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Westleigh

Oral Stim Seeking and Hyper Verbal

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This is my first message, so please bear with me.

 

My 8 year old son has problems that may stem from a need to seek oral stimulation. He chews on things inappropriately (shirt collars and cuffs, coat zippers, his fingers, his fist, etc.). He also is "hyper verbal," speaks out in class inappropriately, speaks without thinking of the repercussions of his words, and is a near-constant noise maker when not visually engaged (as with a book, tv, game boy, etc.). He sometimes sings his answers when it would be more appropriate to talk. In addition he is argumentative and never knows when to drop a subject and quit arguing or detailing the discussion ad nauseum. Has anyone had any success in reducing or eliminating any of these kinds of behaviors?

 

He was diagnosed with ADHD-type behavior at age 5 (he had many other behaviors at that age, which have improved with various therapies). We tried Concerta and Adderall, but they didn't help with any of the symptoms.

 

He had major aggression issues from age 1 - 6 but they have all but disappeared after a program to remove heavy metals and toxins. But that therapy didn't help the verbal component.

 

He was diagnosed with Sensory Integration Dysfunction at age 7, and Occupational Therapy, combined with a home program, has helped with many other symptoms, but not the verbal problems.

 

We have gone through "The Listening Program" by Advanced Brain Technologies, as well as the "Brain Builder" software, and although they helped with some other symptoms, again, he remains hyper verbal and oral stim seeking.

 

The Feingold diet didn't work for us.

 

I am tempted to try the "Interactive Metronome" therapy, even though it seems to have more to do with motor planning than anything. I'm just assuming it might help him, as he cannot keep a beat or rhythm and this may be indicitive of motor planning problems.

 

Also, I have had one counseling professional indicate that he might have a mild case of Aspberger's, but I have yet to follow up on that.

 

Thank you for your time and any help you might be able to offer!

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Guest Ronnie

Westleigh--I would not stop at the Feingold diet. That's just a piece of the pie. You need to be getting at the root of what is causing the verbal hyperactivity. The other approaches you talk about are good and might help but the basis of the problem is still there. Could be allergies, toxicities, etc. Am sure you read the Forum? Can you afford to work with a DAN! doctor on these things? That seems to be the best thing--it's all so complicated!! But there's hope. Ronnie :)

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Ronnie: What is the best way to find a DAN! doctor, and why do you feel so certain one could help? I've heard of DAN! but because my son has never actally been diagnosed with autism, and because the possibility of Aspberger's was only raise recently, most of my research over the last 5 years has gone into ADD/ADHD channels, so I'm not really familiar with the autism track of therapy. I am not sure what you mean by reading "the Forum". Do you mean information on this site? I only found this site about a week ago, so I really am a newbie at this... Thanks, Westleigh

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Guest Ronnie

Westleigh, the DAN! doctors are listed on the Autism Research Institute site (just do a search for the institute--don't have the address handy). The only thing seems to be that with the list there are some who are very experienced with autism spectrum and some who aren't, and some with more medical background than others. I can't say for sure it will help. But the idea is to see what might be the medical reason behind the problems, even if they are not severe problems.

 

I meant the Dr McCandless forum (yes, what you are on now). Sorry for not explaining. I know there was a quesion on one of the pages about aspergers and whether that could be helped with this type of approach and she said yes. I will look and if I can find it I will copy her answer for you.

 

I would also order her book Starving Brains Ronnie

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Guest Ronnie

Here is the note on Aspergers that I saw on Dr McCandless guest forum:

 

Dear Doctor, My son is high functioning aspergers; attends high school with special accomodations. Is it too late to start the types of treatments you have been talking about on this forum. Wish I had learned of this years ago. . .sigh. Would it help?

Rayna

 

 

 

 

Dr. McCandless Posted: Mar 4 2003, 11:28 AM

 

 

 

Advanced Member

 

 

Group: Members

Posts: 163

Member No.: 105

Joined: 2-March 03

 

 

 

Dear Rayna: It is never too late to help those on the spectrum - I have seen all ages even into full adulthood helped by these biomedical interventions. Everyone needs to be well nourished and chemically balanced for optimum function. If you can afford it, do an evaluation and see if there are some deficiencies, or whether chronic bowel problems are present, or whether lowering accumulated metals may help your son. You can't know until you try. Go for it!! Jaquelyn

 

 

 

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I noticed your posting was over a year ago but your son sounds very much like mine and I do encourage you to try interactive metronome and/or neurofeedback. We tried both of these therapies with great success. Good Luck.

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Hi westleigh

 

My daughter(aspergers) has the same oral stim seeking(mostly chewing hair at the moment) and is also hyper verbal very much like your son - I am interested in finding out what exactly the program is that you mentioned - for the removal of heavy metals? Can you plse let me know? Will keep checking your question as I am also still seeking advice on this one

thanks

adele

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