Now should I get paranoid about it and try to find out or just put my head in the sand and hope for the best.

Oh the indecision and more guilt guilt guilt!!!!!!!!!!!! :wacko:

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We have been using our stainless steel copper bottomed cookware for many years.

 

When we had the tests for metals none of us showed any elevations other than mercury

 

that is reassurance enough for me that our cookware isnt leaching anything at us :wacko:

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:D no offense here ;)

 

I really value Dr Mercola as I have learned SO much from him...but I also sometimes have to make my own decisions on some of this stuff......eg he insists that only fish oil is THE EFA to use, but my son tics like crazy if he goes near it! So we use the flax, borage , evening primrose instead.

 

I would think the info re the steel mixes that contain aluminum or nickel is certainly worth noting and so one should check to see what the stainless steel in the cookware contains, and then do the checks and balances.

 

gotta cook in something eh! :wacko:

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That's what I was trying to figure out. What does he suggest we cook in??????

 

Actually, this is a serious question. I wonder what the alternatives are? Andy's grandmothers iron skillet? Are you supposed to stop any iron supplements then?

 

I wouldn't go out and buy new pans if I had stainless steel, but I haven't bought anything yet.

 

Claire

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ahh, finally:

 

4. Avoid cooking in aluminum cookware and any cookware that is coated with a non-stick finish that is cracked. Stainless steel is the better, and **ceramic or porcelain is the best.**

http://www.mercola.com/1998/archive/alumin..._prevention.htm

 

 

Do they even make ceramic or porcelain for stovetop cooking (vs baking)? Anyone know?

 

Claire

 

ps I am high in multiple metals, so I really need to be careful. I have no idea how it happened.

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hi efgh

 

yes, aluminum foil (and plastic wrap) is not recommended

 

 

Claire

one can still get ceramic coated cookware. Problem I found was that it was usually aluminum coated with ceramic and it tends to scratch and chip easily, so I was concerned about the aluminum getting thru

 

I use glass for all my ovenware, and have also got a couple of those Vision glass saucepans.

I actually do very little stovetop cooking as my family likes roasted veggies and most of what we eat is oven stuff, so most of our cooking is done in glassware.

 

On those rare occasions when I fry, or for pasta etc, I use the stainless steel pots.

I make sauces in the glass ones as they are very easy to clean.

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I tried the enamal (ceramic) cookware when I had some, but I threw it out after I burned everything in it. Then I got the aluminium! by inheritence.

Maybe I should have stuck to charcoal!

 

I do get the mercola newsletter, but I've found that he is becoming very commercial in his adverts.

I have seen conflicting info from one week to another,so I do take a lot of it with a grain of salt. :)

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