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Hi - I was wondering if anyone ( LLM? :) ) could give me a quick answer re the 2 tests. A quick glance at 23andme shows it includes APOE which is a marker for Alzheimer's. My father had AD and this isn't something that with current available treatments I would want to know about, either for me or my kids. I personally, wouldn't want to know my susceptibility for this unless there were more concrete/effective treatments.

 

Does Yasko's testing (as at a quick glance I believe it to) just test for methylation type SNPs? I'll go thru the individual SNPs but wondered if someone had a quick answer, save me the trouble. Do they test for the idleitis SNP :)

Edited by dut
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T think you'd be safe with Yasko's test - it seems to "only" test genes along the methylation pathway. 23andMe tests over 900 SNPs (some one the same gene). This is one comparison - but only comparing methylation pathway genes...

 

http://www.mthfrsupport.com/articles.html

 

I found this site yesterday that lists SNPs by disease category - everything with an "A" in the right column is tested by 23andMe

http://www.eupedia.com/genetics/psychological_dna_test.shtml

 

I can't find anything on idleitis - didn't show up on snpedia.com either. Do you know what the letter abbreviation or the alphanumeric code for the gene(s)? You could probably call 23andMe and ask, or perhaps the people at facebook's MTHFRSupport page?

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"A quick glance at 23andme shows it includes APOE which is a marker for Alzheimer's. My father had AD and this isn't something that with current available treatments I would want to know about, either for me or my kids. I personally, wouldn't want to know my susceptibility for this unless there were more concrete/effective treatments."

 

23 and me locks the results for Alzheimer's, Parkinsons and some cancer markers. You have to go through several "clicks" to unlock them so you don't have to view them at all if you don't want to.

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This is good to know. Is it obvious that you have to click? Waiting for results and wondering how complicated it's going to be to interpret data...

 

 

 

Yes it is obvious-- the locked results are at the top of one of the health reports with little lock emblems- and if you click on it, you still have to confirm on the next page so it is pretty hard to see it by accident. You will be able to see and understand the results pretty easily in the categories of disease risk, carrier status, drug response and traits. This will not give you the methylation results though. You have to down load the raw data and put it in the Genetics Genie or have someone who knows how to interpret have access to your raw data.

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This is good to know. Is it obvious that you have to click? Waiting for results and wondering how complicated it's going to be to interpret data...

 

 

 

Yes it is obvious-- the locked results are at the top of one of the health reports with little lock emblems- and if you click on it, you still have to confirm on the next page you want to see it, so it is impossible to view by accident. You will be able to see and understand the results pretty easily in the categories of disease risk, carrier status, drug response and traits. This will not give you the methylation results though. You have to down load the raw data and put it in the Genetics Genie or have someone who knows how to interpret have access to your raw data.

 

My spouse and I both have our results from 23andme under 1 account. I wanted to know my Alzheimer's and Parkinson results, he didn't. So that is what we did. Whenever I review my results the results are shown. If I toggle to his name, the results are still locked and unknown. I could unlock them, since it is all under 1 account (one user name, one password), but I respect his wishes. Someday, if he changes his mind, they will be available. If you want to keep your results completely private, then when you register, register under separate accounts.

 

We had other reasons other than Methylation issues as to why he pursued 23andme testing. We have allowed our test results to be shared with several adult children. When they see our reports, or when we see theirs, any of the sensitive results (Alzheimer's, Parkinsons,etc) that you had to unlock to view ARE NOT available at all. It is like they do not exist. They won't show up under Disease, under Technical Reports, not anywhere.

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Here are my son's Genetics Genie results after putting the 23 and Me raw data into it- for those that are curious!

 

Methylation Analysis Results

Gene & Variation rsID Alleles Result

COMT V158M rs4680 AG +/-

COMT H62H rs4633 CT +/-

COMT -61 P199P rs769224 GG -/-

VDR Bsm rs1544410 CT +/-

VDR Taq rs731236 AG +/-

VDR Fok I

MAO A R297R rs6323 T +

ACAT1-02 rs3741049 GG -/-

MTHFR C677T rs1801133 AG +/-

MTHFR 03 P39P rs2066470 GG -/-

MTHFR A1298C rs1801131 TT -/-

MTR A2756G rs1805087 AA -/-

MTRR A66G rs1801394 AG +/-

MTRR H595Y rs10380 CC -/-

MTRR K350A rs162036 AA -/-

MTRR R415T rs2287780 CC -/-

MTRR S275T

MTRR A664A rs1802059 AG +/-

BHMT-01

BHMT-02 rs567754 CC -/-

BHMT-04 rs617219 AA -/-

BHMT-08 rs651852 CC -/-

ACHY-01 rs819147 CT +/-

ACHY-02 rs819134 AG +/-

ACHY-19 rs819171 CT +/-

CBS C699T rs234706 AG +/-

CBS A360A rs1801181 GG -/-

CBS N212N rs2298758 GG -/-

SUOX S370S

NOS 3 D298E

SHMT1 C1420T rs1979277 AG +/-

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one thing about knowing your genetic mutations, actually two. First, mutation does not mean anything. or, better, science today does not know exactly what it means (if I understand that one correctly). you have to correlate it with symptoms and even then you won't be sure what the cause is.

second, by the time our kids reach the age that they might get Parkinsons, it will be a different world. no point in worrying about that one today or even thinking about it, as far as I am concerned.

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one thing about knowing your genetic mutations, actually two. First, mutation does not mean anything. or, better, science today does not know exactly what it means (if I understand that one correctly). you have to correlate it with symptoms and even then you won't be sure what the cause is.

second, by the time our kids reach the age that they might get Parkinsons, it will be a different world. no point in worrying about that one today or even thinking about it, as far as I am concerned.

 

I totally agree that there's more unknown than known about epigenetics right now. But I do think if you can identify a gene mutation and your symptoms correlate with the symptoms a genetic deficiency would cause, then it is very possible to work around that defect and alleviate the symptoms. Had I not pursued the MTHFR testing, my DD would be on bi-polar meds by now. It was getting severe. But this year, she sailed thru her worst season with barely a blip of mood issues, all because of a small amount of methylated vitamins. So I do think that for some kids, their answers lie here and tho we know only a fraction of what we'll know 20 years from know, science knew enough about this particular genetic mutation that I was able to find a successful alternative to psychotropic meds for my 8 yr old.

 

I agree that worrying about genetic pre-dispositions for "old age" diseases is a waste of energy, I disagree that nothing can be done about it today. My DD and I have a much higher risk of heart disease, stroke and macular degeneration because of our MTHFR mutation and a long list of relatives who've suffered from these diseases. But by taking methylated B9 and B12, we might be greatly reducing our risks of developing these diseases. I do think there's a way from keeping a genetic light switch from being turned on by keeping the surrounding conditions "normal". In the same way people change their diet to reduce their risk of heart disease or cancer, I think you can do the same by treating your specific mutations with specific, individualized supplements. Could I be wrong? Entirely. Could I still develop the diseases that run in the family? Absolutely. But I will also do everything in my power to improve the odds that I dodge the bullet. I will also do everything I can to do the same for my kids. I can't control everything and there is so much unknown about epigenetics. But that's not going to stop me from doing what I can with the knowledge I can get today. For my DD, it's already changed her life in very dramatic ways.

 

Of course people are free to disagree. That's what makes this forum so helpful.

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to respond directly to LLM's comment.

We are doing exactly what you are, namely we treat genetic mutation as best as we understand its correlation with the symptoms, we monitor the effects of supplements, and so on. BUT, there is at least this thing, when you start doing something, you cannot know what would have happened if you did not do it. The condition could have improved without the intervention.

Further, improvement depends on criteria that are changeable.

 

it is frustrating that science is not helping us much. most medical research is oriented toward solutions that work for everyone. solutions are taken in a rather simplistic manner as if organisms were not extremely complex and unique entities. and we, parents, are left to try and make some sense and figure out what works for our children.

Thank God, we have this forum.

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