Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

Day 7 on antibiotic, saw a foot stomp today


myrose
 Share

Recommended Posts

Okay so now day 7 on amoxicillin and for the first time I noticed a small foot stomp today. The only thing different from the last 7 days from today was that the nasonex spray ended yesterday. Today she only had amoxicillin and no nasonex.

I also noticed she started to pick the skin on the sides of her fingers. It was pretty bad. Does this have anything to do with the tics??

I was happy when she was completely tic free but I also felt I knew they would probably come back. Its okay though the last 7 tic free days gave my mind a needed rest! I was so overwhelmed from all the info on these boards that I was about to explode! I am refreshed and ready to stick with our plans. She hasn't mentioned the foot stomp to me at all even though I saw it so I am hoping it will not bother her like it was before. This whole experience has got to be the most draining of my life. (emotionally anyhow)

And then there is the fighter and the determinationer (is that a word) that comes out of me that I never knew exsisted.

Any comments on the skin picking would be helpful even though I am secretly scared to death to ask....just am afraid as to what you all will tell me. But please do...

I am going to just see what happens after Sunday. This is the day the antibiotics are done. If things pick up real bad I will start Bonnies Supplements until we get in to the allergist.

Thank you all for all your support and help.

I am not sure if the ones who reply to my (and many other) posts realize that their words, comments and suggestions have made all the difference in the "tic world". I am embarrassed to admit that the "strength" that is supposed to come from inside...sometimes comes from here for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jasminky,

 

Regarding the finger picking, it COULD be a tic. Its also a common, legitimate habit that some of my adult friends indulge in. I think only time will tell. If it is a tic, I think you will see more and more of it, and it will appear a little less purposeful than a more typical skin picking, nail biting type of habit.

 

I know how scary this is. In the early stages of my son's tic disorder, I hovered and spied constantly. If he did something once, I could imagine him doing it all day long for weeks or months. Needless to say, there were a lot of false alarms. Since most tics are fragments of ordinary behavior, imagine what a basket case I was.

 

If you do proceed with the allergy testing, are you having the IGg?

 

 

Tami

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lurker...what is the ICG you mention? we have so far been through MRI, EEG and then bloodwork. I have not gone down the allergy road yet. Because the nasonex had such a positive effect I told myself it was the best next step to take. (sure I have many more steps after this as well) Anyhow I know nothing of an allergy test and have no idea what they will even do. I only heard of skin scaping?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

My son also picks on his fingers, but I think it's more of a bad habit than a tic. I also pick at my fingers especially when I'm nervous.

My husband used to bite his nails really badly when he was a kid. Sometimes it's hard to tell what's a tic or a bad habit.

I'd like to think this is a bad habit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jasminky

 

This article might be something you want to read thru. I just googled the 4 words... skin picking ocd autism. I almost always attach the word autism to a search because it usually helps turn up more of the type of info that I'm looking for, not because we are dealing with autism.

 

I didn't read the whole thing throughly, but it looks like SSRI's were most effective for that type of problem. You might want to consider tryptopan or 5htp if it gets to be a real problem? As always, have to say that a physicians guidance is always preferrable.

 

Wanted to mention I thought this paragraph was interesting. The marker that they mention (D8/17) is not only associtated with rheumatic fever, I'm almost certain this is overexpressed in some PANDAS patiens as well.

 

http://www.neuropsychiatryreviews.com/oct0..._oct00_ocd.html

 

In addition, Dr. Hollander and colleagues reported last year that the B lymphocyte antigen D8/17—which is associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatic fever and is overexpressed in several disorders in the OCD spectrum—is far more likely to be expressed by the B cells of autistic subjects (78%) than those of medically ill matched controls (21%). Again, autistic persons with the most severe OC symptoms were especially likely to express this marker; this fact suggests that D8/17 is more related to the particular symptom dimension of repetitive behaviors than to autism per se, Dr. Hollander noted. He added that among family members of autistic individuals, those who have this marker have the highest levels of OCD or OC symptoms
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't read the whole thing throughly, but it looks like SSRI's were most effective for that type of problem.

 

ooh!

I think SSRIs are too dangerous!

Diet is much better, more natural, safer.

Our ds had OCD like tendancies in the very beginning when his symptoms were at his worst. That faded and disappeared with diet. Takes time. But works.

FYI 33% of schizophrenics were found to be undiagnosed celiacs in a study by Walsh of the Pfeiffer Center.

 

Gluten lady at it again! Ugh!

Y'all sick of me yet?

 

http://healthy-family.org/caryn/402 (for more info on SSRI dangers) also view the Gary Null video that I link to if you want more info on ADHD drugs as well.

Scary stuff!

Caryn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooh!

I think SSRIs are too dangerous!

Diet is much better, more natural, safer.

Caryn :)

 

I'm really glad that you posted that remark. It kind of gives me the chance to explain that I have gotten in the habit of looking at drugs and studies to see what i can take from them and apply to supplement use or even diet changes. I am not advocating the use of an SSRI. That's why I mentioned tryptophan or 5HTP as they can boost serotonin levels.

 

I don't think anyone is sick of you. Your celiac/gluten expertise are wonderful!

 

 

Jasminky,

 

You might want to get familiar with Nasonex too. Look at this

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucocorticoid

 

Immunosuppressive mechanism

Glucocorticoids suppress the cell-mediated immunity. They act by inhibiting genes that code for the cytokines IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8 and IFN-γ, the most important of which is the IL-2. Smaller cytokine production reduces the T cell proliferation.

 

Glucocorticoids also suppress the humoral immunity, causing B cells to express smaller amounts of IL-2 and of IL-2 receptors. This diminishes both B cell clone expansion and antibody synthesis. The diminished amounts of IL-2 also causes fewer T lymphocyte cells to be activated.

Since glucocorticoid is a steroid, it regulates transcription factors; another factor it down-regulates is the expression of Fc receptors on macrophages, so there is a decreased phagocytosis of opsonised cells.

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mometasone_furoate

 

Schering-Plough markets the medication under the following brand names; Elocon (Elocom) as a cream or ointment for skin conditions, Nasonex as a nasal spray for upper respiratory conditions, Asmanex Twisthaler as a dry powder inhaler (DPI) for lower respiratory conditions.

 

Edit

 

I'm wondering if you look at the quote from the above post, in a PANDAS situation, if the nasonex could be having an effect on the B cells? Could be something to run by a Dr. who understands all of this. I think others have mentioned steroid use for PANDAS symptoms. I think it's a really good thing for you to keep an eye on. If you saw improvements with Nasonex, but not amoxycillan, you may need a different antibiotic?

 

In addition, Dr. Hollander and colleagues reported last year that the B lymphocyte antigen D8/17—which is associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatic fever and is overexpressed in several disorders in the OCD spectrum—is far more likely to be expressed by the B cells of autistic subjects (78%) than those of medically ill matched controls (21%). Again, autistic persons with the most severe OC symptoms were especially likely to express this marker; this fact suggests that D8/17 is more related to the particular symptom dimension of repetitive behaviors than to autism per se, Dr. Hollander noted. He added that among family members of autistic individuals, those who have this marker have the highest levels of OCD or OC symptoms
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jasminky

 

If the tics are mild and not a obstruction in daily activity just let it go and keep a watch on it. I think medication should be only used if required even if antibiotics. Try to use fish oil and vitamins ( multi + extra C ) and other natural food ( vegis and meats ) and ride them out.

cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...