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Just picked up the April issue of Psychology Today. Pg. 40 "The Psychobiotic Revolution". "It may be possible to relieve anxiety and depression solely by manipulating bacteria in the gut."

 

"Recently, he coined a term for the live organisms in the gut that are psychoactive and of potential benefit to those suffering from a variety of psychiatric illnesses - psychobiotics." (Yeah, they are just probiotics...)

 

Some interesting info:

A cocktail of Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum was found to reduce cortisol levels and curb inflammation.

 

Gut microbes that actively secrete GABA are Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. (Lack of GABA in the brain may bring on the negative ruminations long linked with depression.)

 

Bifidobacterium infantis as a probiotic alters levels of serotonin - just like Prozac.

 

Lactobacillus reuteri, delivered in either yogurt or supplement form, improves mood, appearance, and general health by increasing levels of oxytocin.

 

B. infantis, L. reuteri and several other strains work throughout the immune system by attacking inflammation, a hallmark of depression.

 

Lactobacillus rhamnosus reduces anxiety and depression and beefs up production of GABA receptors.

 

B. infantis and L. reuteri work on the immune system, where they suppress proinflammatory cytokines.

 

HERE's what makes me aggravated about this article. Instead of encouraging probiotic use NOW, they talk about these "therapeutic psychobiotics being a long way from reaching the market", but that you can still eat yogurt and fermented foods. They say that most probiotics don't make it past our stomach acid - but this article is from Psychology Today, so I'm sure it's not "Pharmaceutically Correct" to push anything that is already out there on the market. Sorry, but I'm fully aware that most research is paid for by the pharmaceutical companies, and they want to get their money grubbing paws on this. All of the microbes listed are in probiotics I have here in my refrigerator, and some of them are specifically made to get to the gut.

 

That rant being said, :) I'm just glad that psychiatry is starting to see the light of day! Finally realizing that the brain is actually attached to our bodies, and affected by them! Hoorah!

 

Since I pretty much typed out the whole article, I guess I should give the author credit! Thank you, Jordan Davidson.

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Taken the right way, I think probiotics make it past the acid....I do use probiotics for my son whom is a little on the odd side of the fence and I have seen wonderful benefits with mood improvement. I have also used probiotics to assist with more immediate issues in myself and family members on several different occasions: stop loose stools from the stomach flu, aide in digestions, all with instant results every single time. If they could not get past the acid, they would have been of no help at all.

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