Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

Streptococcal Angina/Psoriasis Vulgaris


Recommended Posts

Deby,

 

Perhaps a series of events happened that finally cause your son's system to cave.

 

Our son was exposed to a child with RF, got sick but seemed to recover on his own.... 6 months later, he got sick again and his first TIC of a cough started, this went on for an entire year...... sick again in June 2009 and 3 weeks later we had full blown PANDAs.

 

You can read up on Sydenham's Chorea that also has a delayed response.

 

-Wendy

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing this.

I had psoriasis for 20 years, since it was always very mild it never really bother me.

My question is , if this is the root of the problem, why it happened to my son at the age of 8 and not before?

I'm going to an immunologist (he is the head of UCLA med center) on Monday, I'll discuss this issue with him.

 

It could be, he had some stress at school (state tests) and we put some pressure on him.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for sharing this.

I had psoriasis for 20 years, since it was always very mild it never really bother me.

My question is , if this is the root of the problem, why it happened to my son at the age of 8 and not before?

I'm going to an immunologist (he is the head of UCLA med center) on Monday, I'll discuss this issue with him.

Deby/All,

 

Deby since you have an appt on Monday, I thought you might want to read some things that I've been looking at. I have had mild psoriasis for 20+ years too. About 1 1/2 years ago, I got an infection on the elbow that had psoriasis. I didn't get on an antibiotic for a couple of days after the weepy infection started. Over night, this became a full blown head to toe body rash. About a week (?) after the rash started, my head broke out in what looked like a horrific case of dandruff. I have never had dandruff in my life. I found a psoriasis web site and started reading. Lo and behold, I learned of the strep connection (altho as usual there is mixed evidence..let me know if you want to read some of my saved info) and others with the body rashes and the scalp reaction. One particular Dr. from UCLA School of Medicine has some research that really caught my attention. Here is one excerpt from her work

 

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal...=1&SRETRY=0

 

Elevated phosphorylase kinase activity in psoriatic epidermis: correlation with increased phosphorylation and psoriatic activity

 

Summary To determine whether abnormal activity of a calmodulin-containing enzyme which catalyses phosphorylation reactions may play a pathogenetic role in psoriasis, the presence and activity of phosphorylase kinase (PK) in human epidermis were determined in patients with untreated/active psoriasis (n=10), treated/resolving psoriasis (n= 10), and non-psoriatic controls (n= 10). Biopsies were taken from involved and uninvolved skin for PK, organic phosphorus, and inorganic phosphate estimation, and light and electron microscopy. The enzyme was present in involved and uninvolved skin of every patient in the study.

 

 

I found another paper that talked about calmodulin being elevated (grossly) in the skin of people with psoriasis.

 

http://www.springerlink.com/content/x6380hv01745h5j7/

 

Calmodulin antagonism inhibits human keratinocyte proliferation

 

calmodulin levels are grossly elevated in both lesional and nonlesional epidermis of psoriasis

 

 

The other thing that really seems to stand out in regards to the scalp outbreak, it seems in people with psoriasis that antibodies to this YEASTare recognizing N acetylglucosamine, the same component of the strep wall that has been found to be recognized in PANDAS.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P...ei0105-0079.pdf

 

Antibodies from patients with Psoriasis recognize N acetylglucosamine terminals in glycoproteins from pityrosporum ovale

 

Something else that has been pretty interesting, the psoriasis on my elbow (probably about 4 inches from elbow down toward wrist..so no small spot) is totally gone for the first time in all those years. It resolved with the other symptoms after the outbreak. I know that there was an attack on other connective tissue subsequent to that whole ordeal tho. I had some mild pitting on my fingernails and some arthritis type symptoms in other areas that I never had before. Also, some weird little bumps, mostly on my hands, and what looks like Keratosis pilaris on my legs at times. One of the worst periods where I noticed these symptoms was right around the time the boys were sick this past winter, and my oldest son started with some fairly bad gut issues. He was diagnosed with mild gastropherisis, and scope showed evidence of reflux. I know there's more but this is the 2nd time I'm trying to post this. The first one disappeared iinto thin air and I gotta run, but will post whatever else I think of later!

Edited by kim
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't seem to find a good picture of it, but does weeping, strep-related psoriasis look like yellow crusty blisters? My DS had that about the time of an outbreak

 

Trying to identify what they might have been.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing this.

I had psoriasis for 20 years, since it was always very mild it never really bother me.

My question is , if this is the root of the problem, why it happened to my son at the age of 8 and not before?

I'm going to an immunologist (he is the head of UCLA med center) on Monday, I'll discuss this issue with him.

Deby/All,

 

Deby since you have an appt on Monday, I thought you might want to read some things that I've been looking at. I have had mild psoriasis for 20+ years too. About 1 1/2 years ago, I got an infection on the elbow that had psoriasis. I didn't get on an antibiotic for a couple of days after the weepy infection started. Over night, this became a full blown head to toe body rash. About a week (?) after the rash started, my head broke out in what looked like a horrific case of dandruff. I have never had dandruff in my life. I found a psoriasis web site and started reading. Lo and behold, I learned of the strep connection (altho as usual there is mixed evidence..let me know if you want to read some of my saved info) and others with the body rashes and the scalp reaction. One particular Dr. from UCLA School of Medicine has some research that really caught my attention. Here is one excerpt from her work

 

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal...=1&SRETRY=0

 

Elevated phosphorylase kinase activity in psoriatic epidermis: correlation with increased phosphorylation and psoriatic activity

 

Summary To determine whether abnormal activity of a calmodulin-containing enzyme which catalyses phosphorylation reactions may play a pathogenetic role in psoriasis, the presence and activity of phosphorylase kinase (PK) in human epidermis were determined in patients with untreated/active psoriasis (n=10), treated/resolving psoriasis (n= 10), and non-psoriatic controls (n= 10). Biopsies were taken from involved and uninvolved skin for PK, organic phosphorus, and inorganic phosphate estimation, and light and electron microscopy. The enzyme was present in involved and uninvolved skin of every patient in the study.
I found another paper that talked about calmodulin being elevated (grossly) in the skin of people with psoriasis.

 

http://www.springerlink.com/content/x6380hv01745h5j7/

 

Calmodulin antagonism inhibits human keratinocyte proliferation

 

calmodulin levels are grossly elevated in both lesional and nonlesional epidermis of psoriasis

 

 

The other thing that really seems to stand out in regards to the scalp outbreak, it seems in people with psoriasis that antibodies to this YEASTare recognizing N acetylglucosamine, the same component of the strep wall that has been found to be recognized in PANDAS.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P...ei0105-0079.pdf

 

Antibodies from patients with Psoriasis recognize N acetylglucosamine terminals in glycoproteins from pityrosporum ovale

 

Something else that has been pretty interesting, the psoriasis on my elbow (probably about 4 inches from elbow down toward wrist..so no small spot) is totally gone for the first time in all those years. It resolved with the other symptoms after the outbreak. I know that there was an attack on other connective tissue subsequent to that whole ordeal tho. I had some mild pitting on my fingernails and some arthritis type symptoms in other areas that I never had before. Also, some weird little bumps, mostly on my hands, and what looks like Keratosis pilaris on my legs at times. One of the worst periods where I noticed these symptoms was right around the time the boys were sick this past winter, and my oldest son started with some fairly bad gut issues. He was diagnosed with mild gastropherisis, and scope showed evidence of reflux. I know there's more but this is the 2nd time I'm trying to post this. The first one disappeared iinto thin air and I gotta run, but will post whatever else I think of later!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ifran,

 

I guess I would say no. It was just a clear watery discharge. Does your son have psoriasis or other dermatitis? Were the blisters on his face or elsewhere?

 

Deby,

 

Don't worry about not understanding! I wrestle with this stuff all of the time and still don't understand a lot either.

 

As you can see below, antibodies are thought to activate calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase in PANDAS so I'm wondering how abnormal activity of a "calmodulin-containing enzyme," factors in to both conditions?

 

 

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P...18/?tool=pubmed

 

Recent evidence suggests that specific antibodies targeted to the dominant epitope of GABHS (N-acetyl-beta-D-Glucosamine) might influence neuronal signal transduction thus causing alterations in behavior and movement control. Accordingly, sera from some patients with Sydenham's chorea [20] or PANDAS [21] contain antibodies that induce calcium-calmodulin dependent protein (CaM) kinase II activity.

 

From link above (Heng)

 

We conclude that PK, a calmodulin-containing enzyme, is involved in regulating calcium-dependent phosphorylation events in human epidermis, and disturbance of its activity may play a key role in the clinical manifestations of psoriasis.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. They were on his lip -- it was about a year ago and cleared up after few days.

 

I was just wondering.

 

-- lfran

Ifran,

 

I guess I would say no. It was just a clear watery discharge. Does your son have psoriasis or other dermatitis? Were the blisters on his face or elsewhere?

 

Deby,

 

Don't worry about not understanding! I wrestle with this stuff all of the time and still don't understand a lot either.

 

As you can see below, antibodies are thought to activate calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase in PANDAS so I'm wondering how abnormal activity of a "calmodulin-containing enzyme," factors in to both conditions?

 

 

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P...18/?tool=pubmed

 

Recent evidence suggests that specific antibodies targeted to the dominant epitope of GABHS (N-acetyl-beta-D-Glucosamine) might influence neuronal signal transduction thus causing alterations in behavior and movement control. Accordingly, sera from some patients with Sydenham's chorea [20] or PANDAS [21] contain antibodies that induce calcium-calmodulin dependent protein (CaM) kinase II activity.

 

From link above (Heng)

 

We conclude that PK, a calmodulin-containing enzyme, is involved in regulating calcium-dependent phosphorylation events in human epidermis, and disturbance of its activity may play a key role in the clinical manifestations of psoriasis.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...