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Wombat140

Can Naproxen work when ibuprofen doesn't? And what dose are you using? URGENT.

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Can Naproxen work when ibuprofen doesn't? And what dose are you using?

 

I ask because things are really bad. I'm waiting to hear from a PANS specialist about arrangin tests and then treatment, but I'm not sure I'm going to be able to survive that long. I was wondering about asking my GP if she could prescribe me naproxen or something similar. Would that work, and if so, how much would she need to use (per kg and all that)? I can't take psychiatric medication owing t o my

Edited by Wombat140

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My son was just prescribed low dose naltrexone (LDN), which we will start next week. Have you looked into that?

 

Regarding Naproxen...I have heard that some do much better on naproxen than ibuprofen. 2 -3 times a day at full dose.

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Here is what the website states...

 

Dosing

 

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

 

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

 

For naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn®) tablet and oral suspension dosage forms:

For rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis:

AdultsAt first, 250 milligrams (mg) (10 milliliters (mL)/2 teaspoonfuls), 375 mg (15 mL/3 teaspoonfuls), or 500 mg (20 mL/4 teaspoonfuls) two times a day, in the morning and evening. Your doctor may increase your dose, as needed, up to a total of 1500 mg per day.

Children 2 years of age and olderDose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 5 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight two times a day.

Children younger than 2 years of ageUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For bursitis, tendonitis, menstrual cramps, and other kinds of pain:

Adults500 milligrams (mg) for the first dose, then 250 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For acute gout:

Adults750 milligrams (mg) for the first dose, then 250 mg every 8 hours until the attack is relieved.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For naproxen controlled-release tablet (e.g., Naprelan®) dosage form:

For rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis:

AdultsAt first, 750 milligrams (mg) (taken as one 750 mg or two 375 mg tablets) or 1000 mg (taken as two 500 mg tablets) once a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed, up to a total of 1500 mg (taken as two 750 mg or three 500 mg tablets) per day.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For bursitis, tendonitis, menstrual cramps, and other kinds of pain:

AdultsAt first, 1000 milligrams (mg) (taken as two 500 mg tablets) once a day. Some patients may need 1500 mg (taken as two 750 mg or three 500 mg tablets) per day, for a limited period. However, the dose is usually not more than 1000 mg per day.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For acute gout:

Adults1000 to 1500 milligrams (mg) (taken as two to three 500 mg tablets) once a day for the first dose, then 1000 mg (taken as two 500 mg tablets) once a day until the attack is relieved.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For naproxen delayed-release tablet (e.g., EC-Naprosyn®) dosage form:

For rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis:

AdultsAt first, 375 or 500 milligrams (mg) two times a day, in the morning and evening. Your doctor may increase the dose, if necessary, up to a total of 1500 mg per day.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For naproxen sodium (e.g., Anaprox®, Anaprox® DS) tablet dosage form:

For rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis:

AdultsAt first, 275 or 550 milligrams (mg) two times a day, in the morning and evening. Your doctor may increase the dose, if necessary, up to a total of 1500 mg per day.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For bursitis, tendonitis, menstrual cramps, and other kinds of pain:

Adults550 milligrams (mg) for the first dose, then 550 mg every 12 hours or 275 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed. Your doctor may increase the dose, if necessary, up to a total of 1375 mg per day.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For acute gout:

Adults825 milligrams (mg) for the first dose, then 275 mg every 8 hours until the attack is relieved.

ChildrenUse and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

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