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Boy do I wish I had this information four years ago...and eight years ago when the whole nightmare got underway.

 

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

 

Muller N, Riedel M, Blendinger C, Oberle K, Jacobs E, Abele-Horn M.

Hospital for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munchen, Nussbaumstrasse 7, D-80336 Munchen, Germany. nmueller@psy.med.uni-muenchen.de

 

An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS.

 

PMID: 15590039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

1: Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Aug;31(2):119-21. Links

Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.Matsuo M, Tsuchiya K, Hamasaki Y, Singer HS.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

 

Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen.

 

PMID: 15301831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Boy do I wish I had this information four years ago...and eight years ago when the whole nightmare got underway.

 

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

 

Muller N, Riedel M, Blendinger C, Oberle K, Jacobs E, Abele-Horn M.

Hospital for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munchen, Nussbaumstrasse 7, D-80336 Munchen, Germany. nmueller@psy.med.uni-muenchen.de

 

An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS.

 

PMID: 15590039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

1: Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Aug;31(2):119-21. Links

Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.Matsuo M, Tsuchiya K, Hamasaki Y, Singer HS.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

 

Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen.

 

PMID: 15301831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17 v 1! Really!? I'd call that a little more than "significant".

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Boy do I wish I had this information four years ago...and eight years ago when the whole nightmare got underway.

 

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

 

Muller N, Riedel M, Blendinger C, Oberle K, Jacobs E, Abele-Horn M.

Hospital for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munchen, Nussbaumstrasse 7, D-80336 Munchen, Germany. nmueller@psy.med.uni-muenchen.de

 

An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS.

 

PMID: 15590039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

1: Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Aug;31(2):119-21. Links

Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.Matsuo M, Tsuchiya K, Hamasaki Y, Singer HS.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

 

Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen.

 

PMID: 15301831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17 v 1! Really!? I'd call that a little more than "significant".

 

That is extremely interesting and the article mentions other infections like Borrelia Burgdorferi, which is the real name for Lyme Disease. I have read that 60 percent of lyme patients are "co-infected" with Mycoplasma P. The problem is the tests for Lyme are so unreliable that you could have it and not know it. I am pretty sure that the drugs used to treat lyme, treat Mycoplasma, but not sure if it works the other way around. Having multiple infections apparently makes it hard to get rid of lyme and the same is probably true with respect to strept, as you mentioned.

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Boy do I wish I had this information four years ago...and eight years ago when the whole nightmare got underway.

 

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

 

Muller N, Riedel M, Blendinger C, Oberle K, Jacobs E, Abele-Horn M.

Hospital for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munchen, Nussbaumstrasse 7, D-80336 Munchen, Germany. nmueller@psy.med.uni-muenchen.de

 

An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS.

 

PMID: 15590039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

1: Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Aug;31(2):119-21. Links

Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.Matsuo M, Tsuchiya K, Hamasaki Y, Singer HS.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

 

Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen.

 

PMID: 15301831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17 v 1! Really!? I'd call that a little more than "significant".

 

That is extremely interesting and the article mentions other infections like Borrelia Burgdorferi, which is the real name for Lyme Disease. I have read that 60 percent of lyme patients are "co-infected" with Mycoplasma P. The problem is the tests for Lyme are so unreliable that you could have it and not know it. I am pretty sure that the drugs used to treat lyme, treat Mycoplasma, but not sure if it works the other way around. Having multiple infections apparently makes it hard to get rid of lyme and the same is probably true with respect to strept, as you mentioned.

 

When my son's recent labs came back and he was negative for Lyme, I wondered how accurate that might be. I've read your posts about how to go about testing for Lyme through different labs. I pray to not have dig for more co-infections after treating mycoplasma.

 

I spent the entire day looking for literature on possible healing regressions (herx reactions) in asymptomatic patients when starting antibiotics to treat for mycoplasma. Not an easy task. He had a bad cough (most dry) shortly after waking up. It was not there yesterday. It triggered every vomit fear in him and was the catalyst to a huge meltdown and a day not nearly as beautiful as yesterday's. Now he's balking at taking the biaxin. I can't take much more.

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Boy do I wish I had this information four years ago...and eight years ago when the whole nightmare got underway.

 

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

 

Muller N, Riedel M, Blendinger C, Oberle K, Jacobs E, Abele-Horn M.

Hospital for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munchen, Nussbaumstrasse 7, D-80336 Munchen, Germany. nmueller@psy.med.uni-muenchen.de

 

An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS.

 

PMID: 15590039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

1: Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Aug;31(2):119-21. Links

Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.Matsuo M, Tsuchiya K, Hamasaki Y, Singer HS.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

 

Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen.

 

PMID: 15301831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

17 v 1! Really!? I'd call that a little more than "significant".

 

That is extremely interesting and the article mentions other infections like Borrelia Burgdorferi, which is the real name for Lyme Disease. I have read that 60 percent of lyme patients are "co-infected" with Mycoplasma P. The problem is the tests for Lyme are so unreliable that you could have it and not know it. I am pretty sure that the drugs used to treat lyme, treat Mycoplasma, but not sure if it works the other way around. Having multiple infections apparently makes it hard to get rid of lyme and the same is probably true with respect to strept, as you mentioned.

 

When my son's recent labs came back and he was negative for Lyme, I wondered how accurate that might be. I've read your posts about how to go about testing for Lyme through different labs. I pray to not have dig for more co-infections after treating mycoplasma.

 

I spent the entire day looking for literature on possible healing regressions (herx reactions) in asymptomatic patients when starting antibiotics to treat for mycoplasma. Not an easy task. He had a bad cough (most dry) shortly after waking up. It was not there yesterday. It triggered every vomit fear in him and was the catalyst to a huge meltdown and a day not nearly as beautiful as yesterday's. Now he's balking at taking the biaxin. I can't take much more.

I'm so sorry that you and your son have to go through this. It is awful. I know how hard it is to get a child to take the medicine. I did a little research and found an article on the Canlyme website that says that biaxin and azithromycin can be used to treat lyme. That is good b/c then you don't need to worry about whether the lyme test was falsely negative. It might be worth retesting him after a month of antibiotics b/c it can turn a test positive by giving your immune system a chance to fight back. I also found this interesting article about the Mycoplasmas written by Drs Garth and Nancy Nicolson.

http://www.rense.com/general7/microplasm.htm. Apparently their daughter returned from the Gulf very sick and got them sick. Being research doctors they attacked the problem and discovered that they were infected with a form of mycoplasma called mycoplasma fermentans. They later linked this infection to the spouses and children of gulf war vets. This is a different type of mycoplasma but they discuss all the mycoplasmas as if they have some of the same properties. They say that the treatment can be difficult (which may mean herxes) and it is long like the treatment for lyme disease. The gist of the article is that these mystery illnesses are not caused by just one micro-organism but multiple complex infections. Good luck and hang in there! If he is herxing the good news is that he is killing something and he will get better!

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Michael (from Tampa) said he had a cough too I think shortly after starting meds for mycroplasma. Do you think the meds are making the bacteria come more to the "surface" and making some symptoms appear? Weird.

 

Lyme mom and Vickie: Thanks so much ladies. It's been a day here. I did read that article about the Gulf War Illness a couple days ago..very interesting stuff. I didn't know that Azith and Biaxin were good choices for Lyme so I do feel better about that. I'll be pushing for a repeat of almost all bloodwork in a month or so which I'm hoping will support on paper the recovery in my son (how's that for sounding hopeful?) Michael did mention to me his cough around day 7...thank Heaven he did too or I would have lost my mind today. I do believe that a herx shows a step in the right direction. I couldn't guess as to the mechanism behind a cough in an asymptomatic myco p kid except to say that the antibiotic is getting to the infection and the cough is the body's way of trying to rid itself of it. I haven't heard from Michael as to the duration of his cough and I just can't find enough among our peers to see what I can expect for my lad. I will say this, his cough started within an hour of him being awake. The meltdown was after an hour of so of coughing. Several hours later, it was gone. He says if he takes a very deep breath he feels like coughing but he hasn't made a noise since early afternoon. We've discussed logically the cough, that it doesn't mean in an way vomiting and I showed him the labs and all the data showing this medication for that infection to try and instill some faith. He's just been through so much and is old enough to know how many dead ends we've been down. He's an otherwise strong, healthy 16 yr old. Maybe the cough was the effect of sleeping still all night and we'll only have it a time or so before the abx kill it all off and he can have some relief. Again, it is so good to have support. Thank you, thank you!

Gayle

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I feel for him with that cough and fear of throwing up. It's like one of those when you feel like you can't take a deep enough breath. After awhile his abdomen might hurt from the forceful movement too.

 

Now don't do this w/o talking to a dr, but do you think cough medicine would help? I am usually anti-cough med, but with Mycro P, people cough because (oh, can't think of the technical term), something paralyzes and can't move, that causes the cough. Again, I'm usually anti cough meds, but if his fear of throwing up is increasing, talk to his doctor about the possibility. Who's his dr? Dr T. Please just talk to his doctor first before giving anything.

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I feel for him with that cough and fear of throwing up. It's like one of those when you feel like you can't take a deep enough breath. After awhile his abdomen might hurt from the forceful movement too.

 

Now don't do this w/o talking to a dr, but do you think cough medicine would help? I am usually anti-cough med, but with Mycro P, people cough because (oh, can't think of the technical term), something paralyzes and can't move, that causes the cough. Again, I'm usually anti cough meds, but if his fear of throwing up is increasing, talk to his doctor about the possibility. Who's his dr? Dr T. Please just talk to his doctor first before giving anything.

 

Vickie, I was thinking just like you. Last night I had my Gat's dad go out and get my cough medicine (one without a drowsy quality & one with as well as a selection of cough drops). I had decided I would either wait to hear from Dr. T and his suggestion and try not to use either until then (unless things got crazy). Like you, I believe fully that a cough is the body's way of casting off a toxin of some kind (like a sneeze) but I had to be ready to weigh out the collateral damage, emotionally, of being taken to a high level of anxiety. Thankfully, it never came down to that decision. He did take his second dose for me last night with little grumbling. No coughing even as he tried to go to sleep. He also fell asleep within 30 minutes of going to bed...the best time in nearly a month. He woke up at 4:45 for a drink and I though there would be coughing (throat clearing and sniffing) as he tried to get himself back to sleep but there was none, though it did take him nearly an hour to get back to sleep. He woke up for good (wide awake) at 10:30. Ok, that's 2 days in a row of less than 12 hrs of sleep. He showered (with the door closed!) and looked for something to eat. Usually it takes hours for him to find something he's willing to eat. My biz partner was a respiratory therapist in her past life & I talked to her about the cough. She said that in many pneumonia patients who were surpised to learn they had it because they had no horrible cough or wheeze, she had to inform them that starting the abx would bring about those symptoms for a few days. Today we're praying that his otherwise strong body is fighting this myco p like a champ and maybe our isolated couple hours of coughing yesterday will be the worst of it. So for now, the cough meds stay unopened.

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So, it's like the abx is drawing out the bacteria and that's why symptoms are surfacing after starting it. So, if you look at it from that perspective, I would think it means the meds are working and now his body can start fighting it!

 

That, or there's the die off concept that when bacteria or fungi are killed in large quantities (at the hands of the abx) there is a load of toxic remains for the body to have to process. I couldn't begin to venture which is going on though I know either would be considered a step in the right direction. As sick as this kid is, I know his body has been given a huge chore in recovering itself. In my heart, I believe fully that the sooner you are on these pathogens the easier the recovery would be. We were 8 hard weeks in which is an improvement over being many months or years in, I guess. I know we all have it but its so hard to stay positive watching your child endure something to cruel with very few cut and dry answers.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Boy do I wish I had this information four years ago...and eight years ago when the whole nightmare got underway.

 

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and Tourette's syndrome.

 

Muller N, Riedel M, Blendinger C, Oberle K, Jacobs E, Abele-Horn M.

Hospital for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munchen, Nussbaumstrasse 7, D-80336 Munchen, Germany. nmueller@psy.med.uni-muenchen.de

 

An association between infection and Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been described repeatedly. A role for streptococcal infection (PANDAS) has been established for several years, but the involvement of other infectious agents such as Borrelia Burgdorferi or Mycoplasma pneumoniae has only been described in single case reports. We examined antibody titers against M. pneumoniae and various types of antibodies by immunoblot in patients and in a sex- and age-matched comparison group. Participants comprised 29 TS patients and 29 controls. Antibody titers against M. pneumoniae were determined by microparticle agglutination (MAG) assay and confirmed by immunoblot. Elevated titers were found in significantly more TS patients than controls (17 vs. 1). Additionally, the number of IgA positive patients was significantly higher in the TS group than in the control group (9 vs. 1). A higher proportion of increased serum titers and especially of IgA antibodies suggests a role for M. pneumoniae in a subgroup of patients with TS and supports the finding of case reports implicating an acute or chronic infection with M. pneumoniae as one etiological agent for tics. An autoimmune reaction, however, has to be taken into account. In predisposed persons, infection with various agents including M. pneumoniae should be considered as at least an aggravating factor in TS.

 

PMID: 15590039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

1: Pediatr Neurol. 2004 Aug;31(2):119-21. Links

Restless legs syndrome: association with streptococcal or mycoplasma infection.Matsuo M, Tsuchiya K, Hamasaki Y, Singer HS.

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

 

Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections have been reported to cause neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as chorea, tics, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, presumably through autoimmune damage to basal ganglia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have also been reported to cause damage to the basal ganglia. Restless legs syndrome is a movement disorder with focal restlessness, an irresistible desire to move, and exacerbation by long periods of sitting or lying. We present three children with transient restless legs syndrome-like symptoms possibly associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. One of three patients had persistently elevated enzyme-linked immunosorbent optical density values against human caudate and putamen.

 

PMID: 15301831 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

Dr T i know you are busy...

but have you seen this thread..

i found the link to the first one

 

http://www.journals.elsevierhealth.com/per...002082/abstract

 

still on hunt for the second one as my sons tics are in his arms and legs

 

But has anyone seen this one....or is it posted already

 

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/conten...journalcode=ajp

 

I don't understand why more people don't know this...or follow through like doc T said as opposted to throwing ssri's at people

It's in the americn journal of psychatry for peets sake or is that considered a rag?

it says they used "treatment with erythromycin was begun (900 mg/day) and continued for 4 weeks" other kid was higher

 

So what are the thoughts on trying this for myco p..as another drug in the arsonal

Didn't someone here have link on something where a pharmacuetaicla that started with D is used for 2 months

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OK i'm an idiot...i just checked dr t's site and that one is already on there.

And now that i have layed my simple mindedness in front of all

 

Just got my son's blood woark back and i'm shaking.....

Waiting for Dr k or t to call me back but i can't wait

Does this mean he has Myco P?

 

Myco P Igg abs U/ml 0-99

 

negative <100

interdetermin 100-320

positive >320

 

His score was 631

 

 

 

Myco P Igm 0-769

 

Neg <770

low pos 770-950

Pos >950

 

his score was <770

 

Does this mean he has it and isn't producing antibodies????????

 

Please you smart people or someone who understands this..........Do i finally have an answer to this as things have seemed worse lately?

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Definate evidence of prior infection. Though if you read above thread about IGM may not elevated for reinfection, just IGG so this could be recent reinfection vs infection fir the first time. The IGM elevates with first time infection and go away over a period of several months.

 

memom

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Definate evidence of prior infection. Though if you read above thread about IGM may not elevated for reinfection, just IGG so this could be recent reinfection vs infection fir the first time. The IGM elevates with first time infection and go away over a period of several months.

 

memom

 

Would the Igm ever elevated again on say a second infection.?

Or if you miss the 1st time you'll never get confirming Igm's again on a second infection?

Just trying to understand, sorry, i need it worded a certain way to get a grip on it...

 

I guees i also need affirmation from the class, that on a scale that only goes to 300ish and ds is at 631 wouldn' t that be confirmation?

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