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Herllo.

 

I was wondering if anyone had any links/info on stuttering or other ways speech may be affected in PANDAS. I mentioned our ds' stuttering as part of his presentation to someone studying speech path and they expressed an interest in learning more...

 

Thanks :)

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I don't have any links to official info. I searched quite a bit a while back. My daughter's speech is affected, too. I mentioned it to a doc at NIH involved in the PANDAS study and he wasn't sure about it, but said it might be a form of age regression since my daughter stuttered when she was younger. When Dr. Swedo met my daughter she described it as stammering. It gets very bad at times and she just gives up trying to get the words out.

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Dut-

 

IMHO stuttering can be a pandas symptom. My dd began to stutter during her worst exacerbation. She was six, had never stuttered before, and had always been extremely verbal and fluent. The stuttering lasted about 4 mos, and resolved at some point after pandas treatment.

 

I know there is info out there- here is one thing I found (didn't read it yet)

 

https://www.aacp.com/Pages.asp?AID=9159&issue=&page=&UID=

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Dut-

 

IMHO stuttering can be a pandas symptom. My dd began to stutter during her worst exacerbation. She was six, had never stuttered before, and had always been extremely verbal and fluent. The stuttering lasted about 4 mos, and resolved at some point after pandas treatment.

 

I know there is info out there- here is one thing I found (didn't read it yet)

 

https://www.aacp.com/Pages.asp?AID=9159&issue=&page=&UID=

 

 

DS also had stuttering followed by sudden inability to speak. Could be verbal tics, but also, DS turned out to have (besides strep), lyme and a lot of co-infections and viruses. So, yes, I do believe it is part of PANS (not necessarily PANDAS).

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Ditto to Misty's post above. Also extreme slowness of getting words out, stammering along the way til the response takes so long he either gives up, or just rages in frustration. This was a child who gave a student council speech and won, as well as winning grade wise spelling bee, etc. A huge degradation has occurred.

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My kiddo has no stuttering, but she stopped talking for three months. When she began speaking again, she only whispers. She has been whispering since 12-2011 with only a one month exception when she was almost 100%. We will be talking to Doctor Rao about it soon for any input he may have.

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I don't have any links to official info. I searched quite a bit a while back. My daughter's speech is affected, too. I mentioned it to a doc at NIH involved in the PANDAS study and he wasn't sure about it, but said it might be a form of age regression since my daughter stuttered when she was younger. When Dr. Swedo met my daughter she described it as stammering. It gets very bad at times and she just gives up trying to get the words out.

 

Here's the radiopandas link on stuttering (link from Hayley didn't work for me)

 

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/house-calls/2012/12/13/house-calls-wdr-trifiletti--stuttering-ocd

 

Dr. Gerald A. Maguire is a clinical psychiatrist, a Senior Associate Dean and a professor at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine. He is widely regarded as one of the world's leading experts on stuttering. In 2010, Dr. Maguire published the first documented case study of PANDAS and stuttering after treating a 6 year old boy for stuttering.

 

In 2012, Dr. Maguire presented his case study at the Irvine Conference on Autoimmune Disorders - PANDAS.

 

On this episode of House Calls w/Dr. Trifiletti, Dr. Maguire will discuss his thoughts on PANDAS, stuttering, anxiety, OCD and the use of pharmaceuticals intreating all of these.

 

Here's a little article on Dr. McGuire http://healthyliving.blog.ocregister.com/2010/11/02/new-drug-makes-uci-doc-a-smooth-talker/25280/

Edited by EAMom
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My kiddo has no stuttering, but she stopped talking for three months. When she began speaking again, she only whispers. She has been whispering since 12-2011 with only a one month exception when she was almost 100%. We will be talking to Doctor Rao about it soon for any input he may have.

 

That's interesting about the whispering. My dd hasn't ever stopped talking, but she sometimes talks extremely quietly in a flare.

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My son never stops talking either, but he has stuttered. So much so that he was tested in kinder by the speech teacher. He he very verbal; use complex sentences and advanced vocabulary for an 8 year old. So it is interesting that at times he has to start a sentence 6 or 7 times before he can get it completed. It is very frustrating to him. It comes and goes depending on if he is in a flare. I think someone did a survey earlier in the year asking about autism like characteristics and verbal delays. Many people reported stuttering and repeating of the beginnings of sentences. Hope this helps..

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My son never stops talking either, but he has stuttered. So much so that he was tested in kinder by the speech teacher. He he very verbal; use complex sentences and advanced vocabulary for an 8 year old. So it is interesting that at times he has to start a sentence 6 or 7 times before he can get it completed. It is very frustrating to him. It comes and goes depending on if he is in a flare. I think someone did a survey earlier in the year asking about autism like characteristics and verbal delays. Many people reported stuttering and repeating of the beginnings of sentences. Hope this helps..

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This can also be basal ganglia related. Parkinson's patients, can have pallilalia, a form if stuttering. Sometimes this is a side effect of meds but I've had patients who have the stutter start early in their dx. Process. I'm a speech path. Working in a setting specializing in Parkinson's disease, so I see quite a but of this.

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This can also be basal ganglia related. Parkinson's patients, can have pallilalia, a form if stuttering. Sometimes this is a side effect of meds but I've had patients who have the stutter start early in their dx. Process. I'm a speech path. Working in a setting specializing in Parkinson's disease, so I see quite a but of this.

 

 

Amy,

 

Interesting. My grandfather had Parkinson's. My son has pallilalia. Same speech issues as those above--difficulty with speech expression (at times). Starting same sentence over and over until he finally spit it out or got frustrated and gave up. Much improved over the years. Had word finding issues. Dysphasia/Aphasia. Also diagnosed with LKS, CAPD which we seem to have 'recovered' from for the most part. He became mononsyllabic about age 4 and nearly lost all speech at age 6. In a child that had developed normal speech and vocab up until that point. Has had near miraculous return through years of meds, speech therapy and supportive IEP/academics. Suspect PANDAS...much improved. Still has some compulsive tics and quirky, non debilitating OCD. All improving the older he gets-- nearly 13 now.

 

So, does this predict a foreboding he may have Parkinson's later in life??

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This can also be basal ganglia related. Parkinson's patients, can have pallilalia, a form if stuttering. Sometimes this is a side effect of meds but I've had patients who have the stutter start early in their dx. Process. I'm a speech path. Working in a setting specializing in Parkinson's disease, so I see quite a but of this.

 

 

Amy,

 

Interesting. My grandfather had Parkinson's. My son has pallilalia. Same speech issues as those above--difficulty with speech expression (at times). Starting same sentence over and over until he finally spit it out or got frustrated and gave up. Much improved over the years. Had word finding issues. Dysphasia/Aphasia. Also diagnosed with LKS, CAPD which we seem to have 'recovered' from for the most part. He became mononsyllabic about age 4 and nearly lost all speech at age 6. In a child that had developed normal speech and vocab up until that point. Has had near miraculous return through years of meds, speech therapy and supportive IEP/academics. Suspect PANDAS...much improved. Still has some compulsive tics and quirky, non debilitating OCD. All improving the older he gets-- nearly 13 now.

 

So, does this predict a foreboding he may have Parkinson's later in life??

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