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Foods with Salycilates


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8 replies to this topic

#1 LuluGirl

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 03:18 PM

In the Apple Thread it was mentioned that in some people salycilates have an impact on tics. Other than apples, grapes and strawberries, can you give me a list of commonly eaten food that contain them? It's certainly worth a try!

Lulu


#2 Heather

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 04:08 PM

LuLu girl,

The following contain naturally occurring salicylates:

Almonds
Apples
Apricots
All berries
Cherries
Cloves
coffee
Cucumbers & pickles
Currants
Grapes and raisins
Nectarines
Oranges
Peaches
Peppers (Bell & chilies)
Plums and Prunes
Tangerines
Tea
Tomatoes

Your child may be sensitive to only 1 or 2 or these or none. It is a testing game. My son handles most fruit well but can't tolerate grapes or strawberries. He eats loads of blueberries with no reaction. Bananas, Melons and Pears are good fruit choices with little or no salicylate content.

Heather

Heather

#3 Heather

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 04:09 PM

The above information comes from the Feingold Program booklet.

#4 Guest_Scottish Nessie_*

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 07:20 PM

Hi Lulugirl,
There is a very good salicylate list at:

www.purr.demon.co.uk/Food/Salicylate.html

complete with quantities in milligrams per 100 grams. The Feingold list seems to have bypassed dates, which are extremely high in salicylates. I was happily giving my son dates as a "good" sweet treat, as he loves them until I came across the list above!!
I have just started my 8 year old son on an elimination diet so I would be very interested to know how you get on too!
Good Luck
Scottish Nessie

#5 Claire

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 11:27 PM

Nessie,

Too bizarre. For the first time in a year, I went looking for other tics forums tonight--just curious as to what was out there.

I saw a tourette's - scotland forum and there starting a thread re Feingold was Nessie with an 8 year old son.

I assume you are one and the same?

Welcome!

Claire

ps Australia, Canada, Singapore, U.S. and now Scotland--gotta love our shrinking world. :wub:

#6 Guest_Scottish Nessie_*

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Posted 11 November 2004 - 05:37 AM

Hi Claire,

Thanks for your welcome ----yes Scottish Nessie and Nessie are one and the same!

I am new to Feingold and Failsafe diets so any suggestions welcome. I do plough through the threads so I am slowly but surely learning.

Can you help with the other thread I posted about the salicylate content of palm oil. Why I need to know is because there is a cashew nut spred over here in UK by Meridian and it is just cashew nuts ( low salicylate ) and palm oil. My son loves cashews.

Thanks
Scottish Nessie

#7 Claire

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Posted 11 November 2004 - 12:01 PM

Hi Nessie,

Though I signed up for Feingold, I am no expert since salicylates don't bother my son (he is tic-free based exclusively on computer game/TV/screen elimination and subsequent treatment for elevated mercury enables him to view them via an LCD monitor without true restriction).

Ausclare/Marina/Caz are really aware of exactly what the salicylates are and should respond. However, I got this list from Kirkmann labs and it looks okay to me. (unless they chime in otherwise)...

Claire

http://www.kirkmanla...enol_bp835.html
A chart outlining phenolic and salicylate content of foods follows:

VERY HIGH
Apricots
Berries and Cherries
Orange and Tangerine
Pineapple
Red grapes
Tomatoes
Peppers
Mint
Anise (licorice)
Olives
Dill

HIGH TO MODERATE
Apples
Grapefruit
Peach and mangos
Watermelon
Broccoli and spinach
Carrots
Lettuce and chinese vegetables (except iceberg/low)
Most nuts and seeds
Onion

LOW TO NEGLIGIBLE
Bananas
Pears
Cabbage
Celery
Potatoes
Fats and Oils
Sugars
Soy Milk

#8 LuluGirl

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 07:42 AM

Thank you all for your help!

What kinds of reactions would these cause? If I eliminate, what would I look for? Due to his allergies he mostly only eats apples, carrots and pineapple so elimination will be easy. However, he's a picky eater and these are about the mainstay of hus fruit and veggie intake.....

Lulu

#9 Claire

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 09:06 PM

Hi Lulu,

I am not the salicylate/Feingold/Failsafe expert, that is more Jeff/Ausclare/Marina/Caz, but I will try to answer your question.

I do know they can cause tics and/or adhd in some people. So I believe that after eliminating them you look for improvement (in concentration, 'wiredness' or reduction in tics), then you watch for some worsening of symptoms when individual ones are reintroduced.

The main fruit is pears! Fortunately my son liked them.

By the way your story on the 'medicines' thread was very touching, thanks for sharing it. How frustrating that all you needed to do was to have a tutor. That is definitely NOT the first reaction of most doctors.

I read in a magazine once (never verified it elsewhere), that in certain states, if the teacher feels the child has adhd they can FORCE the parent to give it to the child. Can this really be true? How horrifying.

Claire




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