Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

aba

Members
  • Content Count

    41
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    aba reacted to SurfMom in Diagnosed in 2012, Likely the Most Difficult Case Ever - Now Near Normal.   
    I am checking as the mom much farther down the road to be a help, if I can. My daughter was diagnosed in November 2012. This is our five year anniversary with this disease and there is HOPE for all of your kids. This is long but please read: 

    With one of the most profound and difficult to treat cases to  ever treat - my daughter is staring community college in the spring!
    You name the symptom and she has exhibited it - to name a few... complex tics,  anorexia, bed wetting, mutism, depression, OCD, sleep disorders,  a host of psychiatric symptoms (including schizoprhenic type symptoms including violence), and catatonia.
    She has also had every treatment - countless antibiotics, IVIVGs, rituximab, cell cept, prophylactic antibiotix, cytoxan, tociluzimab.
    We lost four years of life - she lost high school, and I shut down ever yaspect of life to take care of her.
    It has been lonely, frustrating, difficult, depressing...and yet hopeful, strengthening, funny, and finally TRIUMPHANT.
    I am repositing something a wrote in 2015 to give you all some encouragement and some general advice - especially to parents of children who are most severely affected. After I wrote this my daughter's trajectory slowed, but we found tociluzumab was the treatment that finally rounded out her recovery and though she still has some memory loss and is still making her way back academically. We know that she is going to have a NORMAL LIFE. Just a year ago, I thought she would always be with us, never have a job, never have friends...and now she is learning to drive and starting college classes (with a little support from special services)  in a few weeks. Now she is running, swimming, laughing, talkative, and back to her old self - volunteering at a local library and worried about her hair and makeup (you have no idea what a big deal that is). Remember that every child presents differently and the part of the autoimmune system that is affected - and therefore the treatment that works - is different for each child. That said, PM me or ask me here and I will try to start checking in now that I too have my own life back.
    Hang in there....it will get better... Here is the 2015 post. 
    My daughter has one of the most severe and drug-resistant cases of what falls under the big umbrella of a strep-induced autoimmune disorder that left her with severe neurological and significant joint involvement. For those who don't remember us, my daughter was an exceptional student and athlete, and world's happiest and easy child to raise - until the bottom fell out two years ago. In a matter of a days she suddenly and frighteningly developed Sydenham's chorea, tics, mutism, mood swings, joint pain and swelling. aversions, delusions, rage and host of other heart-breaking symptoms. It has been a tremendously challenging road and so as an unwilling seasoned veteran here is the advice I am giving to anyone who thinks their child has PANDAS, PANS, LYME or any other unusual/frustrating unnamed condition.
     
    1. Do NOT waste time. The first time you see symptoms that do not clear up permanently after a round of antibiotics, get real help. Any of the symptoms I have described indicate your child has neurological inflammation. For the majority of kids, this could mean your child has cross-reacting antibodies, that are attacking your child's healthy tissues. For many kids this could involve brain, heart or joint problems so you absolutely need to rule out any potential damage, especially heart involvement (this was the one potential result our daughter had). The longer you go, the more damage that can result and the harder it will be to treat. This means:
     
    2. Your child has a PHYSICAL disease with psychiatric symptoms resulting from inflammation so you need the right specialists. If your child has recurrent or ongoing flares after antibiotic treatment, and you are only seeing a psychiatrist or PANDAS doctor who has not done a full spectrum of physical diagnostics (MRI, heart ultrasound, tests for Lyme, allergies, inflammatory markers, titers, etc.) then ask your pediatrician for a pediatric neurologist referral. Remember this is PHYSICAL. I can't emphasize this enough: If you can, go see a neurologist and an immunologist. 
     
    3. It's not in a name, so don't get stuck with a label. I know we all want that relief/satisfaction of saying my child has "PANDAS" or some other condition, but that can predispose physicians to start treating before a real diagnosis and plan is put forth. For example, we ran off immediately to USF for PANDAS evaluation, at which they gave us some surveys, talked to us and then tossed us some antibiotics with a diagnosis of PANDAS. Not one physical diagnostic test was done and we were foolish to go along with that. In time, they would have ramped up to IVIG, etc....but I would never have known that my daughter could have had heart damage. For those wanting a name., honestly, ( For the math-minded I think we are talking about a spectrum of autoimmune diseases that could be plotted on a coordinate plane of X and symptoms on Y, to find that our kids are scattered all over the place) I think there are as many names for these diseases as there are kids. Just call it, "Insert your child's name here" disease. I am kidding - but also not. The many presentations of these diseases explain why they sound akin to others (like Lupus) and yet different when we talk to each other here. Also, never mention diagnosis to insurance providers. Many are looking for reasons to reject claims so let your doctors and insurance companies play the coding game. 
     
    4. Take meticulous notes regarding symptoms.Take pictures and video even at bad times. Trust me, you will forget. Look for subtle things like handwriting and appetite changes, sleeping changes, expression of unusual ideas, reduced speech. When first met our neurologist, I came in not with a disease name but a table of symptoms, date of onset, severity and frequency. I wanted them to diagnose without predisposition. 
      5. Don't worry about the bandaids - yet. I know a lot of us sweat everything from glutens, to certain amino acids to micronutrients. Until you rule out allergies, known genetic deficiencies....don't lie awake at night and wonder whether or not you are missing some esoteric piece of the puzzle. Feed your child well, make sure they are getting plenty of vitamin D (low is usually indicative of a chronic inflammatory process), and as many nutrients as they can from real food. You are a good parent, and while the little things will help along with a healthy lifestyle, there is no magic pill. Proper diagnostics will eliminate a lot of concern about allergies and root causes so you don't waste a fortune in time and money trying this and that. We are desperate and vulnerable so read everything with a critical eye. 
     
    6. Trust your gut and assert yourself. I went to FOUR doctors and had three ER visits with my daughter, shaking my head and respectfully telling them we were moving on when they told me she was probably just depressed. WRONG. (Tangents: I think our world, present and past is full of kids who are under-diagnosed for physical problems, and there is NO difference between mental health and health. It's just health). 
    7. Your child is not your child. There is no way that sweet baby of yours would ever do the things he/she is doing if he/she was healthy. Easier said than done - but do not take it personally. That said, reasonable consequences apply. If your child is having severe outbursts, you have to remind yourself: THIS IS THE DISEASE. Say it like a mantra if you have to. 
    8. Get healthy and fit. I have had to care for my daughter for two years 24/7. Most of you will not be like that. It's going to try your body, mind and spirit. It's going to be hard so you need to be battle prepared. At times, you are going to be scared, angry, tired, frustrated and lonely so you are going to need to be at your best like no other time in your life. Get sleep and don't worry if there are fingerprints on the appliances and the car needs vacuuming. My family has learned that no matter what, I am taking an hour a day to run or surf. 
    9. Get brave and tough.. People closest to you are going to hurt your feelings, and give you unwanted advice. Head them off at the pass and tell them that you are on top of all the research and protocols (you need to be), that this is going to be stressful, that you are so grateful for their support, but that the things you can't have them do include _______. For me, it was advice on how to parent...like when my daughter would be defiant, or when I chose to keep her out of the public eye when her tics and chorea were severe. Doing that up front will save all of you a lot of misunderstandings down the road. The "Loving but Uninformed" in your life will give you some bizarre advice at times; take it in the spirit in which they meant it. At the same time, get soft. For me, this meant learning to accept help from other people. I have always prided myself in being able to be self-reliant, being able to do it all, but with this spectrum of disease - forget it. I have learned that letting people help is not a sign of weakness, but an acceptance of kindness that can really make a difference. The people around you who really care want to help. Let them. 
    10. Slow down the clock. You aren't going to get it all done. At times you are going to be late to school. Sometimes you won't get to a place at all. You might even miss a major life event like a close friend's wedding, or as it is in my case...your chid might even miss a year of school. It will work out.
    11. Read it all, get informed, stay on top of it...and then walk away at times. You cannot live and breathe this everyday without becoming obsessed in an unhealthy way. My daughter loathes it that I pick up on every tic, and my husband got tired of my talking through the study results in the third standard deviation for the sample size of 12 for the methylation of a certain gene expression (whoa, sexy AND romantic) when we crawled into bed at night. (The main reason I come and go from this website .) 
    12. Go out at a minimum of twice a month for the evening. The only rule: Thou shall not talk about thy child or thy child's disease. Also keep something out there a month or two away to look forward to...beach, trip to parents, buying a new sofa, camping trip. Finally, don't forget the healthy siblings and your SO. As much of a nut as I am about healthy eating, sometimes a little love and acknowledgement is as easy as a box of walnut brownies that can be mixed and tossed in the oven in two minutes...with a PostIt note alongside.  
    After two years of IVIG, Cellcept, Rixtuximab and Cytoxan, we are finally knocking down the world's most persistent immune system and our daughter is slowly getting better. Chorea is gone, tics gone, OCD gone, moods better, tremors gone, ataxia gone, mutism gone, catatonia gone, sleep patterns good, aversions gone, eating well, engaging with the family, smiling, laughing and has some quality of life. 
    Long story short: Treat physically and if a child like ours (who is probably one of a handful of the most profound expressions ever on this disease spectrum) can get fully back on the happy and healthy track - yours will too. 
     
  2. Like
    aba reacted to searching_for_help in Missing the Diagnosis: The Hidden Medical Causes of Mental Disorders   
    I think I've mentioned this link before. It's a continuing education course, and with this info out there, I don't understand why our kids don't get better care. Not so much that PANDAS is talked about, but that MANY "mental illnesses" are really caused by deficiencies, illnesses, etc. I thought it was fascinating.
     
    http://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course067.php
  3. Like
    aba got a reaction from valsmom in Mycoplasma IGM after treatment   
    2380 is still high and I wouldn't think it is wiped out. My dd's #'s are in the same range, and I think the dr. didn't even suggest re-testing the numbers that soon after initial treatment.
  4. Like
    aba got a reaction from valsmom in Mycoplasma antibodies question   
    How do you use the oils? In a carrier oil? Do you have a link for the fb page?
     
    Her symptoms have always been mainly rage (often diagnosed as ODD) and very bad sensory issues. All senses are heightened often to the point of pain for her.
  5. Like
    aba got a reaction from MomWithOCDSon in JCAP PANS articles free until 3/15/15   
    source: http://www.nepandasparents.com/resources/resourcelinks.html
     
    http://online.liebertpub.com/toc/cap/25/1
     
    quote:
     
    "The Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology (JCAP) special issue on pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) is now available to download for free until March 15, 2015. This is the first published collection of articles concerning PANS and PANDAS. After March 15, download will be available for purchase.

    The edition includes papers on use of Cefdinir, IVIG, Eating Disorders, IVIG, Plasma Apheresis, and more. These articles will help spread awareness on PANS itself as well as treatment options. Hopefully more data driven studies will be forthcoming."
  6. Like
    aba got a reaction from sss in Even the dog goes to hide during a rage...   
    I'm not in any way making light of the situation, because we have been in tears for much of the past few months as DD's symptoms seem to intensify. But it struck me as sickly humorous when I noticed that our dog will go hide when she gets really bad with the raging, screaming, etc... An ANIMAL even notices that this behavior is not normal and is scared of a little girl :( .
     
    Sometimes you laugh to keep from crying (and totally losing it!).... Anyone else have anecdotes that only parents here would understand??
  7. Like
    aba got a reaction from MissionMama in What does recovery look like?   
    Someone here mentioned that "we were never 100% normal..." or something like that. It seems as if there is a subset of children, due to genetics or whatever, that will be susceptible to things like PANDAS, PANS, autism, vaccine damage, aspergers, etc. DD was always high needs, a horrible sleeper, from day 1, had a bad reaction to her 8 week vax (which she appeared to recover from), and was always sensitive to light. But we still considered her within the boundaries of "normal" until that one day when she flipped. So, in essence, a perfect storm was brewing.
     
    So it seems that, for those kids, getting "recovered" may not ever mean that they are like that "perfectly" neurotypical child, but that they are back to the point where they were before they fell off the cliff, maybe more high needs and requiring more attention, but definitely manageable and not interfering with a "normal" life.
×