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Maternal history of autoimmune disease


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Abstract.Cannot get the full text.

 

Maternal history of autoimmune disease in children presenting with tics and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20864184

 

Maternal history of autoimmune disease in children presenting with tics and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Murphy TK, Storch EA, Turner A, Reid JM, Tan J, Lewin AB.

 

Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA. tmurphy@health.usf.edu

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: A commonality across a number of pediatric neuropsychiatric disorders is a higher than typical rate of familial - and especially maternal - autoimmune disease. Of recent interest, a subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tic disorders known collectively as Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) is believed to be secondary to central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity that occurs in relation to group A streptococcal infection. Thus, we hypothesized that a sample of children with OCD and/or tics would have an increased maternal risk for an autoimmune response relative to population norms. We also expected maternal prevalence of various autoimmune diseases to be higher among those participants that met the putative criteria for PANDAS.

 

METHODS: We examined, via structured interview, the medical history of the biological mothers of 107 children with OCD and/or tics.

 

RESULTS: Autoimmune disorders were reported in 17.8% of study mothers, which is significantly greater than the general prevalence among women in the United States (approximately 5%). Further, study mothers were more likely to report having an autoimmune disease if their children were considered "likely PANDAS" cases versus "unlikely PANDAS" cases.

 

CONCLUSIONS: The results offer preliminary support for hypothesized links between maternal autoimmune disease and both OCD/tics and PANDAS in youth. Further research is necessary to clarify these general associations; links to specific autoimmune disease; and relevance of autoimmune disease in other family members (e.g., fathers).

 

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20864184 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]PMCID: PMC2991439 [Available on 2011/12/1]

Edited by Vickie
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Guest TwinCitiesMom

Abstract.Cannot get the full text.

 

Maternal history of autoimmune disease in children presenting with tics and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20864184

 

Maternal history of autoimmune disease in children presenting with tics and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Murphy TK, Storch EA, Turner A, Reid JM, Tan J, Lewin AB.

 

Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA. tmurphy@health.usf.edu

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: A commonality across a number of pediatric neuropsychiatric disorders is a higher than typical rate of familial - and especially maternal - autoimmune disease. Of recent interest, a subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tic disorders known collectively as Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) is believed to be secondary to central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity that occurs in relation to group A streptococcal infection. Thus, we hypothesized that a sample of children with OCD and/or tics would have an increased maternal risk for an autoimmune response relative to population norms. We also expected maternal prevalence of various autoimmune diseases to be higher among those participants that met the putative criteria for PANDAS.

 

METHODS: We examined, via structured interview, the medical history of the biological mothers of 107 children with OCD and/or tics.

 

RESULTS: Autoimmune disorders were reported in 17.8% of study mothers, which is significantly greater than the general prevalence among women in the United States (approximately 5%). Further, study mothers were more likely to report having an autoimmune disease if their children were considered "likely PANDAS" cases versus "unlikely PANDAS" cases.

 

CONCLUSIONS: The results offer preliminary support for hypothesized links between maternal autoimmune disease and both OCD/tics and PANDAS in youth. Further research is necessary to clarify these general associations; links to specific autoimmune disease; and relevance of autoimmune disease in other family members (e.g., fathers).

 

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20864184 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]PMCID: PMC2991439 [Available on 2011/12/1]

Interesting for sure. We have paternal greatgrandmother with rapid onset rheumatoid arthritis, maternal great uncle died of rheumatic fever, and I have hashimoto's throiditis, along with severe seasonal allergies on both sides.

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