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DS15 hasn't left the apartment voluntarily since last January. He is doing better cognitively, although he is still very stuck with OCD. We are thinking of starting home teaching. We are meeting with his HS school tomorrow and wondering what were some experiences people had.

 

TIA,

T.Anna

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Hi! My dd, 15, did home bound teaching for 80 days last year. We live in North Carolina, so I am not sure if it is the same in every state. She was assigned a teacher that came to our house each week with her assignments and tests. If I remember correctly, she had to provide 3 hours each week. The teacher would help with assignments the best that she could and also watch over my dd while she took tests. The only problem for us was that she was a history teacher and knew nothing about algebra II or French. So for us, that meant going after school to tutor with the algebra and French teacher.

 

I hope that this little bit of information helps and I wish all the best for your son and your family!

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My DS16 has been receiving home & hospital instruction services through our school system since May 2011. Prior to this, he was being transported to a special needs school 50 miles from home. After he was properly diagnosed with PANDAS/Lyme/CIVD, etc. in April 2011 we realized that he was being constantly exposed to infections. He has an extensive IEP because of his Asperger's diagnosis.

 

DS could have never tolerated the aggressive treatments we have done and have the stamina to attend school. He is still not physically well enough to go. I'm not sure when he will be able to return.

 

In our state, home instruction must be ordered by a doctor and monthly updates from the doctor are mandated. Also, my son is able to stay on home & hospital because of his physical illnesses. Our state (and maybe it's a federal guideline too) is that a child can only receive these services for more than 60 days if a physical illness keeps them from attending school. If the illness is psychiatric, a school system must find placement for the child that addresses their psychiatric needs. So if you are thinking about asking the school system you probably should steer clear of mentioning psychiatric symptoms. Stick to the physical symptoms (e.g.. fatigue, muscle weakness, joint pain, headaches, lack of stamina, sleep disturbances, etc).

 

He receives 12 hours of instruction per week. His IEP also dictates that he receive counseling services, so a social worker comes twice per week to work with him on his emotional/social goals. The biggest challenge is boredom. He is finished with school by 11:30 each day and we have strict rules about use of electronics (he is not allowed to use the computer or video games until after 3:00 and after homework is completed). So he spends his free time reading and playing with Legos. He admits he is lonely.

 

Another other challenge we have is that I am not able to leave the house during his instruction hours. A parent or someone over 18 must be present during this time. I am unable to work outside the home because of this arrangement.

 

The benefits are that he is able to learn without the stress and distractions of school and his exposures to new infections are greatly reduced. We require that anyone coming to the house to teach or spend time with him be well. All of our friends, family and support people know to stay away if they have even the slightest sniffle. The implications of catching something new are just too great for him until we can get his immune system stabilized.

 

Is this set-up ideal? No, far from it. He is missing out on social opportunities and he already struggled socially. But my husband and I along with the treating doctor believe that his health is first priority. And when he is well enough he'll catch up socially. He has been able to maintain 2 friendships through all of this and he does outside activities when he feels well enough to do so.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

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DS is enrolled in a private school, so they have some flexibility as far as curriculum.

 

Would it be better to hire my own teacher to come in and teach him a subject, i.e. math (his favorite subjects were math & science)?

 

I'm sure NYC has a few options and he qualifies medically, but I don't want a history teacher when we should probably start with math (that's one of the few cumulative subjects).

 

Thoughts?

T.Anna

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I think it's less likely you will get a math teacher based on the fact that math and science teachers are in demand and not as likely to be unemployed by school systems, especially during the day. History and English teachers are in greater supply. You might find a math teacher who is supplementing their income after school with home bound teaching. I'm not saying its impossible but I think its not likely a math teacher will roll up on homebound instruction.

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My daughter was homebound part of the last two school years. Her tutor was one of her teachers, that came to our house after school. Her specialty was Math. We received 5 hours of home instruction a week. They allowed the teacher/us to set the schedule. Some days my daughter couldn't handle any work. We also hired someone for an hour (or two) a week. She was a young spec ed teacher that kept it fun and engaging. This was elementary though - little different than the upper grades.

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Have you looking into what the state laws are for public schools in NY? In MA there are awesome laws, even dictating that private schools make certain offerings. Im sure you could look into the public program and give it a try. In MA a doctor can write a letter fill out forms for a child that is not able to attend school for medical reasons for just 14 days or more out of the entire school year. The principal must send a tutor to teach the child without delay. There is no cap on the hours provided but can not equal or exceed number of hours a child would be in school unless the IEP specifically demanded it. You do not have to be on an IEP to utilize this rule. Normally I hate all the rules in our state, but I love this one! I may use it for ds if things dont improve soon. Although he has stated that he would not want to stay at home, but wishes he could be in a school with only 5-8 students per class. I wish we could afford to send him to one, but we can not.

Explore your options with the public school and see what they have to offer.Good luck!!

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DD 15 started home school on Home & hospital last year and it continues this year as well. With raging issues home school is a no brainier. We have also been able to get through Regional Services for Behavior therapy plus a few hours of respite relief. It's been really beneficial,

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