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I just thought I'd throw out there that during our last exacerbation at age 11, our back yard trampoline became the most effective form of therapy in our arsenal..keeping in mind that I could not get a doc to rx abx, steroids or anything else other than ssri. He's 16 and spending less time on it, though this is the first nice day we've had since he really slid backward. I strongly suspect he'll be out on it later today. But back in the middle school days, in ALL weather conditions, he would go out and jump straight up and down (no flips or the usual acrobatics he's capable of). He'd face away from the house and wear it out for 15 minutes. When he'd come back in he'd be calmer and more focused. When we first met out DAN! doc (our first free thinking doc) I mentioned this to him and he was not surprised to hear it. He summarized to me that when his feet hit the canvas it serves to balance him from a neurological standpoint. Gatlin has lots of outdoor entertainment at his disposal but the trampoline was where he'd head the minute he felt bad.

 

Just thought this might be another tool to add to everyone's toolbox.

 

Gat's mom

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For my 12 yr old son it is the guitar. He taught himself how to play two summers ago on YouTube. He started with his tics/OCD in September '09. After all this time trying to figure out what is going on, the guitar has helped him. I even have him taking classical guitar lessons. He still has a defiant attitude of not wanting to take them but after every lesson he's glad he took it.

 

He's now on CEFDINIR 300 mg twice a day. AMOX-CLAV 875 mg twice a day didn't work out. He was starting to feel rage come on and he told me. This kid is very passive ... someone who's a peace maker. He was able to tell me that this was going on and I called the doctor. He switched him to CEFDINIR. So far so good after 3 days. Keeping my fingers crossed.

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Our daughters was any kind of jumping - and standing on her head. She would be in a rage, do this perfect headstand & hold it for minutes at a time & come up so much calmer. She actually learned to do a headstand one day at the end of a 2 hour fit about touching her dresser drawers. We went from tears and rage to astonishment and giggles in about 60 seconds.

 

She got a lot of practice - you should see what she can do on her head now!

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For my 12 yr old son it is the guitar. He taught himself how to play two summers ago on YouTube. He started with his tics/OCD in September '09. After all this time trying to figure out what is going on, the guitar has helped him. I even have him taking classical guitar lessons. He still has a defiant attitude of not wanting to take them but after every lesson he's glad he took it.

 

He's now on CEFDINIR 300 mg twice a day. AMOX-CLAV 875 mg twice a day didn't work out. He was starting to feel rage come on and he told me. This kid is very passive ... someone who's a peace maker. He was able to tell me that this was going on and I called the doctor. He switched him to CEFDINIR. So far so good after 3 days. Keeping my fingers crossed.

 

I never thought about YouTube for lessons. Mine wants a drum set bad and I know any form of movement helps him. He doesn't want lessons but wants to know how to play. Things are too dicey, emotionally, for me to commit him to lessons of any kind right now BUT if he could find something on YouTube that might get him started. Thanks for the info about your lad and how nice that you have a doc whose responds so quickly. Hope the good holds for both of you.

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I just thought I'd throw out there that during our last exacerbation at age 11, our back yard trampoline became the most effective form of therapy in our arsenal..keeping in mind that I could not get a doc to rx abx, steroids or anything else other than ssri. He's 16 and spending less time on it, though this is the first nice day we've had since he really slid backward. I strongly suspect he'll be out on it later today. But back in the middle school days, in ALL weather conditions, he would go out and jump straight up and down (no flips or the usual acrobatics he's capable of). He'd face away from the house and wear it out for 15 minutes. When he'd come back in he'd be calmer and more focused. When we first met out DAN! doc (our first free thinking doc) I mentioned this to him and he was not surprised to hear it. He summarized to me that when his feet hit the canvas it serves to balance him from a neurological standpoint. Gatlin has lots of outdoor entertainment at his disposal but the trampoline was where he'd head the minute he felt bad.

 

Just thought this might be another tool to add to everyone's toolbox.

 

Gat's mom

 

Well before we knew about any real issues, our son loved jumping off things . . . the stairs, the coffee table. It seemed to provide some relief or stimulus that nothing else could. I read a book back then about "highly sensitive" children in which the author, a psychiatrist, posited that these kids like "percussive" body movements because it serves as an outlet. When they "bang" or "bounce," they release some pent-up sensory stuff, and that is pleasing and calming to them.

 

We got a backyard trampoline when our son turned 7 . . . my thought was we would spare his bed and the ceiling over his bed from the constant bouncing there! It became a godsend in a lot of ways. Jumping helped him release and chill, and just having the trampoline in the backyard opened him up to some social opportunities because we became the neighborhood house "with the trampoline in the back yard!" Kid magnet!

 

We've since gotten one of those small, indoor, jogging trampolines for our harsh winters. (I admit it, I use it too! :) )

 

I think you're on to something there!

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Hi.

 

My PANDAS dd6 had a LOT of sensory processing problems with her episodes and my ds2 (possibly PANDAS) also has some low level sensory issues. I was reading and wondering recently if some of the rages/tantrums that PANDAS kids have are in response to their sensory issues. Kids with Sensory Processing Disorder can flip out at what seems to most people, either nothing or odd things.

 

If this were the case the trampoline and even the headstand thing would be ways for them to regulate again.. just a thought....

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My DS9 and DD7 both have sensory issues. When jordan was diagnosed our OT told us to get a trampoline and if we could fit a small one in the house get one of those too! My daughter went to OT when she was just 4 for sensory issues that the ped thought were related to not being able to expend enough energy and that is why she wasnt sleeping and getting so upset.... her fav activities there involved fast motion jumping and spinning - My sons therapist told us that some kid crave vestibular motion... It is an interesting connection...

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