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Everything you ever wanted to know about Mycoplasma


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This is very detailed, but might be of interest to some

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P...pdf/0068-03.pdf

 

One interesting thing that this article states is that mycoplasma outbreaks peak every 5-7 years. I certainly sense there is a difference from one year to another with respect to PANDAS-like illnesses.

 

I wonder if this has anything to do with it

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This is very detailed, but might be of interest to some

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P...pdf/0068-03.pdf

 

One interesting thing that this article states is that mycoplasma outbreaks peak every 5-7 years. I certainly sense there is a difference from one year to another with respect to PANDAS-like illnesses.

 

I wonder if this has anything to do with it

 

This is a great article - very thorough and really helps to explain what these little guys are! I can certainly see many reasons why these may be related to my son's problems with GI disruption, breathing problems, and joint pain... very interesting. Thanks. It's a keeper.

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I just plowed through this very long, yet fascinating, report. Two questions:

1. Where are we in the 5-7 year cycle?

2. What are the top 3 recommended treatments?

 

Thanks, Dr. T for this posting. It really is helpful in understanding what's going on in our dd16.

 

A

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is it possible to dissect this a little

 

on page 702 it says

 

(420). Consistent with the small genome, M. pneumoniae lacks

some enzymes that are associated with virulence of other bacteria,

such as superoxide dismutase and catalase. Hydrogen

peroxide production in M. pneumoniae occurs as a result of a

flavin-terminated electron transport chain (420). Hydrogen

peroxide has been known to be important as a virulence factor

in M. pneumoniae since Somerson et al. showed it to be the

molecule that confers hemolytic activity (385). The ultrastructural

effects of peroxide on host cells such as erythrocytes

include loss of reduced glutathione, denaturation of hemoglobin,

peroxidation of erythrocyte lipids, and eventually lysis of

the cells. Almagor et al. (8) suggested that superoxide anion

produced by M. pneumoniae acts to inhibit catalase in host

cells, thereby reducing the enzymatic breakdown of peroxides

produced endogenously and by the mycoplasma, rendering the

host cell more susceptible to oxidative damage. M. pneumoniae

hemadsorption and lysis of guinea pig erythrocytes, which are

low in endogenous catalase, are also mediated by peroxide

(420). This property was adapted for use as a diagnostic test to

presumptively distinguish M. pneumoniae from other commensal

mycoplasmas that are commonly found in the human respiratory

tract, which do not produce hydrogen peroxide and

therefore do not hemadsorb in this manner.

Host cell lactoferrin acquisition by M. pneumoniae is

yet another possible means by which local injury may occur,

through generation of highly reactive hydroxy radicals resulting

from the introduction of iron complexes in a microenvironment

rendered locally acidic by cellular metabolism that

also includes hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion (419).

 

i've thought about food grade hydrogen peroxide...to add oxygen to the body.....

would that only feed it?

also is it saying iron is bad and should not be taken

 

my concern is that my sons onset was a year ago, so i didn't catch it quick

on page 701 it says.

Rottem (355) has summarized current knowledge

concerning the features that enable M. penetrans, a mycoplasma

of uncertain pathological significance that has been

isolated from urine specimens from human immunodeficiency

virus-infected persons, and M. fermentans to invade host cells,

some of which may be relevant to enhance understanding of

similar events that may occur with M. pneumoniae. Dallo and

Baseman (87) recently described the ability of M. pneumoniae

to survive, synthesize DNA, and undergo cell replication in

artificial cell culture systems over a 6-month period.

 

dose that mean it changed his dna or that it could survive in artifical dna for up to 6 months?

and what would be artifical dna???

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is it possible to dissect this a little

 

on page 702 it says

 

(420). Consistent with the small genome, M. pneumoniae lacks

some enzymes that are associated with virulence of other bacteria,

such as superoxide dismutase and catalase. Hydrogen

peroxide production in M. pneumoniae occurs as a result of a

flavin-terminated electron transport chain (420). Hydrogen

peroxide has been known to be important as a virulence factor

in M. pneumoniae since Somerson et al. showed it to be the

molecule that confers hemolytic activity (385). The ultrastructural

effects of peroxide on host cells such as erythrocytes

include loss of reduced glutathione, denaturation of hemoglobin,

peroxidation of erythrocyte lipids, and eventually lysis of

the cells. Almagor et al. (8) suggested that superoxide anion

produced by M. pneumoniae acts to inhibit catalase in host

cells, thereby reducing the enzymatic breakdown of peroxides

produced endogenously and by the mycoplasma, rendering the

host cell more susceptible to oxidative damage. M. pneumoniae

hemadsorption and lysis of guinea pig erythrocytes, which are

low in endogenous catalase, are also mediated by peroxide

(420). This property was adapted for use as a diagnostic test to

presumptively distinguish M. pneumoniae from other commensal

mycoplasmas that are commonly found in the human respiratory

tract, which do not produce hydrogen peroxide and

therefore do not hemadsorb in this manner.

Host cell lactoferrin acquisition by M. pneumoniae is

yet another possible means by which local injury may occur,

through generation of highly reactive hydroxy radicals resulting

from the introduction of iron complexes in a microenvironment

rendered locally acidic by cellular metabolism that

also includes hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion (419).

 

i've thought about food grade hydrogen peroxide...to add oxygen to the body.....

would that only feed it?

also is it saying iron is bad and should not be taken

 

my concern is that my sons onset was a year ago, so i didn't catch it quick

on page 701 it says.

Rottem (355) has summarized current knowledge

concerning the features that enable M. penetrans, a mycoplasma

of uncertain pathological significance that has been

isolated from urine specimens from human immunodeficiency

virus-infected persons, and M. fermentans to invade host cells,

some of which may be relevant to enhance understanding of

similar events that may occur with M. pneumoniae. Dallo and

Baseman (87) recently described the ability of M. pneumoniae

to survive, synthesize DNA, and undergo cell replication in

artificial cell culture systems over a 6-month period.

 

dose that mean it changed his dna or that it could survive in artifical dna for up to 6 months?

and what would be artifical dna???

 

I said I wouldn't post but I felt I had to for sake of safety

 

NEVER GIVE YOUR CHILD HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

 

NEVER NEVER

 

This is not the way to treat mycoplasma!

 

email me Fixit ...

 

D r. T

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Host cell lactoferrin acquisition by M. pneumoniae is

yet another possible means by which local injury may occur,

through generation of highly reactive hydroxy radicals resulting

from the introduction of iron complexes in a microenvironment

rendered locally acidic by cellular metabolism that

also includes hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion (419).

 

 

Good Lord! Our local ped had our son start iron therapy in mid-Dec due to low ferritin. Things really hit the fan a few weeks after this started and I reduced the iron after about a month - learning that it interfered with the absorption of Omnicef. The daily rages slowed down shortly after which I attributed to the absorption of the abx. Now I wonder...He is now OFF the iron supp (his levels weren't that low to start - no anemia, and our ped never wanted to bother to find out WHY his levels were low...)

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Host cell lactoferrin acquisition by M. pneumoniae is

yet another possible means by which local injury may occur,

through generation of highly reactive hydroxy radicals resulting

from the introduction of iron complexes in a microenvironment

rendered locally acidic by cellular metabolism that

also includes hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion (419).

 

 

Good Lord! Our local ped had our son start iron therapy in mid-Dec due to low ferritin. Things really hit the fan a few weeks after this started and I reduced the iron after about a month - learning that it interfered with the absorption of Omnicef. The daily rages slowed down shortly after which I attributed to the absorption of the abx. Now I wonder...He is now OFF the iron supp (his levels weren't that low to start - no anemia, and our ped never wanted to bother to find out WHY his levels were low...)

 

 

Very important observation!

 

Many kids with PITANDS have unexplained low ferritin levels!

 

Low ferritin levels usually serve as a red flag to doctors for iron deficiency. In that case --- iron deficiency >> low ferritin levels.

 

But, these kids are not iron deficient! - there are many markers of iron deficiency - low MCV, low hematocrit, high total iron binding capacity ... these kids are not iron deficient

 

 

I have another idea -- what if the low ferritin is not a consequence of iron deficiency, but the primary problem? In that case

 

low ferritin >> relative iron overload --- i.e. iron toxicity

 

Where does iron toxicity manifest in the brain ---- surprise, surprise - the basal ganglia

 

So giving iron here may be the wrong thing to do - patients may get worse!

 

 

 

Another clue

 

Low ferritin levels, whatever the cause, are invariably related to RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME. The incidence of RLS, the most common movement disorder in adults (and maybe children too) is much higher in children with tics/Tourette's

 

Read about restless legs syndrome here

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restless_legs_syndrome

 

 

Does this fit at all with your child ....

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Host cell lactoferrin acquisition by M. pneumoniae is

yet another possible means by which local injury may occur,

through generation of highly reactive hydroxy radicals resulting

from the introduction of iron complexes in a microenvironment

rendered locally acidic by cellular metabolism that

also includes hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion (419).

 

 

Good Lord! Our local ped had our son start iron therapy in mid-Dec due to low ferritin. Things really hit the fan a few weeks after this started and I reduced the iron after about a month - learning that it interfered with the absorption of Omnicef. The daily rages slowed down shortly after which I attributed to the absorption of the abx. Now I wonder...He is now OFF the iron supp (his levels weren't that low to start - no anemia, and our ped never wanted to bother to find out WHY his levels were low...)

 

 

Very important observation!

 

Many kids with PITANDS have unexplained low ferritin levels!

 

Low ferritin levels usually serve as a red flag to doctors for iron deficiency. In that case --- iron deficiency >> low ferritin levels.

 

But, these kids are not iron deficient! - there are many markers of iron deficiency - low MCV, low hematocrit, high total iron binding capacity ... these kids are not iron deficient

 

 

I have another idea -- what if the low ferritin is not a consequence of iron deficiency, but the primary problem? In that case

 

low ferritin >> relative iron overload --- i.e. iron toxicity

 

Where does iron toxicity manifest in the brain ---- surprise, surprise - the basal ganglia

 

So giving iron here may be the wrong thing to do - patients may get worse!

 

 

 

Another clue

 

Low ferritin levels, whatever the cause, are invariably related to RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME. The incidence of RLS, the most common movement disorder in adults (and maybe children too) is much higher in children with tics/Tourette's

 

Read about restless legs syndrome here

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restless_legs_syndrome

 

 

Does this fit at all with your child ....

 

Wow! This is every bit the puzzle that autism represents. Dr. T, I hope you know everyday how appreciated you are by parents like me!

 

Gat's mom

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I just emailed Dr T...i hope i'm not in trouble :P

 

i was just asking as it seemed so specifice and an odd element

i take everythng i give my kids past a professional be a administering

 

and that was why i posted about the iron too!!

 

now i'm questioning amino acids which dont seem to sit well with my son///

 

trying to plug through that paper a couple of pages a night..

 

and i always!!! welcome dr t's advice...but if it is a conflict on any level for him to be here i get it!!!!

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Regarding hydrogen peroxide, I have heard some places talk about supplementing with oxygenated water as better for a person than hydrogen peroxide. There are definitely mixed reviews of the hydrogen peroxide in the health community. I do take the oxygenated water as well as breathe air a couple hours a day through an oxygen concentrator. Building oxygen can definitely help. We are oxygen starved here, compared to back before the industrial revolution.

 

Michael

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