Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

Cova

Members
  • Content Count

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Cova

  • Rank
    Newbie

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Just saw this after @cary sent me a message. Apologies if I am not more responsive! My response to the message, please tag me if you can. That prompts an email notification! Yes, there is/was/will be regression. Our doctor, Dr. Imber, said that this is completely normal and should be expected. Growth spurts, stress, colds, bad sleep, etc, can all trigger it. We noticed some regression recently, but that was also due to a looming first day of kindergarten and a light cold we were passing around (at least that's what we attribute them to). But from where they were, wha
  2. @sarotchka Reposting this from another thread. I should have been more specific to begin with. Re: specific exercises. The first thing the doctor keyed in on was whether the tics were happening on one side. I.e., was the chin stretch, shoulder roll, etc. predominately occurring on one side. He said that if that was the case, which it was, the chances of success in the reduction of symptoms was much greater than if they were happening on both sides. A couple examples of treatment: He placed a little "hat" on our son that had a light attached to the center, that was basical
  3. @edsonr Hi, yes, definitely. The first thing the doctor keyed in on was whether the tics were happening on one side. I.e., was the chin stretch, shoulder roll, etc. predominately occurring on one side. He said that if that was the case, which it was, the chances of success in the reduction of symptoms was much greater than if they were happening on both sides. A couple examples of treatment: He placed a little "hat" on our son that had a light attached to the center, that was basically in the middle of his forehead. He then sat our son in front of a large picture with dots pla
  4. Hi...our son had the exact two tics you described, the constant throat clearing and the shoulder roll. I just posted my first post here a couple days ago on our experience if you are interested in reading about it. Long story short, is that we went from pediatric neurologist to psychiatrist to a PANDAs doctor...and nothing worked/sat well until someone recommended a functional neurologist. We are in Illinois, and were recommended Dr. Matthew Imber out of Lemont. Of all the online searches for help with tics we never stumbled across such a doctor or recommendation, and by working with him f
  5. They were specific to our son, as I believe the focus was on strengthening the right side of his brain. While the exercises appeared simple and almost geared to kids, I would most certainly not do it justice by trying to remember the number of repetitions, cadence, and exact protocol. And while they did appear quite simple, the vast majority of his clientele were kids and adults much older than our five year old. I truly wish I could simply tell you the things to do to help, but it’s not that straightforward. Our doctor noted that tic cases differ considerably and there is no one size fit
  6. Hi everyone! New here, first post, but one my wife and I felt was important to share with everyone here that is struggling with tics. I'll start from the beginning: Our five year old son started a throat clearing tic last December. At first we thought it was just dry in our house, and tried to help him by adding moisture to the air. It quickly became one after another after another. Nonstop. We knew something was up but tried to ignore it mostly and started doing a little research. A friend of my wife's suggested it was a tic, similar to what her son had, and that ignoring it woul
×
×
  • Create New...