Jump to content
ACN Latitudes Forums

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/26/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Priscilla

    Possibly PANDAS?

    Funny I just got a notification from this response. I have not been on this forum in a very long time. I am so happy to report that I have a very healthy happy 16-year-old daughter who is no resemblance to the child that was in such turmoil. I will however say it has contributed to the person she is kind, compassionate and confident. I just went for an IEP meeting today which we did not even try Start one until eighth grade where things got worse before they got better but I have to say once over the hump of entering puberty things really started to balance out. She has not used one accommodation from her bare bones IEP she has good grades healthy social relationships and almost no residual OCD. I hope this gives hope to the parents that are going through this. My main advice and one of the hardest lessons I learned and she actually helped me see it was not turning her into something that needed to be fixed with all the desperation of trying to find her help she did feel like that for a time. Funny once I excepted exactly how she was whether it was going to last forever or not is when she started to get better. Sending love and good vibes to all of you and hope for a better day.
  2. 2 points
    bws1565

    Why not start antibiotics anyway

    Jumping in with a different perspective. Was your son vaccinated? Vaccine adjuvants are designed to cross the BBB, specifically aluminium. There was much discussion on this site that Pandas is a version of aluminum toxicity. With vaccines, the aluminum is designed to hold onto the antigen and keep it in the body long term; thereby introducing antigens into the brain as well. It is believed that detoxing from aluminum and mercury helps quiet the immune system. We have tried selenium for mercury, malic acid for aluminum and other stuff as well. She is probably not all clean, but definitely is aluminum sensitive- she cannot tolerate aluminum based deodorant. She is currently using Diatomaceous earth for a slow detox for everything. I think it is helping well. I have learnt about vaccine reactions about seven years ago, and have not vaccinated my kids since. I have 2 totally unvaccinated kids, and several partially vaccinated. It is a CRIME what pharma is doing to our kids without knowing the long term effects. I can honestly say, VACCINES ARE NOT WORTH IT! Which parent would not nurse a child through a bad case of pertussins or measles, and even sweat the time through the a hospitalization for physical problems versus dealing with what we are dealing with here?!!! Just venting my pain. I wish I would have known about this issue many many years ago.
  3. 2 points
    maryangela

    Adult PANDAS doctor in Chicago?

    Donald Raden, MD is an Integrative Psychiatrist in Highwood, IL. His practice is called the Raden Wellness Center. My son (age 13) has been under Dr. Raden’s care for 1 year. He saved my son’s life. He treats many young adults with PANDAS. My son’s case was severe.
  4. 2 points
    kos_mom

    Tonight's Chicago Med episode

    I contacted PANDAS Network right after the episode. This morning I received this response from Diana Pohlman: "We heard from lots of parents and 600 innundated the producers email. We are following up with an email to the producers as well. Happily 20-20 is doing a great story on REAL TREATMENT mid May and that will be on ABC." NBC is the producer for Chicago Med.
  5. 2 points
    MomWithOCDSon

    Help....when to be admitted?

    Oh my, I'm so sorry! Your son's description of how he's feeling reminds me vividly of Susannah Cahalan's description of her own auto-immune illness in "Brain on Fire." She, too, experienced paranoia and some other symptoms that many traditional doctors would all too readily dismiss as solely psychiatric manifestations, dispensing with the underlying physical issues. If your son is a danger to himself or to others, you will need to get him immediate help; if that means the hospital, then it's the hospital. Unfortunately, I think it likely that you should expect to be met with some psychiatric interventions -- tranquilizers, at a minimum -- if he presents as agitated or full-on delusional at admissions. You may have reached a crossroads where the abx are insufficient for meeting his illness adequately. Can you get a PANDAS/PANS specialist on board? I know a number of families here have allowed short-term and periodic use of anti-psychotics or tranquilizers (Valium, Seroquel, etc.), just to get there kids calm enough to travel for help, and/or to give the kid and the whole family a break and some sleep. I'm not advocating that, necessarily, but you have to do what works in order to give your kid their best chance at a route which leads to the best healing. Hang in there. Hopefully, someone else will chime in with more direct experience that may resonate with your situation.
  6. 2 points
    I am checking as the mom much farther down the road to be a help, if I can. My daughter was diagnosed in November 2012. This is our five year anniversary with this disease and there is HOPE for all of your kids. This is long but please read: With one of the most profound and difficult to treat cases to ever treat - my daughter is staring community college in the spring! You name the symptom and she has exhibited it - to name a few... complex tics, anorexia, bed wetting, mutism, depression, OCD, sleep disorders, a host of psychiatric symptoms (including schizoprhenic type symptoms including violence), and catatonia. She has also had every treatment - countless antibiotics, IVIVGs, rituximab, cell cept, prophylactic antibiotix, cytoxan, tociluzimab. We lost four years of life - she lost high school, and I shut down ever yaspect of life to take care of her. It has been lonely, frustrating, difficult, depressing...and yet hopeful, strengthening, funny, and finally TRIUMPHANT. I am repositing something a wrote in 2015 to give you all some encouragement and some general advice - especially to parents of children who are most severely affected. After I wrote this my daughter's trajectory slowed, but we found tociluzumab was the treatment that finally rounded out her recovery and though she still has some memory loss and is still making her way back academically. We know that she is going to have a NORMAL LIFE. Just a year ago, I thought she would always be with us, never have a job, never have friends...and now she is learning to drive and starting college classes (with a little support from special services) in a few weeks. Now she is running, swimming, laughing, talkative, and back to her old self - volunteering at a local library and worried about her hair and makeup (you have no idea what a big deal that is). Remember that every child presents differently and the part of the autoimmune system that is affected - and therefore the treatment that works - is different for each child. That said, PM me or ask me here and I will try to start checking in now that I too have my own life back. Hang in there....it will get better... Here is the 2015 post. My daughter has one of the most severe and drug-resistant cases of what falls under the big umbrella of a strep-induced autoimmune disorder that left her with severe neurological and significant joint involvement. For those who don't remember us, my daughter was an exceptional student and athlete, and world's happiest and easy child to raise - until the bottom fell out two years ago. In a matter of a days she suddenly and frighteningly developed Sydenham's chorea, tics, mutism, mood swings, joint pain and swelling. aversions, delusions, rage and host of other heart-breaking symptoms. It has been a tremendously challenging road and so as an unwilling seasoned veteran here is the advice I am giving to anyone who thinks their child has PANDAS, PANS, LYME or any other unusual/frustrating unnamed condition. 1. Do NOT waste time. The first time you see symptoms that do not clear up permanently after a round of antibiotics, get real help. Any of the symptoms I have described indicate your child has neurological inflammation. For the majority of kids, this could mean your child has cross-reacting antibodies, that are attacking your child's healthy tissues. For many kids this could involve brain, heart or joint problems so you absolutely need to rule out any potential damage, especially heart involvement (this was the one potential result our daughter had). The longer you go, the more damage that can result and the harder it will be to treat. This means: 2. Your child has a PHYSICAL disease with psychiatric symptoms resulting from inflammation so you need the right specialists. If your child has recurrent or ongoing flares after antibiotic treatment, and you are only seeing a psychiatrist or PANDAS doctor who has not done a full spectrum of physical diagnostics (MRI, heart ultrasound, tests for Lyme, allergies, inflammatory markers, titers, etc.) then ask your pediatrician for a pediatric neurologist referral. Remember this is PHYSICAL. I can't emphasize this enough: If you can, go see a neurologist and an immunologist. 3. It's not in a name, so don't get stuck with a label. I know we all want that relief/satisfaction of saying my child has "PANDAS" or some other condition, but that can predispose physicians to start treating before a real diagnosis and plan is put forth. For example, we ran off immediately to USF for PANDAS evaluation, at which they gave us some surveys, talked to us and then tossed us some antibiotics with a diagnosis of PANDAS. Not one physical diagnostic test was done and we were foolish to go along with that. In time, they would have ramped up to IVIG, etc....but I would never have known that my daughter could have had heart damage. For those wanting a name., honestly, ( For the math-minded I think we are talking about a spectrum of autoimmune diseases that could be plotted on a coordinate plane of X and symptoms on Y, to find that our kids are scattered all over the place) I think there are as many names for these diseases as there are kids. Just call it, "Insert your child's name here" disease. I am kidding - but also not. The many presentations of these diseases explain why they sound akin to others (like Lupus) and yet different when we talk to each other here. Also, never mention diagnosis to insurance providers. Many are looking for reasons to reject claims so let your doctors and insurance companies play the coding game. 4. Take meticulous notes regarding symptoms.Take pictures and video even at bad times. Trust me, you will forget. Look for subtle things like handwriting and appetite changes, sleeping changes, expression of unusual ideas, reduced speech. When first met our neurologist, I came in not with a disease name but a table of symptoms, date of onset, severity and frequency. I wanted them to diagnose without predisposition. 5. Don't worry about the bandaids - yet. I know a lot of us sweat everything from glutens, to certain amino acids to micronutrients. Until you rule out allergies, known genetic deficiencies....don't lie awake at night and wonder whether or not you are missing some esoteric piece of the puzzle. Feed your child well, make sure they are getting plenty of vitamin D (low is usually indicative of a chronic inflammatory process), and as many nutrients as they can from real food. You are a good parent, and while the little things will help along with a healthy lifestyle, there is no magic pill. Proper diagnostics will eliminate a lot of concern about allergies and root causes so you don't waste a fortune in time and money trying this and that. We are desperate and vulnerable so read everything with a critical eye. 6. Trust your gut and assert yourself. I went to FOUR doctors and had three ER visits with my daughter, shaking my head and respectfully telling them we were moving on when they told me she was probably just depressed. WRONG. (Tangents: I think our world, present and past is full of kids who are under-diagnosed for physical problems, and there is NO difference between mental health and health. It's just health). 7. Your child is not your child. There is no way that sweet baby of yours would ever do the things he/she is doing if he/she was healthy. Easier said than done - but do not take it personally. That said, reasonable consequences apply. If your child is having severe outbursts, you have to remind yourself: THIS IS THE DISEASE. Say it like a mantra if you have to. 8. Get healthy and fit. I have had to care for my daughter for two years 24/7. Most of you will not be like that. It's going to try your body, mind and spirit. It's going to be hard so you need to be battle prepared. At times, you are going to be scared, angry, tired, frustrated and lonely so you are going to need to be at your best like no other time in your life. Get sleep and don't worry if there are fingerprints on the appliances and the car needs vacuuming. My family has learned that no matter what, I am taking an hour a day to run or surf. 9. Get brave and tough.. People closest to you are going to hurt your feelings, and give you unwanted advice. Head them off at the pass and tell them that you are on top of all the research and protocols (you need to be), that this is going to be stressful, that you are so grateful for their support, but that the things you can't have them do include _______. For me, it was advice on how to parent...like when my daughter would be defiant, or when I chose to keep her out of the public eye when her tics and chorea were severe. Doing that up front will save all of you a lot of misunderstandings down the road. The "Loving but Uninformed" in your life will give you some bizarre advice at times; take it in the spirit in which they meant it. At the same time, get soft. For me, this meant learning to accept help from other people. I have always prided myself in being able to be self-reliant, being able to do it all, but with this spectrum of disease - forget it. I have learned that letting people help is not a sign of weakness, but an acceptance of kindness that can really make a difference. The people around you who really care want to help. Let them. 10. Slow down the clock. You aren't going to get it all done. At times you are going to be late to school. Sometimes you won't get to a place at all. You might even miss a major life event like a close friend's wedding, or as it is in my case...your chid might even miss a year of school. It will work out. 11. Read it all, get informed, stay on top of it...and then walk away at times. You cannot live and breathe this everyday without becoming obsessed in an unhealthy way. My daughter loathes it that I pick up on every tic, and my husband got tired of my talking through the study results in the third standard deviation for the sample size of 12 for the methylation of a certain gene expression (whoa, sexy AND romantic) when we crawled into bed at night. (The main reason I come and go from this website .) 12. Go out at a minimum of twice a month for the evening. The only rule: Thou shall not talk about thy child or thy child's disease. Also keep something out there a month or two away to look forward to...beach, trip to parents, buying a new sofa, camping trip. Finally, don't forget the healthy siblings and your SO. As much of a nut as I am about healthy eating, sometimes a little love and acknowledgement is as easy as a box of walnut brownies that can be mixed and tossed in the oven in two minutes...with a PostIt note alongside. After two years of IVIG, Cellcept, Rixtuximab and Cytoxan, we are finally knocking down the world's most persistent immune system and our daughter is slowly getting better. Chorea is gone, tics gone, OCD gone, moods better, tremors gone, ataxia gone, mutism gone, catatonia gone, sleep patterns good, aversions gone, eating well, engaging with the family, smiling, laughing and has some quality of life. Long story short: Treat physically and if a child like ours (who is probably one of a handful of the most profound expressions ever on this disease spectrum) can get fully back on the happy and healthy track - yours will too.
  7. 2 points
    Fiddlegrl -- Welcome to the forum, though I'm sorry for all you've been through and the issues you're still fighting. I will say that I've been with this forum for many years now...first during my DS's illness and healing, and then somewhat less frequently for the last few years, checking in to follow up on old friends and any new research, and to chime in when something resonates with my experience. Pretty much ALL of the symptoms you've described, unfortunately, have been discussed here as part of the PANs/PANDAs continuum. It stinks. I don't have any practical experience with respect to Lyme and its co-infections; my DS's syndrome was clearly strep-related, though seasonal allergies exacerbated inflammation and the immune response for a number of years, once the PANDAs had kicked into high gear. Like you, though, we believe his behavioral issues were tied to atypical strep infections potentially as young as 3 years of age, though certainly by the age of 6 when he was officially given an OCD diagnosis. But he never tested positive (via swab and culture) for strep at the time, and no local doctors would give us the time of day regarding PANDAs then, either, so he went without any real treatment until he hit 12. That's when the PANDAs brought him to an absolutely non-functional state, the research coming out of NIMH, Columbia and Dr. Cunningham had progressed, and we were finally able to talk someone into an antibiotic trial. It was a long road, but the rest, as they say, is now thankfully pretty much history. As a result of our experience, though, I do think it likely that PANDAS/PANs sufferers who are at a more advanced age before receiving immune and/or anti-inflammatory therapies may have a harder road with respect to healing and "bouncing back;" not sure if that's because the brain "wiring" has matured more in the interim, or if the chronic inflammatory and auto-immune responses in the body are somehow more entrenched and therefore harder to reverse. In the end, it took my DS about 5 years in total to return to pretty much full functionality, and that was with auto-immune, therapeutic and psychiatric interventions all thrown into the mix. He continues to contend with some OCD and situational anxiety now and again, and I'm not convinced that this will ever disappear completely. But those issues remain at manageable levels (knock on wood), and he's happy and healthy and constructive and functional. Pretty much all we could ask for, after what he went through. I'm not sure how to advise you on any possible next steps, really, except to suggest that perhaps exploring some additional genetic markers and methylation issues might help you for the long term? You mentioned genetic testing for porphyria, but did you get a full work-up? A search here on the forum for "methylation" and "mutations" will lead you to multiple discussions regarding the methylation cycle and how genetic testing has helped point some families to a regimen of supplements and/or medications that proved to be more effective for them in light of various mutations and genetic predispositions. Perhaps that's worth a try? Finding a well-versed LLMD and/or integrative physician who could be your partner in working through these issues would be a bonus. Your post was very well-written, so I'm picturing an intelligent, capable and fairly "together" young woman, so I sincerely hope you're finding moments of joy and contentment in your everyday life, despite this tremendous burden. All the best to you!
  8. 1 point
    I think it depends on your age. I have had two episodes of PANDAS in my life. First was when I was 11 years old. Sudden vocal repetitions of phrases when spoken to and lots of hand washing OCD. I was a happy, not anxious, middle schooler and I felt mostly normal - I just had these vocal tics and OCD. I went to school but made accommodations with my teachers not to call on me in class and my parents explained to my friends what was going on. This went away slowly with 6 months of antibiotics and I was in remission for 10 years. I went on to be a recruited division 1 athlete at a top 5 university and was happy, popular, and felt like the luckiest person in the world. I thought I was done with PANDAS. Now I am in my early 20s and battling a much stronger PANDAS/PANS relapse. I have no tics or OCD at all just debilitating social anxiety, depression and obsessive thoughts/worries (which are actually considered a form of OCD) that came out of nowhere three years ago and slowly built up in intensity until I had to leave college. This time around has been more challenging as Lyme and co-infections are involved and I haven't gotten better yet after a year of antibiotics. I think older PANDAS patients experience more amygdala-based inflammation (mood/anxiety issues) whereas kids experience more basal ganglia-based inflammation (tics/OCD). Just my two cents.
  9. 1 point
    Chemar

    Possible PANS/PANDAS or Tourette's

    Hi there I just wanted to welcome you to the forum tho sorry for your child's struggles. Hopefully parents more knowledgeable than me re PANS/PANDAS will soon reply, but my understanding is that Tourette Syndrome and PANDAS are not mutually exclusive, and that yes, some kids are dx TS when in fact it is PANS
  10. 1 point
    mmw

    Does PANDAS always have OCD and tics?

    When my son was young we thought he was very sensitive and had a difficult temperament. He eventually did get tics, hallucinations, you name it every time he had strep but before that he was just a VERY difficult child when it turned out he had strep. Like having to be physically pulled out of the car at preschool. He never quite seemed to know how to act either- lots of social issues. We treated with abx for years and did Brain Balance and all of his aspie symptoms went away. When he did have an episode of rage it turned out his younger sister had a simmering strep infection. He is now 18, totally healed, sweetest and the most laid back guy you would ever hope to meet. It was the PANDAS. It is gone .
  11. 1 point
    mdl

    Does PANDAS always have OCD and tics?

    For a long time we thought that our daughter had one of the rare cases of PANS without OCD until we figured out that her OCD just didn't look like the typical manifestations of OCD. Sometimes she would get stuck on something and not be able to let it go or she would be very negative about everything. She was actually having obsessive thoughts that fit an OCD pattern, but there usually were no particular compulsions that went with the obsessive thoughts. Later we also realized that there were obsessive thoughts underlying some of her behaviors and she just never articulated those thoughts. No one knew what was going on in her mind except her. Now that she's a bit older we have lots of conversations about what constitutes a normal worry and what is an obsessive thought and we have a window into her mind that has helped us to help her. I think it's also has been a relief to her. For a long time I read list after list of OCD symptoms in kids and nothing seemed to fit. I don't know if this is common for PANS/PANDAS kids, but her OCD didn't fit anything I read. She's doing much better now, but has some lingering symptoms that come and go, and it's only been more recently that we've seen some more straightforward OCD symptoms.
  12. 1 point
    When I was young, I used to take apart old computers, turn them on, and then watch what happened as I took my ground probe and touched different circuits. I could get all sorts of colorful patterns on the screen, but oddly, never the same pattern twice. I think PANDAS is a little like that. The immune system goes crazy and generally in a predictable way. But it's also different with everyone and even within the same person, it changes. I know my daughter has pandas, but right now, I wouldn't say that she is really OCD. She has been really bad in the past, but right now, it doesn't hamper us too much. To me, most mental issues come down to identity. If something in my daughter's day implies that she is stupid or fat, she gets super distressed, even suicidal, filled with rage, and then depression. This is tricky because kids aren't dumb. If you do too much for them, they think they are stupid and that can trigger a downward spiral. But, if you don't do enough, or imply that they need to do more, it can trigger that they are not loved, and BOOM. I think, because of the increased sensitivity because of the over-active brains stuff, destructive mental loops can be very harsh on these kids. I try to set rules that are "necessary" and be pretty lax on other stuff. My daughter likes to change clothes 10x a day, then complain there isn't anything to wear. Convincing she that wearing something twice, if worn for a short time is OK, has been tough, but laundry is once a week. She has to work within that. She doesn't like it, but she doesn't freak out anymore. I don't lie to my kid, but I think of things to say that can build her self esteem back up. Getting her to realize that she WILL get her feelings hurt and need to continue on has been tough. Just today, some off handed put down from her cyber school teacher had her in a tizzy for 15 minutes. But, it was only 15 minutes and not 6 hours (or even days) like it has been in the past. Suicidal feelings are actually confused survival instincts. When the consciousness feels like it has changed too much from what it was, or has been rejected by those it loves, it wants to hit the reset button, (assuming its self immortal (which is another discussion.)) So, the suicidal expressions can really require some quick reassurances that you still love them and even if this stuff is really crazy, you will always love them. It can seem like you are carrying a lot of their personal responsibility for self preservation, but having gone through this, that is something that you can teach later.
  13. 1 point
    jsl25

    Does PANDAS always have OCD and tics?

    Some of the things you listed at the bottom of the post could be considered OCD. For example, my daughter’s OCD is around clothes and how things “feel”.
  14. 1 point
    I committed to feed results back as they trickle in, so here is one such result: For MTHFR A1298C (rs1801131), there were 70 sets of data: - 5 were homo for the risk allele (i.e., +/+) - 23 were heterzygous (+/-) - 42 of them did not have the risk allele at all (-/-) For MTHFR C677T (rs1801133), there were 71 sets of data: - 5 were homo for the risk allele (i.e., +/+) - 26 were heterzygous (+/-) - 40 of them did not have the risk allele at all (-/-) The first result above is a lower count of risk allele than the general population, and the 2nd is a little higher - but neither statistically significantly so, according to how we setup this analysis. Particularly together, the two of them are pretty much like the general population in terms of number of the risk alleles. I hope this result is not upsetting for any that feel these MTHFR SNPs are a significant player in PANS. Because it doesn't correlate wtih PANS doesn't mean that it isn't something of significance for your particular child. So far, we have only tabulated results like the above (how individual SNPs for these PANS kids fare against the general population). We are still wanting to look at other patterns of many SNPs together among the participants, which might show something statistically significant even if an individual SNP doesn't. It can also be the case that for a given individual, a certain combination of SNPs, including these MTHFR ones, work in a way together to affect the disorder. It is really hard to do either of those kinds of analysis with our genetic data though, so we'll see how our investigations of that works out.
  15. 1 point
    We have not gone through similar, so can't comment too directly, only on your statement "...apparently in true PANDAS cases it [OCD] accelerates anxiety and vice-versa?" Well, I would say that OCD, if it starts more slowly in a PANS/PANDAS child, is somewhat calming at first, when it is not otherwise debilitating or noticed by others too much, because there is some satisfaction derived from "repeating it right" when they finally get there. But when it grows much more significant later (or for any person with severe OCD) the sufferer fairly quickly becomes exasperated with how debilitating it is, and sometimes satisfaction is eluded, and so of course that creates plenty of anxiety. So I think your statement is fully true for those with very quick onset of PANS/PANDAS, and eventually true for all. If you can get and afford the ivig, the potential benefits probably outweigh the risks (in my mind).
  16. 1 point
    tj21

    LD vs HD IVIG

    Thanks, @maryangela . Just spoke w/DS18's PANS provider. Confirmed that b/c he was sick going into this latest HD IVIg, it will take longer for everything to calm down. We'll be doing HD every 3 months through November 2019. Good to hear about your DS13. We were also 80-90% improved January-March. Trying to get this current infection under control now.
  17. 1 point
    MomWithOCDSon

    Disrespectful behavior

    I like "The Explosive Child," also, and while it's not specific to PANDAS, necessarily, one of the authors has worked with Dr. Swedo in her research at NIMH, so he's at least familiar with PANDAS presentations. I'm not sure it matters whether the disrespectful behavior is uncontrollable because of PANDAS, or if it's uncontrollable because your kid is so far out of his self-control that he can't stop himself from blurting out rude words or making rude gestures or whatever. I mean, yes, PANDAS can definitely mess with your executive functioning and make it more difficult to display age-appropriate behaviors. But most behavior of that kind comes from a lack of self-control, irrespective of the genesis of the lack of control. Either his brain is physically impacted so he acts out, or his "mind" is emotionally impacted so he acts out, the results are the same. And maybe the same tactics are applicable for the behaviors, as well. "The Explosive Child" has some great strategies you could try, but as I recall, pretty much all of them suggest that you de-escalate any unpleasant exchanges by dis-engaging, taking a few minutes to calm down and dial everything back, and then re-engaging again in a calm, controlled tone of voice and body language to resolve the dispute. Seems to me that could work whether PANDAS or non-PANDAS. I personally think that pretty much ALL non-age-appropriate behaviors (meltdowns, tantrums, etc.) our kids may display during this illness is at least partially -- if not wholly -- attributable to the illness. But then again most "normal" kids will test their limits during the natural course of growing up, too. So, in your shoes, I might ask myself, "Is this behavior I could expect to see out of a 'normal' XX year old?" If the answer is "yes," then maybe you deal with it as you would with any kid behaving that way. But if the answer is "no," I think you still address it, but maybe with a little extra compassion and patience, adding into the discussion something along the lines of, "I know that you're feeling especially out of sorts right now while we get the inflammation in your brain and the other PANDAS stuff under control, but you have to know that speaking/acting that way is still unacceptable. Let's try and brainstorm some things you could try instead of yelling at me/your dad next time you feel this way." My son hated being told he was not acting his age when he'd meltdown over something pretty minor or lose his patience in 0.2 seconds during his PANDAS. But I've got to be honest; I didn't do it to be cruel, but I felt like it was somewhat important that I hold a mirror up for him because I didn't want him to dig a deeper and deeper hole for himself socially. I wanted him to have some outside perspective as to how his meltdowns looked to his peers in the hopes that it would give him some incentive to work with me on some of the "Explosive Child" strategies for dialing things down so that he could "save himself" in some of those outside world situations. It was tough, and we weren't always successful. But I do think it helped him maintain some perspective, especially when he got out of that intense moment and could look at things a little less emotionally. All the best to you!
  18. 1 point
    maryangela

    Disrespectful behavior

    I recommend the book, “The Explosive Child”. It’s not PANDAS specific, but it definitely can apply.
  19. 1 point
    I'm a little late but have to respond because our symptoms change meant that we - who were experienced with PANDAS - completely missed the "after puberty relapse" for 2 years. Our son was diagnosed in 2010 or 11 at age 11. We, the parents found this and worked to show and educate his pediatrician about PANDAS. The symptoms at 11 years old were obvious - vocal and facial tics, tapping and counting, repetitive phrases and eventually only those phrases. But he was a happy ticcer. CBT did nothing as they said he was not anxious or depressed, but he had to do things his brain told him to do. We had this thing "licked" after a year of high dose abx. Flash forward to Spring and summer 2016 - my kid after sophomore year of college - top 5 school, national athlete - suddenly is so anxious he can't interact with high school students at a summer camp. He feels everyone is "putting him down" or "out to get him". Every interaction is stressful and eventually he would not leave the house. His personality changed 100%. He alternated between despair and optimism but often felt completely apathetic. He begged for help, kept saying "something is wrong - this is not normal" but to us the signs were invisible - no tics, no repetitions, nothing you could see. He talked to a counselor (no value). We never, ever thought PANDAS. There was no similarity to his previous diagnosis. However, his mental anguish was horrible and waxed and waned over the next two years until finally last June, after a case of strep that went untreated because he did not have a fever and was refused a swap test, he completely fell apart with intrusive thoughts and irrational behavior. Suddenly his dad said "this is completely irrational - it must be PANDAS" The ASo titers came back at 932, Cunningham Panel (now existed) was 3/5 positive. I'm telling you we had not forgotten about PANDAS but the second time looked so completely different we, who were looking, completely missed it. We're on it now but feel like he has suffered two extra years and we hope we are not too late.
  20. 1 point
    maryangela

    Extreme behavior

    Wombat140– I am new to this forum, but have read a few of your posts. Your suffering reminds me of my son’s suffering. My son is rarely open to talking about his compulsions, but after dealing with his OCD for years, I’ve determined that all of his rages were due to his OCD being “blown”. Telling him to quiet down only makes the situation worse. The consequence does not matter, even if it involves a neighbor calling the police. Part of my son’s OCD was that he would need me or my husband to do something, but his OCD would not allow him to tell us what it was. For example, when triggered, he would need to change his clothes, then leave our apartment building. I would need to hold the door open in a certain way, but he couldn’t tell me how. He would change his clothes and go in and out of the building hundreds of times a day. One night he repeated this compulsion continously from 7 pm until 7am. He would change his clothes and I would walk around the block with him. It didn’t matter that it was in the middle of winter. I truly didn’t think we would live through this. My son will tell me that he is not being manipulative. The way I see it is that his OCD is manipulating him, which sometimes involves needing others to behave a certain way. He is not choosing to have these thoughts. My son is 80-90% better, since IVIG treatments, which started this past November. I hope you find relief soon.
  21. 1 point
    I have found it profoundly enlightening to read about some of the obsessions and what parents thought were associated to them. I know some of these things are pretty personal, but finding patterns and possible solutions can be very helpful. So, my DD is 10. She was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder when she was about 3. My daughter was adopted at birth from my niece. We believe she was exposed to several drugs during pregnancy, and the father was a heavy user. She is "normal" from all first impressions, but she was obsessive about intense events. Like she might get hit by another child and she would not let it go for months. Then it was things like "a child threw up on the rug" and she would never sit on the rug again. But basically, it was very manageable and I that concerned. We had therapists for her for anything we thought she needed. She did seem to get sick easily. And she got strep, and pneumonia, even the H1N1 (we think all did) she started getting a little worst. She also have a couple of stays in the hospital for UTI's and blockages. She was diagnosed with gastro-paresis was one low doses of amoxicillin for motility from a very young age. Eventually that stopped working. So we went to an antihistamine called cyproheptadine. She is still on it. She has been on antibiotics several times, for ear infections, pneumonia, etc. She had blood work a couple of times and developed a phobia of needles. I had major heart surgery she was about 5 and that might have affected her. With the last time we needed blood work, she had a major panic attack, hyperventilating, etc. Mostly, her major obsession was with getting a fever. She needed me to check her forehead at least 2-4 times an hour, all day, every day. Then it was fear that she would throw up. Every 15 minutes she would say she was going to throw up. She got sick at Applebees about 3 years ago and everyday something reminded her that event. She didn't want to go out to eat because it reminded to her of that. Needless to say, we never went back to Applebees. Going from appointment to another would trigger major anxiety, but once there, she was fine. I started her on a powder probiotic, 5 billion, called Culturelle, about 3 weeks ago. She started having better days, but also somethings got worst. She seemed to get more fearful of others and their germs, but less about her forehead. But, she started playing for friends again. I started her on Renewed Life 30 billion, and her anxiety seemed to almost go away. But her ability to process her frustration also disappeared. One night she physically violent with us, the next day she attacked another student (her niece) in school for not getting out a seat she wanted. My Pro-Kids (Pro- 15) got here the next day and I stopped the Renewed Life and gave her the new Pro-Kids. Everything seemed to just settle and calm. She had a wonderful day. She went to her gymnastic lesson without complaint, she played with her niece, (got annoyed but worked through it) and went to the store with us without complaining. She kept saying how good she felt, her stomach didn't hurt. I began to question about things like, "did she feel spoiled" (a common one), did she feel anxious, (very common), was anything reminding her of Applebees, (very common) and she answered "no" to all it. She checked her forehead once today. Even though I'm pretty excited, I know this stuff is never really over. But, the idea that there is hope is strong with me.
  22. 1 point
    Annieo

    Paleo vs. Ketogenic

    I started eating a paleo diet about five years ago. It is a commitment in that you can't rely on easy, processed foods. Last summer I started eating a ketogenic diet. Both are do-able. The benefit for me is that aches and pains I've had my entire life are gone. The sinus headaches I suffered from almost daily are gone. In other words, the inflammation I experienced for years is gone. I have not tried the diet with my PANDAS child, but because of the way I eat, she eats far more healthfully than most of her peers. Her PANDAS symptoms are currently mild, although I honestly have no idea why. It's probably easier to try a paleo diet at first, and then if you want you can move to ketogenic.
  23. 1 point
    lordchallen

    Extreme behavior

    Maryangela I had my daughter on the "Renewed Life" (I think) and I noticed a couple of interesting things. Like her anxiety seemed to almost disappeared (compared her usual) and I was really excited. I was calling it her "rage" but I could tell it was her inability to cope with frustration. Like I told her "put it away" and she got mad. Then her older sister came and lectured her (I had left) and she got even more mad. All of this followed the school nurse grilling and interrogating her in the hallway. She couldn't process the frustration. She has had a "sensory processing disorder" diagnosis since she was 2. We are constantly trying to help her process things. This might be talking, tossing things, squeezing things, pro-prescriptive exercises, reflexology, etc. She is a good kid. She is very loving, kind, thoughtful, blah, blah, blah. But there times when she gets really mean, but then she feels really bad afterwards. But this last week, I totally see where a stomach imbalance can cause inappropriate behavior. MomWithOCDSon, Thank you so much for all of your insight. I have tried a couple of different probiotics. I am using the Pro-Kids (Pro-15) and she seems like a million bucks. They seemed to work almost instantly. She said she loves her probiotics, she hasn't had stomachache in 2 days. She is good. She is a little moody, but after everything that has happened I find it very acceptable. But not crazy. If she gets upsets with a friends, she just walks away and does something else. I am very excited, I just hope things continue in this trend. Thanks for everything and I will be around for more insight.
  24. 1 point
    maryangela

    Extreme behavior

    I found the book, “The Explosive Child” extremely helpful. I would recommend that both you and your wife read it. It discusses collaborative problem solving, but also that sometimes “giving in” to the child is the best option at the moment. It is not worth the child or someone else getting hurt. Unrelated to the book, my son has an OCD issue about being told “no”. He explains that is has nothing to do with getting his way. I think when he asks for something and he’s told “no”, it makes him feel “bad” or “greedy”. I need to be careful how I word my response. For example if he asks for ice cream before bed, instead of saying, “You’ve had enough ice cream today and it’s too close to bedtime”, I would say, “You may have ice cream after lunch tomorrow”. It took me years to figure out that most of his rages were due to someone interfering with a compulsion.
  25. 1 point
    JenniferG

    LD vs HD IVIG

    Unfortunately, my provider will only prescribe to the a certain infusion company. (He owns it). Not my preferred scenario, but kids are healing.
  26. 1 point
    bobh

    GF diet helped, but then stopped. Input?

    That low-grade fever and red throat seems like a clue that what he could be fighting caused the flare - if the timing makes sense. A couple of days (and possibly longer) before those fever/throat symptoms could still explain a flare then.
  27. 1 point
    bobh

    GF diet helped, but then stopped. Input?

    I am so sorry that you had not received a response to this question. I myself didn't happen to notice it over the last week even though I am on briefly a few times a week. Has he changed over this past week? My first thought is that perhaps he has another trigger that he was exposed to at just the right time. How far-fetched that theory is depends on how long you left him on the "re-introduce gluten as a test" before you took him off it the 2nd time. If that was only for a day or two, it almost seems like too much of a co-incidence. It would still be possible, but it is a wild enough co-incidence to put doubt in my mind. Then the other possibility I draw from my pharmacist sister, who says that she often has patients that try a drug (we were talking about SSRI's at the time, so I am not sure how broadly this brush paints), get good improvement from it, then after some time (months, I think), get tired of its side effects and go off for a while. Then, when they want to try it again because of the symptoms, they find it doesn't have the same effect as it did the first time. This is common enough that she hears about it regularly. Who can understand the mechanisms involved in that? If a food has an effect on neurological/mental illness symptoms, then can it act similarly to a drug that has a neuro effect? It seems plausible to me, but like I say, who can explain the details of that kind of interaction? This theory offers no obvious next step.
  28. 1 point
    I wonder whether one of the docs could consult Dr. Najjar to rule that set of concerns out. When he spoke at the beginning of the month at the Common Threads conference it was clear that ultimately, like pans, pandas some cases of encephalitis are ultimately clinical diagnoses like PANS/PANDAS. He explained that in a not insignificant number of cases, antibodies don't get elevated and one must take the entire clinical picture into account. I am wishing you all the best.
  29. 1 point
    Where are you? What hospital is your daughter currently in? Any more new with respect to test results? Did these symptoms come on suddenly? Is your daughter otherwise neurotypical, or has she previously presented with autism or another neural disorder or "difference"? Yes, these symptoms are ones that can show up in severe episodes of auto-immune disorders, but not every medical professional is going to recognize the signs for what they are. When you had blood tests, what tests were included? You mention having an "immunity test." Via blood panels? What testing is included there? Make sure you're testing for ASO and anti-d-nase b (strep antibodies). Catatonia (even narcolepsy) has been associated with untreated strep infections, and many people are classically asymptomatic for strep -- no fever or sore throat, but raging antibody levels nonetheless. If you're spending time in the hospital, waiting, you might try getting a copy (it's available in digital format as well as paper) of a memoir by Susannah Cahalan called "Brain on Fire." Susannah suddenly developed all sorts of bizarre neuro symptoms, some of which your daughter is also displaying. She was studied and poked and prodded and tested, and they couldn't find the culprit; a set of doctors decided that she had a multitude of illnesses, both physical (seizure disorder) and mental (psychosis), but then one out-of-the-box thinking doctor noticed a few atypical behaviors and kept studying her and ultimately determined that she had developed some auto-immune reaction to some unknown microbe. It's been a while since I read the book, but I don't think they ever found out definitively what it was. I believe Susannah was treated with multiple interventions, but infusions were definitely in the mix, and she recovered. She was in New York, and the doctor who essentially saved her was Dr. Souhel Najjar.
  30. 1 point
    Sheila

    Our Journey

    bernerchiro, this is encouraging! Thanks for the detailed report. I can imagine that a monster truck show would be very stimulating. Please do keep us posted on the nutritionist and anything else that come up.
  31. 1 point
    bobh

    New member and mystery illness

    You did mention your moldy house. You can also search here for mold and find a lot of discussion - it is a recognized environmental trigger at pandasnetwork.org, which is a rich source of info in case you are not aware of it. Do you have any option even just to try a different location for a week or two, to see if there is a difference (including when you come back)? I would tend to believe that, with a lot of patience, you could find something that would help your symptoms, possibly only somewhat like Xifaxan has, but perhaps much better. It would take work and energy that you may not have. So, lean on us here, ask questions. This forum is not as fast-paced as most facebook groups, but there is to be a wealth of experience here.
  32. 1 point
    puzzledguy

    New Blog!

    I've just started this blog. Feel free to follow it, and please pass it on to your adult children with PANS/PANDAS/Lyme! https://twiceapart.wordpress.com/
  33. 1 point
    Sheila

    will these tics ever go away?

    Hi mlee, and welcome to the forums. I'm sorry that your son has been having some tics. Seeking help from a good naturopathic doctor is a great step to take. I hope you will let us know what foods come up as problematic. That should give you some good direction. You can also ask this person for suggestions on nutrient supplements. Charting is also a terrific step, though I know it can seem overwhelming, as you say. It will get easier with time. Keep it up--but also, only take on as much as you can without stressing yourself too much. If your son has a problem with gluten-- and not everyone with tics does -- it can take some time for improvement to be seen. I would give it a couple of weeks, and even then do not expect a dramatic change immediately as it can be a gradual change, and there may be other issues going on as well. Our organization has a new book out on tracking down triggers for tics. You might find it useful. Also, I think it would encourage you, because you asked if people are able to get the tics under control, and yes, many do and some of their accounts are in this book. But it can take a comprehensive effort, not just one or two things that usually bring about all the change. Have you already had a chance to make other changes in the diet like avoiding artificial colors, flavors and preservatives in food and drink? What we have found is that a three-pronged approach can often help: 1) dietary change, 2) avoiding allergens (is your child or immediate family allergic?) and 3) avoiding toxic products typically used in the home like bleach, scented products, pesticides. In addition to the above, you want to be sure there is not an underlying infection. Please get back to us and let us know a little more and also what the naturopath suggests about the food testing. And you should definitely have hope! You have already taken some very positive steps.
  34. 1 point
    There are a few things to consider in this situation. First, how much GABA is he getting and when do you give it to him? Is he also on Theanine (it helps produce GABA)? Too much GABA can actually be converted back to glutamate, increasing that fight or flight response. You would see a jumpier, more anxious and fearful child in that case. You can try giving him GABA just once after dinner (and not in the morning). Second, are you doing anything to help him detox and excrete what the antibiotics are killing? If not, he likely needs kidney and liver support to start and perhaps something to help detox the brain. We use a homeopathic called Drainage Tone for brain detox. It really helps. We get it from our chiropractor or our doctor. Finally, when you start killing bacteria with the antibiotics, often yeast is released too (it hides in the cells with the bacteria and viruses). So, look for signs of a yeast flare. Perhaps treat with an anti-fungal like Nystatin or Lauricidin. Makes sure he drinks lots of water, give him epsom salt baths to help with detox, and, if you have access, a dry sauna. Hope some of these suggestions help.
  35. 1 point
    bobh

    Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy?

    Ok, here is a spreadsheet attached that includes a brief description of the tonsillectomy experience, and then a link (all but 3 to a thread here at ACN Latitudes) if you want to read more. (The hardest part of this was actually weeding out duplicate responses in different threads). tonsillectomy_results.xls
  36. 1 point
    MomWithOCDSon

    Sensory Processing or PANDAs?

    Kelly -- I suspect it is a combination of both...an unfortunate marriage of a genetic susceptibility and the PANDAS-related inflammatory response. And it may not be a "flare" so much as a continuation of the original PANDAs/PANS immune onslaught; many of us find that a "typical" or shorter course of antibiotics is insufficient for fully addressing our kids' conditions, so a two-week course may not have fully addressed the "animal" that is PANDAS/PANs. Our DS, too, had some mild sensory issues prior to a the full-blown PANDAs episode that sent us into a tailspin. Once the PANDAs hit full force, we had him professionally evaluated and as with most of his behavior set, the results came back "borderline." During PANDAs, he was alternately identified as "borderline" a number of things: OCD, Asperger's, PDD-NOS, Sensory Processing Disorder. You name it, the poor kid, at one point in time or another, wore a label for it. What I can tell you is that, with the conclusion of effective PANDAs treatment, the sensory and social issues resolved 100%. One doctor even took steps to revise his file to remove the former ASD notation he'd made there. I would say, however, that I don't think you are wasting any effort in giving her access to OT; I think it will only help her as she heals and enforce positive behaviors and coping strategies that will stand her in good stead going forward. All the best!
  37. 1 point
    MomWithOCDSon

    Antibiotics during flare question

    There are studies that speak to other properties of various antibiotics. For instance, beta-lactam antibiotics are thought to have glutamate-modulating properties, and another class (cephalasporins, maybe? my memory isn't what it used to be) are anti-inflammatory. And if your kid is taking Augmentin, for instance, that clavulanic acid component (Augmentin being amoxicillin plus clauvanate) is thought to have some neuro-protective characteristics of its own. There are multiple, older threads here about various antibiotic characteristics, and a Google search will give you some answers, too.
  38. 1 point
    Joyle

    Where to find Clerodendrum Inerme extract?

    Hi everyone, Yes, the plant Clerodendrum inerme does work to reduce tics and other comorbids very effectively. We have discovered it doesn't work for everyone but it has helped many. The Facebook group is called Natural Care for Tics and Tourettes. There are lengthy discussions there about this plant which we have nicknamed cleo. It can be taken as a green juice or in capsules after dehydrating and powdering the leaves or as a tincture or as a homeopathic remedy. The only restriction is you will need to source the plant and grow it in a pot or your own backyard. The safety profile of the plant is exemplary. Please also do your own research to satisfy yourselves .... there is a wealth of information about Clerodendrum inerme on the Internet. Kind regards, Joy
  39. 1 point
    My 10 yr old son was diagnosed with PANS by an integrative medicine doctor by the name of Mae Kinaly in Irivine, CA. We live in Manhattan Beach in LA county. She did a ton of blood work, in depth history and immediately started him on azithromycin and supplements. She is a little kooky but I feel is a very in depth doctor with my son's best interests at heart. She does offer IVIG. We also went to Dr. Miroslav Kovacevic in Chiago for a second opinion and ultimately IVIG. Hope that helps.
  40. 1 point
    We also had very severe separation anxiety as the first symptom. Then we got many others (physical as well as behavioral/psychological). During the first 2-3 months, while DS (age 10) was getting worse and worse we did 2x weekly CBT with lots of "homework" (exposures etc). It did absolutely nothing. In fact, I think the CBT had a very negative effect: permanently imprinting truly awful memories of his school in his brain (thankfully he is now back in school but there was no way he was going to go back to the school where this started; to this day, he won't set foot on that campus). I wish I had taken the energy we were putting into CBT (and then going to the psychiatrist for zoloft, also totally ineffective) and put it into medical treatment (abx, naproxen, steriods etc). Our son would never have gotten as sick as he did had we known sooner (like practically every PANDAS kid). It is very hard to know what to do, but if the antibiotics are not sufficient in bringing back your child (and unfortunately, that appears to be the case quite often) , then I would start pushing for a 5 day steriod burst. If there is a glimmer of hope with that burst, then you know it is not separation anxiety, but brain inflammation and you can pursue more medical treatment options more rapidly. As others above have said, CBT is a very useful tool. Just not for someone in a full flare of PANDAS/PANS. I think CBT can be very helpful after a child has started recovery and parents are trying to nudge them along to be able to do more and more. When we got to that stage, I had a thought along the lines of "oh, so this is what we should have been seeing with all that CBT." And unfortunately it seems CBT is a tool many parents continue to have to use when recovering from future additional flares along the way... Best of luck.
  41. 1 point
    lysia

    Do symptoms change after puberty?

    I am an adult female. I was never diagnosed with any mental illness as a child, as my parents addressed any psychological issues as solely behavioral problems to be disciplined. That being said, I suffered from very severe OCD symptoms that (I suspect) **might have been a result of PANDAS. [As this was never diagnosed nor treated, it is purely personal seculation based on the symptomology and relative timeline of exposure to streptococcus- I also share other speculations as to possible causes for the disorder, though mostly suspect the former.] I can say that for myself; the OCD began to dissipate very significantly after puberty and continued to do so over the years. I have no significant nor any life debilitating symptoms remaining of OCD whatsoever. The most debilitating and severe period of OCD that I had was between the ages of about (I think) 7-12. However, the habitual thought patterns that I had developed in my brain during that time (mind you with no counseling/medication or understanding of it as a disorder whatsoever) did take a significant amount of years to fully recover; therein many behaviors still remained. I say this because I do believe that it is highly possible that the neurophysiological OCD had in fact been mostly if not wholly eradicated during the pubescent period in which I would had been experiencing many hormonal and chemical changes in the brain possibly countering or overwhelming some others. (Again- this is much personal speculation.) Nonetheless, because OCD is what it is, I find it impossible to consider these behaviors would disappear at the same time. Gradually they did go away. I imagine then on came bigger problems of being a teenager and every little bit by bit the tics and compulsions and obsessions did dissipate. I was VERY secretive of rituals (tapping/counting/hoarding/maaany others) and did them in a way not to be seen. Because of this and that whatever my parents might had known was never pronounced to me as a "mental disorder", I credit my ignorance to having an actual illness in a way to having had allowed me to recover; as there was no stigma or added obsession (i was highly obsessed with everything) that I was handicapped with a psychological ailment. In a way, the denial around me helped. This is NOT to diminish that as a whole, however I suffered far more severely because of it. But it is worth noting i think that sometimes less attention may help with recovery. Overall of course, a child needs their mother so much, and for one with ocd- they really need their mom. I love my parents who did just as they felt best, but during that time (that to this day I remember SO well as being so truly horrifying for me), I didn't have that. I was so extremely confused, shameful, scared, and exhausted. And so incredibly isolated. I am so grateful pediatric illnessness like these are finally recognized and kids now can have amazing mothers like you who are on their side of the struggle with them rather than at the other end of it. No child should have to feel so shamed, scared, and alone. Illness, treatments, recoveries and even regressions are just as any other experiences and trials of life. They are part of each individuals journey into becoming the person they are meant to be. And children are (be them healthy/disabled/'normal'..whatever) absolutely beautiful and perfect every step of the way. This is what I wish my mother would had said to me. So i could have understood that I'm not my illness, but my strength to battle this is part of what makes me so incredible and builds my character into the fantastic person I am to become. (Of course- this and also 'lets see a psychiatrist and get treatment'), but all the same Sorry about the tangent! I came about writing this commenr ( now... memoir) in searching this subject in Google just now out of random curiosity while reflecting upon my past. When I saw your q, I felt I just had to respond with hope because my google search q was: "my pandas ocd gone after puberty". When I read this, I was so inspired by you and what you are doing for your child. Asking these questions, treating her, and being in the fight along side with her. I joined just so I could write this to you to thank you for what you are doing for her and to send the hope to u both that it absolutely goes away. I can only imagine how exhausting and challenging it could be for a parent. But can also know first hand how horrible it is to have the illness, and to go it alone as a kid is beyond awful. So that's it, really. BLESS you mom for taking care of your girl and it absolutely does get better, as I feel that indeed post pubescence changed everything. So yes- hope is there and she WILL recover. I had a fantastic time by high school being ocd free (mind you tendencies there but I feel this is a bit of personal brain wiring and takes lots of time and work . It was NOT like it was before puberty). Keep being the AMAZING kick mom you are. I'm so SO happy she has you. Just needed to respond. [[**As a side note: in respect to the other comment made by a parent in which i felt some ocd kids might be getting stigmatized by the illness and certain behaviors are being either dismissed or over addressed as psych symptoms when in fact they are either one of 2 things: an unrelated call for help or personal struggle environmentally that isn't to do with ocd, or otherwise just a very healthy response to stresses of puberty. I wanted to throw out the fact that nearly every pubescent child/young adult/teen are often incomprehensibly 'nuts by nature' too! Please consider it's a crazy time for them (thier brains, bodies, self identy, sense of life..) and the healthiest girl during puberty can be a total weirdo obsessive anxious nightmare of a kid too I wouldnt had wanted my parents to say to me it was the 'ocd' every time I acted out (either by way of empathizing/diminishing/ reprimanding or whatever) and I could be horrid at times. I fear it would had kept the obsession for me longer and I would had never believed I would be rid of it. . Maybe i would had even used it as an excuse to get away with bad behavior which would had also drawn self identity to ocd and inhibited recovery . A BIG part of breaking this very strong mental lock is to forget it whenever possible. And it is VERY hard to do, but a beautiful thing when it happens. And each instance builds into healing. Sometimes it is rare and fleeting. Sometimes it is overwhelmed by something else negative (like even some nutty teen drama being created). I would just hate a reminder if it wasn't on my brain already. So i say, if they are being teen brats and it is not 100% textbook symptomatic of OCD, then dont call them out on having a psychological illness, call them out for being brats! (Just my opinion)]]. Good luck to you and your amazing kid. You're really a hero to me. Truly. Much love.
  42. 1 point
    Hello, My son has been suffering with PANS/PANDAS since age 8. He is now 14. He was diagnosed at age 11 by a PANDAS doctor after a few years of having standard mental health treatment without success. After two years of antibiotics he received IVIG and six week post-IVIG became significantly worse. Our doctor had never seen this before. We called Dr. K. in Chicago who said my son probably still had strep in his tonsils. We were unable to get a doctor to remove his tonsils based on the PANDAS diagnosis alone. One ENT gave him clindamycin which has a history of getting into tonsils better. His PANDAS doctor then ordered the Cunninham Panel which was negative. My son did not want to participate in their study. We were left with returning to conventional neurology for the tourette symptoms and psychiatry for the OCD. A new neurologist/psychiatrist (a conventional mainstream doctor) heard our story and thought we should try the IVIG again. We did a second round and my son improved greatly then after the third round he's like his old self (as much as I can remember him after all these years.) It feels like a miracle to me. Although he's not 100% better it's remarkable enough for everyone in his life to notice. I'm not sure what helped this time. Maybe the clindamycin before the IVIG? Do not give up based on a Cunningham Panel. It is still experimental. I was crying when the doctor told me it was negative and IVIG would not work for my son. I was certain it was PANDAS. They (Cunningham) are still looking for markers and the current panel does not cover all possible markers which is why they ask families to participate in the research to find new markers. If I had turned down the offer for more IVIG based on the other doctor's recommendation from the results of the Cunningham Panel my son would not be on his way back to wholeness today. His tics are almost completely gone after years of severe tics and anxiety is very low. Almost normal. Of course after years of being in the grips of PANDAS my son has much catching up to do with peers. We still have much healing to do. I'm not sure he will ever catch up but at least now he has a chance. Good luck to everyone. Eva
  43. 1 point
    lnn

    homeschooling/schoolwork and pandas

    Welcome to the forum and "welcome" to Pandas/Pans. I've unfortunately been at this for many years, first with my now recovered son and now with my daughter. I home schooled my daughter last year because her health was too precarious. Because it was only for one year and we always had the intention of returning to public school when she was able (for social reasons), our approach was probably different from yours. But I'll share what worked in case it helps. I think the biggest thing that was helpful was mindset. Like your daughter, mine went from being very capable to being very handicapped in what she could handle in terms of workload and abilities. There's a medical reason for this - inflammation in the brain creates what's called a cytokine storm. There are many inflammatory cytokines that become elevated, but one - CaM Kinase II - is essential for learning and memory - from Wikipedia: Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II or CaMKII) is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase that is regulated by the Ca2+ /calmodulin complex. CaMKII is involved in many signaling cascades and is thought to be an important mediator of learning and memory.[1] Misregulation of CaMKII is linked to Alzheimer’s disease, Angelman syndrome, and heart arrhythmia.[6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ca2%2B/calmodulin-dependent_protein_kinase_II We had bad days and worse days. Some days, she was able to learn in a fairly typical manner and other days, it was like teaching someone who had suffered a brain injury like a stroke or car accident. So the most important thing I did each day was to feel out where she was at, what she was capable of that day (and I also had to realize that every day might put us at a different starting place, and sometimes she'd have different capabilities throughout the day). Re-setting my expectations on the fly was essential. Otherwise, I'd expect too much, she'd stress over disappointing me and over her own sense of loss. Much like working with someone who's in rehab for a stroke - how frustrating it is to not be able to do things you've easily done for your whole life. So forget about what she used to be able to do. Forget about what her brother can do. These are, for now, false points of reference. Start each lesson by assessing where she is at that moment and work with that. Do not show your frustration or expect more than she can give. That just blames her for something that's not in her control. You wouldn't do that to someone in rehab. You can push the way a cheerleader might - "hey, do you think you can do one more problem? No? Ok, take a break, you did a good job." But don't push with the thought that you can somehow push her back into being her old self (spoken from experience). My daughter (12) reads at a 12th grade level. But there were many times she couldn't focus on the words on the page. But she could listen. So I'd read her social studies book to her while she doodled (drawing helped her stay focused, ironically, because it's something that relaxes her and it distracted her from her anxiety). Then she'd answer questions about what I'd just read to her. Sometimes she could write the answers herself, sometimes I could see from her horrible handwriting that I'd have to scribe what she verbally told me. We just had to be flexible. We did a lot of verbal discussions. We broke lessons up into very small chunks - sometimes as little as 5 minutes. Then we'd re-group 15 minutes later, or an hour later, or a day later. I had to let go of my scheduling, my goals, and just listen to her body and support her. The old her was temporarily gone. I had to teach the person who showed up that day and just help that person do her best for that day. Not easy for a Type A mom. But it's what she needed. She is back in school this year, on a modified school day, with many absences (but for social reasons, she is adamant about being back in public). We often find ourselves having to do do school work at home to make up for missed days, and our approach is to do things in very small chunks. When she's feeling well, she takes pride in doing things independently. When she's in a bad place, I sit with her and coach her every step of the way. It's very much a teaching-as-if-you're-a-rehab-therapist approach. The amazing thing is that once the body heals, the old child comes back. You don't need to worry about her getting lazy or developing bad habits. No one wants to get back to her old self more than she does. When she heals, she will return to the independent, curious child she's been.
  44. 1 point
    Did you receive a recommendation for a PANDAS doc in Orange County? I live in OC as well and have a good integrative medicine doctor that we have been using. My DS has also been diagnosed with Lyme so now I'm spreading out to an LLMD but up to now I've been happy with our integrative medicine doctor - she is very thorough and caring. Let me know if you'd like a referral and I'll private message you.
  45. 1 point
    If your child has Myamotoi Borrelia it would NOT have come up positive on standard Lyme test. It has different proteins and not testable at this time. Borrelia Spirochetes can be sexually transmitted and also passed from mother to child in-utero. We have 3 children with gestational Lyme et al PANS/PANDAS/Autism. I PM'd you a list of Dr.'s. One is located in Santa Barbara for you plus some really good Dr.'s/NP's in Bay Area. 2 of the NPs listed have children with PANS/PANDAS. Look in upper right hand corner for PM message.
  46. 1 point
    Your child's Periodic Fever Syndrome as a toddler has me concerned there are other potential infections involved. Many of us found that although strep was an obvious trigger there were other underlying infections or viruses. Borrelia Miyamotoi is the more predominate TBI (tick born infection) in CA and is not testable via any standard Lyme test. Borrelia Miyamoti is also known to cause relapsing fevers. Here is a little blurb and you can google Borrelia Migamotoi Relapsing Fever for more references. Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever Borrelia group spirochete that is transmitted by the same hard-bodied (ixodid) tick species that transmit the agents of Lyme disease. Tick Study in CA: http://www.bayarealyme.org/about-lyme/what-causes-lyme-disease/borrelia-miyamotoi/ http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/miyamotoi.html I would highly recommend seeing an LLMD (Lyme Literate Dr.) that understands PANS/PANDAS to investigate further for your son. We have wonderful LLMDs in Northern CA that are very well versed in PANS and/or PANDAS if you are willing to travel. Please PM via the forum for referrals. Does your child have a known tick bite at any point in his life?
  47. 1 point
    I'm not sure how to ask "what would be approved?", and get any info beyond what is listed in their IG clinical guideline document. That doesn't even list anti-NDMAR encephalitis -- so it's so out of date. But you're right; if it were a change in rationale, it wouldn't sound forthright. If I were to pursue the deficiency angle, I think I'd want to expand the argument and state what is the truth, i.e., that we're dealing with two problems. However ....The low dose and high dose seem to have opposite effects -- the low dose is immune-stimulatory, and the high dose immune-regulatory. So I'd be wary of making things worse by giving DS the immune-stimulatory dose. But... what if insurance were to approve say 500mg/kg IVIG product for the IgG deficiency, and my doctor prescribed 1.5 g/kg, would insurance pay for the administration and 1/3 of the Ig product, or nothing? I think I've read of someone on this site whose kid had had LD 2x, which didn't help, then the third time the MD prescribed HD and it did help a lot. So i hope the answer is the former.
  48. 1 point
    Full immune panel (IgG, IgA, etc.), ASO (strep), anti dnase B (longer-term strep titer). I think methylation issues are a VERY worthwhile trail of exploration for someone your age dealing with these issues, and it appears from your signature line that you done that. So none of the interventions you're trying for the mutations has been effective? Wombat, I don't want to discourage you from exploring every available avenue, but as the mom of a now 18-year-old who was first diagnosed with OCD at age 6, didn't get a PANDAS diagnosis until age 12, responded very well to abx (brought him back from a totally dysfunctional brink), but continues to deal with some ongoing OCD and anxiety issues (though manageable) . . . I just want to encourage you to perhaps not get hung up on the testing and interventions tied to traditional PANDAS/PANs (rapid onset, pre-pubescent expression, abx, IVIG, etc.) and perhaps lean toward more "lifestyle" type interventions that will hopefully help make life more functional, more fun, and help you push away more of the OCD that interferes with your everyday life. If you do yet have underlying infection, be it lyme or strep, etc., then abx, IVIG, etc. will likely help you to an extent. (How long were the course of abx you've tried in the past? Can you get a longer-term prescription for them and journal your behavior patterns for a period of months? We found that, after the initial "burst" of palpable benefits, abx tended to yield more subtle improvements over time . . . perhaps unnoticeable to a majority of people, but by reading back through our journaling of things our DS used to do but didn't need to do anymore, or things he'd given up to the King OCD but had begun to resume as he improved). But just from our experience, having contended with OCD for as many years as you have, I would not want to lead you to believe that abx or IVIG will be a panacea -- a cure-all. And if either of them is to be effective, IMHO, given your age and the term of your dealing with this condition, I'd wager that that you would need a longer and/or more repetitive course of these medical interventions than might be the case for a younger, more recently diagnosed case (our DS took abx for about 2 years). Additionally, I would suggest dietary, supplements, ERP/CBT and perhaps even some prescription medications to help you gain more leverage over the OCD, even if only as temporary measures. In the end, the PANDAs tests and interventions turned our DS's life around, but even so, he continues to need supports. Whether that's because he was older and the anxiety/OCD was more entrenched by the time we determined the immune condition, or if it's because it's genetically part of who he is and the PANDAS just made it worse, I can't tell you. But I've made my peace with throwing everything at this monster that's at our disposal, and that methodology, in the end, has given my DS his life back. Keep fighting, keep searching and never say never! All the best to you!
  49. 1 point
    MomWithOCDSon

    Looking for success stories

    Welcome to the forum, but sorry your family has been forced to deal with PANDAS/PANs. As you do some reading here, you'll find that our stories, including treatment protocols, can vary widely. What does seem to be a thru-line to some extent, however, are commonalities among behaviors that we see in our kids when they're sick. There's some commonality in response to various medications and supplements, too, but not always. Time frames vary dramatically, also; I have my suspicions that this variance has to do with age at diagnosis, length of time the child was suffering due to PANDAS/PANs but went incorrectly diagnosed prior to diagnosis and treatment, and similar temporal differences. My DS was diagnosed with "regular OCD" at age 6 and went through a second "flare" or exacerbation at about 7.5 years. We inquired about PANDAS with ped, therapist, and ultimately a psych as well but were told it wasn't "real," and since our DS was classically asymptomatic for strep, we couldn't demonstrate a link, either. So we treated with therapy and finally an SSRI (Lexapro) until he turned 12. At 12, he completely flipped out. Went from being fully functional, funny, social, academically gifted, to a basket case. Couldn't read, sleep, play, eat. Psych kept switching up psych meds . . . different doses, different formulas. Nothing worked, and he just got worse. "Saving Sammy" and subsequent email conversations with its author, Beth Maloney, turned our attention back to PANDAS/PANS, particularly since Sammy was classically asymptomatic also. Ultimately, we were able to prove some atypical immune response through blood tests, and our ped was, gratefully, willing to give us an abx trial. Based on Sammy's protocol and our DS's similarity to Sammy in terms of age, behavior set, etc., we began with Augmentin XR, 1,000 mg., twice daily. When I found this forum and connected with a number of other families and great minds who were deep into the latest research, helping their own families and others, too, we began to explore other supplements that could assist DS with respect to immune balance and behavior; we also found a PANDAS-literate psych and reduced his SSRI dose and changed the med, as well, to Zoloft. We looked into IVIG but did not pursue it for a number of reasons, not the least of which was DS was so positively responsive to abx, we didn't entirely see the need for another, more expensive intervention. DS was on the XR for nearly 2 years; we slowly weaned him off the last 4 months or so. He also continued on Zoloft and certain supplements we found seemed to help him on an ongoing basis: NAC, B6, zinc, quercitin, omegas and magnesium. We also kept him on probiotics (sach b. and a mixed flora) during the abx and for quite some time afterward. ERP therapy was also his constant companion, twice each week for the first year or so following his PANDAS dx, and then edging off slowly as we saw him gaining more traction over the OCD, and as we became more and more literate as parents in terms of helping him beat back the OCD at home, rather than accommodating it. He's now 17 and I consider him a success story. He can now maintain his health -- mental and physical -- even when exposed to strep. He's been off abx for nearly 3 years, though he continues on a low-dose SSRI. I've found a compounding vitamin supplier and have been able to order a custom blend multivitamin for him that contains the things we know help, and leaves out the components we've seen can have negative impacts for him. He is back to his functional self -- funny, fun, bright, in AP and honors classes in his senior year in high school, has friends, etc. He still contends with some OCD; whether or not that's because he was dealing with that for 6 years before we were successful in getting PANDAS intervention I can't say for sure, but that's what I suspect. His brain was being wired those 6 years, so undoing that will likely continue to take some time. I wish you all the best, and from our experience I will offer two key perspectives: 1) time is an important component in the healing process; and 2) don't ever give up!
  50. 1 point
    Decent Symptom List For LYME/Co-infections. LYME DISEASE AND THE CO-INFECTIONS 07/26/2010 Lyme disease is a major health problem in the United States. Since the infective agent, the bacteria known as Borrelia burgdorferi, is so difficult to locate and diagnose using present-day blood tests, it often goes undiagnosed and untreated or improperly treated. Even with practitioners who consider themselves Lyme-Literate Medical Doctors (LLMDs) or Lyme-Aware Medical Practitioners (LAMPs) diagnosing this infection can be very frustrating for several reasons. There are several great books that address the controversy, the politics, the diagnosis, and the treatment, and I will refer you to them for further information. However, two of the most important reasons that proper diagnosis is so difficult is that Borrelia burgdorferi can change its shape and form as a way of protecting itself. These protective forms rarely, if ever, show up in the blood and hide away in other tissues that would require biopsies to identify them. And, second the blood labs used to identify our immune response to these organisms have not been completely refined and, at best are 70% effective and, at worst, only 30% effective. The majority of healthcare providers, not being Lyme knowledgeable, busy themselves treating the symptoms or possibly even treating the wrong disease. Lyme disease is also known as "The Great Imposter" or "The Great Imitator." It can mimic such conditions as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and many different heart and vascular conditions. From the practitioners point of view, it makes it even more difficult to properly diagnose and treat when Lyme disease is very often accompanied by any a number of, just as bad or worse, organisms such as Babesia, Bartonella, Ehrlichia, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein Bar Virus, Herpes Simplex I and II, Human Herpes Virus 6 (HHV 6), Rickettsia, and Mycoplasma. I have listed below some of the symptoms related to chronic disseminated Lyme disease (Borreliosis), Babesiosis, and Bartonellosis. You will notice that there are many symptoms that overlap with these three infections. Please circle (O) the bullet if you are presently experiencing this symptom and place and (X) at the bullet if you've experienced this symptom in the past. Next to the (O) or the (X), please rate the symptom on a scale from 1 - 10. Very rarely or few symptoms would be a 1 while often and/or severe would be a 10. Lyme Disease Arthritis-like joint pain and swelling (often migrating or moving from joint to joint) "Brain fog" with poor concentration, focus, and/or attention Disrupted sleep cycles, resulting in poor quality sleep, too little sleep, difficulty staying asleep, or early awakening Back pain Light sensitivity and/or blurred vision, increased eye floaters Ear symptoms (hearing loss, ringing in the ears, or sensitivity to noise or certain frequencies) Chronic and/or severe fatigue with minimal stamina Facial paralysis (especially Bell's Palsy) Chronic pain and tender points throughout the muscles of the body Walking and balance problems Headaches Impaired muscle coordination Impaired reflexes Memory loss (especially short-term memory) Muscle weakness Nerve symptoms (numbness, tingling, burning, vibrating, or shooting) Night sweats, clamminess, unexplained fevers, flushing Unexplained weight change (loss or gain) Unexplained hair loss Swollen and/or tender glands Sore throat Testicular / pelvic pain Unexplained menstrual irregularities Unexplained breast pain / milk production Sexual dysfunction and loss of libido Upset stomach with nausea and possibly pain Changes in bowel function (constipation or diarrhea) Muscle twitching of the face or other muscles Increased motion sickness, vertigo, or poor balance Tremors Confusion, difficulty in thinking Difficulty concentrating / reading Disorientation (getting lost, going to the wrong places) Speech difficulties, vocalization problems, problems writing, word block Exaggerated symptoms or worse hangover from alcohol Over 50% of those with chronic Lyme disease exhibit mental and emotional symptoms including: Behavioral disorders including impulsive acts of aggression and violence Extreme mood swings between depression and mania Chronic depression Dementia Eating disorders Hallucinations Mood swings Panic attacks Extreme fears or phobias Schizophrenia Personality disorders (radical change in someone's personality) Thoughts of suicide Irritability A large percentage of individuals with Lyme infections also exhibit heart and vascular symptoms including: Shortness of breath with minimal exertion Gasping for air Irregular heart rhythms (occasional irregular beats or beating too fast known as tachycardia) Chest pains / soreness in the ribs Enlarged heart Palpitations Fainting sensations Non-productive cough History of heart murmur or valve prolapse Two major clues that Lyme is the cause of the above symptoms are: the progressive worsening over time of a multi-system pattern of symptoms, and the tendency for these symptoms to wax and wane in a cyclical fashion. That is, every 3 to 6 weeks, it seems that the symptoms get worse for a few days, after which they resume the previous pattern. Babesiosis Chills Fatigue and often excessive sleepiness Night sweats often drenching and profuse Severe muscle pains, especially the large muscles of the legs (quadriceps, hamstrings, buttocks, etc) Neurological symptoms often described as "dizzy, tipsy, and spiciness," similar to a sensation of floating or of walking off the top of a mountain onto a cloud Depression Episodes of breathlessness, "air hunger" and/or cough Decreased appetite and/or nausea, perhaps vomiting Spleen and/or liver enlargement Laboratory abnormalities that may include low white blood cell count, low platelet counts, mild elevation of liver enzymes, and elevated "sed rate" Headaches (migraine-like, persistent, and especially involving the back of the head and upper neck areas) Less common symptoms are joint pain (more common with Lyme and Bartonella), anxiety and/or panic attacks (more common with Bartonella), lymph gland swelling (more common with Bartonella and Lyme), non-specific "sick feeling" (also encountered with Bartonella and Lyme) Dark urine Enlarged lymph nodes Significant memory changes Struggle organizing Profound psychiatric illnesses Significant fatigue, daytime sleep urgency despite nighttime sleep Waves of generalized itching Balance problems with dizziness Severe chest wall pains Random stabbing pains Weight loss Sensitivity to light Sleep in excess of 8 ½ hours per night Sore throat with unproductive cough Bartonellosis Fatigue (often with agitation, unlike Lyme disease which is more associated with exhaustion) Low grade fevers, especially morning and/or late afternoon, often associated with feelings of "coming down with the flu or a virus" Headaches, especially frontal (often confused with sinus) or top of head Eye symptoms are common and include blurred-vision episodes, red eyes, dry eyes, depth perception problems, retinal problems, and light sensitivity Ringling in the ears and sometimes hearing problems (decreased or even increased sensitivity known as hyperacusis) Sore throats that are recurring Swollen glands, especially neck and under arms Anxiety, panic, or worry attacks; others perceive as "very anxious" Agitation, irritability, rage, impulsivity, or aggression Episodes of confusion and disorientation that are usually transient (and very scary), often can be seizure-like in nature Poor sleep (especially difficulty falling asleep), poor quality sleep Joint pain and stiffness (often symmetrical, as opposed to Lyme which is often unsymmetrical and often migratory) Muscle pains, especially in the calves; may be twitching and cramping also Foot pain in the morning involving the heels or soles of the feet (sometimes diagnosed as plantar fasciitis) Nerve irritation symptoms that can be described as burning, vibrating, numb, shooting, tingling, and so forth Tremors and/or muscle twitching Heart palpitations and strange chest pains Episodes of breathlessness Strange rashes recurring on the body, red stretch marks, peculiar tender lumps and nodules along the sides of legs or arms, and spider veins Gut symptoms, especially acid reflux Shin bone pain and tenderness Fainting Bladder pain, irritation, infections Genital disorders Obesity and body swelling The list of Borreliosis, Bartonellosis, and Babesiosis symptoms were borrowed from Joseph Burrascano, M.D. (Checklist for Lyme Disease 2008), Kenneth Singleton, M.D., M.P.H. (The Lyme Disease Solution 2008), and James Schaller, M.D. (Bartonella: Diagnosis and Treatment 2008 and The Diagnosis and Treatment of Babesia 2006) http://www.drchuckcochran.com/articles/lyme-disease-and-the-coinfections/


×
×
  • Create New...