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Diet - Where to Start


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I have no knowledge about alternative diets, but I would like to try it as complimentary to our antibiotic treatment. I know that anything white is not good...but I have no idea how to cook and cut out white sugar, etc. and it seems so daunting.

 

Where should I start? A book - any recommendations? A consult with a nutritionist? I also don't know where to focus - eliminate sugar cooking? anti-imflammatory cooking?

 

Any advice and pointers would be helpful. Thanks.

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Alternative diets are a lot of work to get started, but once you get in the groove it all becomes a habit that can be maintained. It's all about forming new habits and behaviors.

 

Might be good to see a naturopath to decide what type of alternative diet is best or to do some food sensitivity testing to be sure you don't end up overloading on something that is actually causing more issues (ie eggs).

 

We have always done diets based on the idea of reducing candida(yeast) because of the antibiotics. You can google candida diet and find lots of sites that list foods that are ok, foods that are bad and recipes. www.thecandidadiet.com has lots of info. There are also a number of good books (The Yeast Connection Cookbook) that can be helpful. There are natural substitutes for sugar (ie. xylitol and stevia) so you can reduce sugar intake. You can eliminate wheat and use gluten free grains for cooking (use xantham gum to get baked goods to stick together without the gluten). The gluten free gourmet has good cookbooks - just use substitutes when it calls for dairy (ie. rice milk, almond milk, water). I also like the book 1,000 Gluten-Free Recipes by Carol Fenster.

 

I know it will seem like too much to take on, but once you get into you new eating habits you will forget what you used to eat and it will be much easier.

 

P.S. I suggest to stay away from red dye in foods ...

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Hi, Ange!

Per my previous blogs, check out Dr. Natasha Campbell-Mcbride's work.

 

http://www.westonaprice.org/childrens-health/1379-gaps.html

 

http://www.westonaprice.org/modern-diseases/digestive-disorders/1955-food-allergies.html

 

http://www.gapsdiet.com/INTRODUCTION_DIET.html

 

 

Gutandpsychologysyndrome.com

 

Raw sugar and organic cane sugar in small amounts should be okay. Keep off the grains, dairy and legumes to heal the gut. Dr NCM above sez it all.

 

Hard to implement, I know. Try it on yourself, see what happens. Do just meats or seafood, veggies and eggs and nuts. More fats, less carbs. The brain is 70 percent fat. Kids need a lot of fat, think about it, breast milk provides them- why do we stop giving fats after we breastfeed?

Good luck and have fun reading. She is very persuasive.

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There are lots of different approaches out there. How about starting with thinking like your grandmother or greatgrandmother did? A diet of real food. For breakfast eggs and toast. For lunch soup and a sandwich. For dinner a roasted or baked chicken, some mashed potatoes (from real potatoes), a salad or peas, and some whole grain bread? If you aren't 'cooking' right now, I think it would be too big a jump to the variety of specialized diet approaches out there.

 

Also, I agree with the idea that you might think about trying some food sensitivity/IGg testing for intolerant foods...that might help focus your efforts. For instance, if you really did need to pull gluten (wheat, rye, barley and oats) and casein (all milk products and processed foods with casein in them) then you would very quickly be able to find a lot of on-line resources to help you transition to your new diet.

 

I always tell my daughter that we need more 'slow foods' (proteins like nut butters, turkey, beans, healthy meats) and whole grains) to keep away the yeasties. I tell her the yeasties are 'lazy' and only like to eat the 'quick and easy' foods (which you know are highly processed with corn syrup, white flour, and additives, or simple starches like potato chips, crackers and pretzles, and even too much fruit and juices).

 

Good luck and keep asking questions!!!

 

Malke

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We started easing our way into a Candida diet this past weekend and I have been craving carbs like crazy!! Today seems a little better though. I think our entire family will be better off on the diet. It will force us to cook more rather than being tempted to buy prepared foods. When we really thought about everything we feed our kids we realized it's all packed with sugars and carbs! Does anyone have any recommendations for yeast free bread. I found this one on Amazon but I'm not sure how good it will be and it does have some carbs.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001ACNWY8/ref=ord_cart_shr?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER

 

I ordered a cookbook on Amazon this past weekend. I'll let you know how it is when it arrives.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0658002929/ref=oss_product

 

I agree that once you get some recipes and ingredients under your belt, it should get easier (at least that's what I'm trying to tell myself).

 

 

-Vicky

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I must say - changing our diet was one of the better things we've done for our ds (and ourselves!)

Having cut gluten, dairy, sugar, most grains, legumes and potatoes from our diet, we found adding avocado to our diet really helped with cravings...it's become a staple. And substituting honey, pure maple syrup, xyletol for white sugar works well.

I agree it would be worth finding out what food sensitivities you're dealing with and then you can modify your diet to suit. Good luck!

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I've had my dd5 gluten free/casein free for 1 1/2 years- she responded wonderfully to it- started eating all kinds of protein (she refused ANY meat before removing gluten and casein)

When I had a phone consult w/a PANDAS Dr. last week, I mentioned my daughter had completely pulled herself off milk right after she turned 2- refused choc. milk, fun straws, etc. NO milk.

He said milk does not help w/autoimmune- some sort of connection (I'd never heard that before)

Also, it is said gluten and auto-immune disorders can affect one another (although she does not have celiac disease)

She is nutrionally sound now that we pulled those 2 things-- her diet and food selections opened up...I try very hard to limit her sugar intake (yeah, happy Valentines/candy day)

I just told myself I'd try it for 3 months- and if I saw nothing, I could always go back.

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