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Sesame oil and tics?


Guest Guest_efgh
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Guest Guest_efgh

Hi all

 

Just want to know is there is any correlation between sesame oil and tics? I know it varies from one child to other but in general am interested to have your feedback on this.

 

One of the posts mentioned (forgot which one and by whom) that they are trying to avoid bananas for tics as per failsafe.. any idea why? I always thought bananas are not high in salicylates.

 

your feedback on 1) sesame oil 2) bananas

 

thanks.

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efgh,

 

Normal bananas are moderate in amines- no salicylates.

Sugar bananas(lady fingers) are high in Salicylates and amines

 

Sesame seeds are High in salicylates and amines

 

If people are avoiding these foods, it is probably because they are sensitive to them, and could contribute to exacerbation of tics.

 

I don't think that any of us have tried both the Feingold and the failsafe diets to compare them.

 

I know Jeff has had a lot of experience with Feingold and Marina from Aus has been doing Failsafe for about 10 yrs.

 

Perhaps you could do a comparison and start a new thread.

 

Hope this helps

Ausclare.

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I don't think Feingold does amines, but other than that, it 'sounds' (not sure) virtually identical to Failsafe-- both say no artif. ingredients and salicylates. And both claim help for ADHD. Now Feingold recently mentioned tic syndromes also. Feingold is very close to Great Plains, and once raised yeast with me in an email exchange. I never use the Feingold list. Due to our wheat/milk/egg restriction--my son would be malnourished with their list. So we shop at Whole Foods and read labels heavily.

 

My son tested IgG sensitive to bananas and sesame. We had introduced the bananas weekly, but with all this talk, I stopped buying them again. He is so used to not having them he doesn't notice. I never knew sesame was on the list too.

 

It is odd how many things he tested sensitive to that are on the amine/salicylate list. However, he didn't seem to be sensitive to all of them.

 

Many of his sensitivities turn out to be on the salicylate/amine list, which is very interesting to me after reading what Ausclare/Caz and Marina say about Failsafe:

bananas, cranberries, apples, almonds, sesame, corn

 

and of course wheat/quinoa/rye, peanuts, and milk/eggs (and casein, meaning no cheese).

 

We now rotate in just the corn, almonds He does get some apple occasionally in jam, but we never added in apples. Life is so much easier with the almonds (protein source) and corn (flavor and texture like wheat). He rarely gets much tomato anyway. I have noticed that I am not encouraging foods in the salicylate group after reading all the forum comments. Except I encourage berries occasionally due to the antioxidants. He needs this for his high mercury. I have never noticed a reaction to strawberries. So I just don't think that all salicylates/amines bother him.

 

I wish we had more evidence on how well IgG picks up the amines/salicylates that kids are sensitive too. I agree that trial and error is best

 

Is Failsafe particularly big in Australia?

 

Claire

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Hi, the cookbook states canola, safflower, sunflower and soy oils are failsafe (olive oils and all other oils are high in Sals)

Cold pressed or expeller pressed oils are not failsafe too many sals ( except cold pressed soy).

 

So I would assume that sesame oil is high in Sals.

 

 

Failsafe is beginning to be more known.

It was originally developed for ADHD kids, but Sue Dengate the author found the side effects! helped relieve all sorts of problems eg Asthma, excema, reflux, glue ear, migraines. I don't even think Sue knows about the Tic sucesses, I haven't actually contacted her about it.

 

The main thing is she has credibility because one of the major Sydney hospitals works with her. Some of our high rating current affairs programs have run stories on her success with the elimination of the mould inhibiters in our cheap supermarket breads.

 

Of course they still put the stuff in the bread, but I'm pretty sure that in the next couple of years and the reserch (proof) that she is gathering they may stop.

 

 

I could go on (my personal soapbox!!!!!!!!!!!!) but I'll stop there!

 

LOL

Clare :wub:

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