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Lyme Chime


JAG10
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Not knowing much about the lyme part of the pitands puzzle, it seemes to me that the ILADS lyme specialists could become the pitands specialists in our country? What type of doctors are the ilads doctors? ID's, immunologists? from the last post, it seems they have the big picture of the often times complex nature of infection triggered autoimmunity.

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I wasn't able to find incidence percentages of symptoms....and the symptom list just goes on and on...

 

On the recommendation of Pacificmama, I did check out Ann Corson and found this slide (not really sure how it will post, sorry) on incidence of coinfections with Bb as the star of the show. This is not population at large, just during a time frame in her practice. Thought it was interesting since I live about an hour from her office.

 

 

Local prevalence of coinfections

 80% coinfected

 40% two infections

 26% three infections

 9% four or more infections

 100% had Borrelia burgdorferi

 32% Ehrlichia chaffeensis (HME)

 30% Bartonella henselae

 25% Babesia microti

 13% Mycoplasma fermentans

 9% Anaplasma phagocytophilum

(HGA)

 8% had both HME and HGA

77 pediatric patients, aged 10 months to 19 years, evaluated

in my practice between July 2003 and July 2005

Corson, AF. A Family Doctor's Perspective on Tick-Borne Diseases

In Children. The Lyme Times Summer 2006; Children's Education

Issue: p. 3-6

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I wasn't able to find incidence percentages of symptoms....and the symptom list just goes on and on...

 

On the recommendation of Pacificmama, I did check out Ann Corson and found this slide (not really sure how it will post, sorry) on incidence of coinfections with Bb as the star of the show. This is not population at large, just during a time frame in her practice. Thought it was interesting since I live about an hour from her office.

 

 

interesting -- i haven't listened to that yet but plan to. i don't see strep listed there -- did i miss something or is that not something that she tracked? could that be included under the 2, 3 , or 4 infections but not specifically mentioned?

 

just from my thoughts of people i have met -- strep seems common with lyme. i dont' know if that's been a studied connection or if the thought is that strep is "common" anyway or if most believe lyme makes it hard to kick other infections, strep just being one of them and not specifically studied as a "co-infection"?

Edited by smartyjones
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I may be mistaken but I think the %'s above are for tick-borne diseases (infections transmitted by ticks). Ex...bartonella & babesia, Bb & Babesia & HME.

 

Yes, that's right. And this info is not from her presentation last week, it's older than that. But that is what separates strep and myco-p from the other "co-infections", they are passed via human secretion. I know myco-p is listed that is can be insect transmitted as well, but is that a different type of myco?

 

But, based on her info above, we don't ALL have all these infections if you extensively test. However, it seems there is a good possibility at any given point in time a large number of people would pop positive for strep, myco-p and Bb, right?

 

Another question.....we don't know how long it takes for titers to fall for strep (many months?) or myco-p (many years?) What about the measurements for tick/insect transmitted diseases? Do you treat them until they are undetectable by blood test or until the person is asymptomatic??

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