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How effective is ionic foot bath for detox?

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Found this:

 

The Aqua Detox Scam

Stephen Barrett, M.D.

 

One way to scam people is to diagnose and correct a nonexistent problem. Aqua Detox practitioners do this by claiming to remove toxins and balance cellular energy. During treatment sessions, the customer's feet are bathed for 30 minutes in salt water that is subjected to a low-voltage current transmitted through an electrode assembly called an "array" (the dark cylindrical object to which the wire is attached). Aqua Detox International claims that the apparatus "produces a frequency of positive and negative ions, which gently resonates through the body and stimulates all the cells within it. . . . rebalancing the cellular energy, enabling the cells to perform efficiently and . . . release any toxins that may have built up." [1] During the process, the water typically turns reddish brown. Some marketers refer to the process as "ionic cleansing" or an "ionic foot bath."

 

Another marketer (Mobile Beauty) further explains that "the system draws toxins out through the soles of the feet" and that the "water changes color due to the release of toxic substances through the 2000 pores of the soles of the feet." It's treatment sessions typically cost £15 to £30. The company's Web site states that "You'll see the excreted toxins in the water. The water will change color and consistency—from orange, brown through to black." Yellow is said to come from the kidneys and bladder; orange/brown from the joints; green/dark brown to black from the liver, gall bladder and/or bowel; and white from the lymphatic system. Grease or fat particles may float on top of the water. According to the company, the process can be used to improve liver and kidney function; circulation; general metabolism; arthritis and joint pain; headaches; fatigue; irritability; menstrual pain; skin problems; mercury and heavy metal toxicity; food allergies, and poor digestion [2].

 

The above claims are nonsensical. Most of the listed conditions do not have a toxic basis. Positive and negative ions cannot "resonate" throughout the body in response to any such device. And the skin has no ability to excrete toxins. Real detoxification of foreign substances takes place in the liver, which modifies their chemical structure so they can be excreted by the kidneys which filter them from the blood into the urine.

 

The Aqua Detox is said to have been developed by "Dr." Mary Staggs based on "research" by Royal Rife [3]. Staggs, who is British, obtained two naturopathy degrees from a nonaccredited American correspondence school and appears to do most of her work in Spain [4]. Rife was an American inventor who, during the 1920s, claimed to have developed a powerful microscope that could detect living microbes by the color of auras emitted by their vibratory rates [5]. A survey by science journalist Ray Girvan has identified at least 19 other devices that are similar to the Aqua Detox [6]. Most of the devices sell for about £1,000.

 

Many skeptics suspected that the color change produced by the Aqua Detox was caused by rust (oxidized iron), rather than toxins. Ben Goldacre, who writes the "bad science" column for Guardian Unlimited (an online British newspaper), investigated by using a car battery to send current through two metal nails that he placed into a bowl of salt water. The water turned brown and developed some sludge on top. Then he sent a colleague to get "detoxed" and collect before-and-after water samples. Laboratory testing showed that in both cases, the change of water color was due to greatly increased iron content [7]. Thus it appears that (a) the color change is due mainly to the precipitation of rust created by corrosion of the electrodes, and (B) the water would change color regardless of whether or not a foot was placed in it.

 

The Guardian Unlimited article has had some impact on how the Aqua Detox and its imitators are marketed. Some marketers admit that the colors are due entirely to electrode conversion, and there is less emphasis on toxin removal and more emphasis on the "balancing" of "energy" that is not measurable with scientific instruments (and is therefore untestable.) But the bottom line is very simple. All such devices should be considered medically worthless.

 

References

Research for Aqua Detox. Aqua Detox International Web site, accessed Dec 27, 2004.

Miracle Beauty home page, accessed Dec 27, 2004.

American Cancer Society. Questionable methods of cancer management: Electronic devices. CA—A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 44:115-127, 1994.

Harris G. A detox to make your toes curl. Daily Telegraph, June 6, 2003.

Mary Staggs. Biographical information on Contact Reflex Analysis and Nutritional research Foundation Web site, accessed Dec 27, 2004.

Girvan R. Dodgy detox. Apothecary's Drawer Weblog, May 28, 2004.

Goldacre B. Rusty results. Guardian Unlimited, Sept 2, 2004.

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while I have no knowledge of this product I would still question one thing from that article posted above

 

The above claims are nonsensical. Most of the listed conditions do not have a toxic basis. Positive and negative ions cannot "resonate" throughout the body in response to any such device. And the skin has no ability to excrete toxins. Real detoxification of foreign substances takes place in the liver, which modifies their chemical structure so they can be excreted by the kidneys which filter them from the blood into the urine.

 

many conditions and illnesses do have toxic components and the skin most certainly is one of the detoxing organs..........sweating isnt just to keep ya cool ;)

 

my son uses a footbath with good ole Epsom salts dissolved in warm water and tho it doesnt change color unless his feet are dirty LOL yet it definitely has a detox effect, just as the epsom salts full baths do (sulfer)

similarly people have been using natural hot springs, which have high sulfer content, for detox and healing for centuries

 

so where this Stephen Barrett MD may well be right on the mark re the scam in these ionic foot baths and pads, he seems to follow the "anything that isnt MD approved is quackery" line a bit too emphatically there

 

JMHO

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Chemar - I agree. I'm sticking with the good old fashioned Epsom salts, too. Just thought I'd post for somebody who was thinkng of dropping $400 on an ionic foot soaker.

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I just moved to the Kansas City area and want to try this foot bath thing. I've heard a lot about it and i think i'm finally going to do it. Has anyone in the area had this done and can they recommend a place for me?

 

thanks

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We do the epson salt soaks also..do you feel just soaking the feet is as effective as the baths. I had my son do the bath a few times but he gets so bored in the tub...i hear less complaining when he can sit on a chair and read a book while soaking.

Mary

 

while I have no knowledge of this product I would still question one thing from that article posted above

 

The above claims are nonsensical. Most of the listed conditions do not have a toxic basis. Positive and negative ions cannot "resonate" throughout the body in response to any such device. And the skin has no ability to excrete toxins. Real detoxification of foreign substances takes place in the liver, which modifies their chemical structure so they can be excreted by the kidneys which filter them from the blood into the urine.

 

many conditions and illnesses do have toxic components and the skin most certainly is one of the detoxing organs..........sweating isnt just to keep ya cool ;)

 

my son uses a footbath with good ole Epsom salts dissolved in warm water and tho it doesnt change color unless his feet are dirty LOL yet it definitely has a detox effect, just as the epsom salts full baths do (sulfer)

similarly people have been using natural hot springs, which have high sulfer content, for detox and healing for centuries

 

so where this Stephen Barrett MD may well be right on the mark re the scam in these ionic foot baths and pads, he seems to follow the "anything that isnt MD approved is quackery" line a bit too emphatically there

 

JMHO

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Mary,

 

Pomegranates are in season! Try giving him a pomegranate in the bathtub. (I call it the "babysitter.") It's half food and half toy; and pomegranates are best eaten when naked because they stain anything in a 5-foot radius. If I recall they are a very high source of b6 with some antibacterial, antifungal properties as well.

 

I put my kids in the bathtub with them and then sit in the hall and read. They usually spend about an hour in there. Oh, and they are quiet too.

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We do the epson salt soaks also..do you feel just soaking the feet is as effective as the baths. I had my son do the bath a few times but he gets so bored in the tub...i hear less complaining when he can sit on a chair and read a book while soaking.

Mary

 

Hi Mary

yes, interestingly my son is preferring the Epsom Salts foot baths to the full body tubs at present.

He can use it while at computer or reading or whatever and finds it very soothing.

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Thanks I thought i read here somewhere that the mag. absorbs in the body from where ever it starts. If i can get him to do it this way and it helps, i will continue.

 

We never had Pomegranates will have to give them a try...don't know if that would keep him content in there or not... the only thing that would keep him content is if he could have his pet turlles in with him, but don't think they would like the epson salts ;)

Mary

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Hello,

I am a supporter of many different forms of cleansing and detoxification. The most recent one I have come across is the ionic foot detox. I understand much of the skepticism surrounding this subject. Basically it comes down to the science behind it, or lack of in this case.

 

To understand how the foot detox machine works, you need to have an understanding of energy medicine. Although there have been numerous studies over the years, this science is still more theory than proof. The theories are currently being discussed by physicists worldwide. If you want to blow your mind about the possibilities, study quantum physics. If want want a fun introduction watch the movie "what the bleep do we know".

 

Along with the theories of quantum physics you can research modern chemistry. It is very clear that our bodies function on an energetic level and that energy is a form of electricity.

 

Skeptics are just too quick to dismiss what is not totally understood. There are doctors and scientists that are willing to look beyond what is taught in today's medical schools. These MD's and Naturopaths who specialize in integrative medicine are at the for front of changing our modern healthcare system. Look up Dr Mark Hyman for an MD's opinion of detoxification. Recognizing the need for cleansing and detoxification is becoming fundamental to preventative health care as well as a foundational starting point toward reversing the damage so many people have done to themselves.

 

The best evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of an ionic foot detox is still the patient testimonial. It is what got me to try it and then it got me to invest in my own machine. I would suggest anyone interested look for a local practitioner and try a session or preferably a series. Talk with other people who have tried them. I now work with practitioners in New Mexico and they all report some pretty amazing results. One thing to remember, as with any health regimen, a treatment will have different effects on different people. Two people may share the same symptom but may have a totally different cause. The basic principle of balancing the body's energy system and helping it to regain it's own health in a systematic way of its own is what an ionic detox machine does.

 

Thanks and good luck!

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Yes, I have tried the Ionic Footbath. Actually I own one. I was very impressed with the Ionic when I was first introduced to it last year. Since then I have started developing educational programs around Ionic Footbath, Ionic Water, Ionic Clothing, Detoxification, Cleaning, Etc.

 

I know quite a bit about the Anatomy of the Ions, so let me know if you have any questions.

 

 

Regards, Jeannette

Global Touch Health Care Education

 

 

Hi Jeannette, I'd be interested to know more about ions... what materials would you recommend?

 

 

Also, has anyone here in the forum tried to run the detox foot spa WITHOUT PUTTING ANYTHING (i.e. feet) IN THE WATER ? I suspect it would still change colour -- can anyone prove/disprove my hypothesis?

 

Thanks,

E

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Hello, I am a healthcare practitioner in the Buffalo, Ny region and I use the Ion foot detox for many of my patients. Many people are unsure if these units work and I would liek to post some support for this unit, if of course it is a registered unit. We have had patients tested for heavy metals with results exceeding the acceptable levels. We used just the Ion foot detox unit to remove these metals and after approximately 15 sessions re-tested to have the patient now within normal levels.

 

Even from the standpoint of just removing some of the inflamatory responses within the body these units help, however just because you remove the antaginist does not mean nothings else may be done. Please investigate where the exposure occured and if you are still exposed to this issue, make life style changes that are healthier, find a functional medecine practitioner to truly put you on the path of optimal health and for gods sake please always ask your primary care giver to test your vitamin D levels a nd if they are below 50 supplement and have retested within 3 months to see if you are improving and if the level is high enough for you to do so.

 

Good health to all and if you have any questions feel free to ask.

 

Dr. Derek Middleton

QD, QESD. LE

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